Lifehouse

Lifehouse

4.7 71
by Lifehouse
     
 

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There's no shortage of angry young men in the realm of rock, but when it comes to articulate and mature 20-somethings, the field is fairly open -- which makes Lifehouse frontman Jason Wade all the more compelling. There's a dreamy aspect to a number of the disc's dozen tunes, as evidenced by the opening "Come Back Down," which pits airy harmonies against a backdrop… See more details below

Overview

There's no shortage of angry young men in the realm of rock, but when it comes to articulate and mature 20-somethings, the field is fairly open -- which makes Lifehouse frontman Jason Wade all the more compelling. There's a dreamy aspect to a number of the disc's dozen tunes, as evidenced by the opening "Come Back Down," which pits airy harmonies against a backdrop focused on a spare, chiming guitar line. Wade still has issues in the realm of romance -- a trait that might wreak havoc in his personal life but one that enables him to compose compellingly angsty missives like the stormy "You and Me" and the wounded "We'll Never Know" (which has a streak of Goo Goo Dolls balladry running through it). For "Walking Away," on the other hand, Wade takes a slightly more detached approach, one that's underscored by the deliberate pace and soft-focus guitars reminiscent of psychedelic-era Beatles album tracks. There's nothing particularly groundbreaking in the grooves of Lifehouse, but Wade pours so much of himself into them, those familiar sounds take on a newly minted sheen.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Three albums in and Lifehouse sound comfortable -- comfortable in their skin, comfortable working within the constraints of adult alternative radio, comfortable enough to deaden any possible lingering Creed or Stone Temple Pilots comparisons that might have plagued them after their first two records. Here, on their eponymous third album, Lifehouse is a rock band that doesn't rock. They strum acoustic guitars and sing earnest mid-tempo anthems and ballads, all given a slick shine by producer John Alagia, who has previously worked on records by the Dave Matthews Band, John Mayer, and Jason Mraz -- a collaborator whose very presence indicates how far the group has shifted from its early Brendan O'Brien productions. While some longtime fans will miss the band's harder side, Lifehouse sound, well, more comfortable in this setting, and they've made an album that's smooth, mellow, pleasant, and tuneful, a record that's designed to ease onto the AAA radio waves, where it will politely sit next to songs by Matthews, Mayer, and Mraz.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/22/2005
Label:
Geffen Records
UPC:
0602498803738
catalogNumber:
000430812
Rank:
17938

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Lifehouse   Primary Artist
John Alagia   Bass,Piano,Electric Guitar,Hammond Organ,Ukulele,Vibes,chamberlain,Vocal Harmony
Oliver Kraus   Cello
Jason Wade   Guitar,Vocals,Group Member
Bryce Soderberg   Bass,Background Vocals,Group Member
Stewart Meyers   Bass
Rick Woolstenhulme   Percussion,Piano,Drums,Group Member

Technical Credits

Jude Cole   Composer,Executive Producer
Ted Jensen   Mastering
John Alagia   Producer
Oliver Kraus   String Arrangements
Jeff Juliano   Engineer
Jason Wade   Composer,String Arrangements
Scott Faircloff   Composer

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