Life of James Mursell Phillippo: Missionary in Jamaica

Life of James Mursell Phillippo: Missionary in Jamaica

by Edward Bean Underhill
     
 

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Edward Bean Underhill (1813–1901), the energetic and much-travelled secretary of the Baptist Missionary Society, was active throughout his life in publishing and researching Baptist history. This 1881 biography of his recently-deceased friend James Phillippo (1798–1879) is based on diaries, a manuscript autobiography and papers made available to

Overview

Edward Bean Underhill (1813–1901), the energetic and much-travelled secretary of the Baptist Missionary Society, was active throughout his life in publishing and researching Baptist history. This 1881 biography of his recently-deceased friend James Phillippo (1798–1879) is based on diaries, a manuscript autobiography and papers made available to Underhill by Phillippo's family. Phillippo devoted over fifty years to Baptist missionary work in Jamaica and was a fierce advocate for the abolition of slavery. He landed in Jamaica in 1823, and developed a strong following, despite being banned from preaching to slaves on several occasions. In the 1830s he helped to establish free villages where newly emancipated (and now homeless) slaves could settle. Underhill's thorough account of Phillippo's eventful life focuses specially on the missionary's hard-won victories over his wealthy and powerful opponents. The book includes a list of the many schools and churches established by Phillippo in Jamaica.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781108032568
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/16/2011
Series:
Cambridge Library Collection - Religion Series
Pages:
454
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.02(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. THE STUDENT—182o To 1821. Mr. Phillippo found three associates in his student-life at Chipping Norton, afterwards increased to seven, two of whom, like himself, were destined to missionary service. He began his studies in a very hopeful spirit. " Now," he says, " I can look forward with a hope, full of animation, to that day on which, if spared, I shall embark on the great and wide sea to impart to the infatuated slaves of sin and Satan 'the glorious Gospel of the blessed God.' Henceforward let my motto be, Knergy, Prudence, Economy, Temperance, Perseverance, with ardent love to God and man." In an interesting letter, written about a month after his arrival in Chipping Norton, to the Rev. J. Denham, he thus speaks of the feelings with which he girded himself for his task. " I arrived here the evening after my departure from town. . . . The days and weeks that have passed away since my coming may be numbered among the happiest of my life. . . . There are several dark villages around us, to which we go alternately to break the bread of life. Last Sabbath I preached at Middleton Cheney, a village in Northamptonshire. I felt more comfortable than I expected, and I trust that my one great aim was, and I hope ever will be so, to preach the truth earnestly, faithfully, and simply, that when called away I may leave the pulpit and the world clear of the blood of all men. Ihave commenced my studies. I find them difficult, of course, but I am determined, by grace given me from above, to surmount them all, in view of the great object of my heart, to preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ. I do feel, as the holy Pearce says, ' a glowing satisfaction in thethought of spending my life in something nobler than the locality of this island will permit....

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