Life's Worth

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$13.28
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $2.31
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 89%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (32) from $2.31   
  • New (13) from $2.37   
  • Used (19) from $2.31   

Overview

Today there is growing acceptance of the idea of physician-assisted suicide. Even Christians are beginning to factor the possibility into their ethical understandings. Would it not be compassionate to acquiesce in a terminally ill patient's request to end it all? This sentiment seems reasonable, even humane. But as Harvard ethicist Arthur J. Dyck shows in this powerful work, there are solid moral and practical bases for the existing laws against assisted suicide in the United States and elsewhere.
Over the course of four interconnected, tightly reasoned arguments, Dyck takes readers from a basic concern for human suffering -- the main focus of those who support assisted suicide -- to the deeper truths of life's inherent worth. Dyck begins by examining the arguments of some physicians, moral philosophers, and theologians for making assisted suicide available. He also discusses the alternative practice of comfort-only care, explaining why it differs morally from assisted suicide and euthanasia. Dyck then explores and defends the moral structure underlying the West's long tradition of homicide law as well as current law against assisted suicide and euthanasia -- laws designed to protect both freedom and human life. Finally, Dyck shows that the moral structure undergirding our system of law is compatible with the views of Christianity, and he points to certain Christian beliefs that provide comfort and hope to those who are suffering, dying, or experiencing the death of loved ones.

Throughout the book, Dyck staunchly maintains that assisted suicide is unacceptable in any and all circumstances. The practice denies terminally ill patients the possibility of recovery and robs them ofthe chance to rethink the meaning of their lives or to achieve spiritual growth. Furthermore, because it undermines the shared moral structure that makes community possible, assisted suicide bodes ill for society as a whole. "Life's Worth" is a must-read for anyone grappling with this hotly debated issue.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This exceptionally cogent contribution to an often muddled debate defends legal prohibitions against physician assisted suicide (PAS), while urging that "comfort-only care"-in which life-sustaining treatments may be discontinued-should be available for terminally ill patients. While it addresses a range of questions, the book centers on our intuitions of what makes killing wrong, introducing notions of an inalienable right to life, humans' natural love of life and the sanctity of human life. Dyck, professor of population ethics at Harvard, displays a strong grasp of relevant issues in ethics, law and political philosophy, and represents opposing views with scrupulous accuracy. His methodical (and, at points, highly original) critique of justifications for PAS avoids the sensationalism that easily creeps into this topic. Dyck devotes more attention to the likes of Timothy Quill than Jack Kevorkian, and engages moderate positions-those accommodating PAS under narrowly prescribed circumstances-rather than merely scoring easy points against more radical approaches. While Dyck's views reflect a Christian perspective, as is especially clear in the final chapter, he avoids "an appeal to authority as such" in favor of a more general claim that "the obligation to foster and preserve our larger communities is a shared, human responsibility. Loving one's neighbor as oneself is not solely a personal or private matter for Christians or non-Christians...[both] have a shared moral responsibility for the laws and policies that are essential for protecting human life." (Dec.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802845948
  • Publisher: Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 11/1/2002
  • Series: Critical Issues in Bioethics Ser.
  • Pages: 124
  • Product dimensions: 0.26 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Table of Contents

Series Editors' Foreword
Introduction 1
1 Responding to Suffering: Physician-Assisted Suicide versus Comfort-Only Care 11
2 Physician-Assisted Suicide versus Comfort-Only Care: Do They Differ Morally in Significant Ways? 29
3 The Moral Structure of Life's Worth and Protection 45
4 Christian Morality and Natural Morality in Law and Public Policy 73
Index 109
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)