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Light in August
     

Light in August

4.2 41
by William Faulkner
 

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Joe Christmas does not know whether he is black or white. Faulkner makes of Joe's tragedy a powerful indictment of racism; at the same time Joe's life is a study of the divided self and becomes a symbol of 20th century man.

Overview

Joe Christmas does not know whether he is black or white. Faulkner makes of Joe's tragedy a powerful indictment of racism; at the same time Joe's life is a study of the divided self and becomes a symbol of 20th century man.

Editorial Reviews

Donald Adams
With this new novel, Mr. Faulkner has taken a tremendous stride forward. . . . Light in August is a powerful novel, a book which secures Mr. Faulkner's place in the very front rank of American writers of fiction. -- Books of the Century; New York Times review, October 1932
From the Publisher
“No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word than did William Faulkner. If you want to know all you can about that heart and soul, the fiction where he put it is still right there.” —Eudora Welty
 
“Faulkner’s greatness resided primarily in his power to transpose the American scene as it exists in the Southern states, filter it through his sensibilities and finally define it with words.” —Richard Wright

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780394309682
Publisher:
Random House, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/01/1981

What People are Saying About This

Edmund Wilson
Faulkner ... belongs to the full-dressed post-Flaubert group of Conrad, Joyce, and Proust.
Ralph Ellison
For all his concern with the South, Faulkner was actually seeking out the nature of man. Thus we must return to him for that continuity of moral purpose which made for the greatness of our classics.
Robert Penn Warren
For all the range of effect, philosophical weight, originality of style, variety of characterization, humor, and tragic intensity [Faulkner's works] are without equal in our time and country.

Meet the Author

William Cuthbert Faulkner was born in 1897 and raised in Oxford, Mississippi, where he spent most of his life. One of the towering figures of American literature, he is the author of The Sound and the Fury, Absalom, Absalom!, and As I Lay Dying, a,ong many other remarkable books.Faulkner was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1950 and France’s Legion of Honor in 1951. He died in 1962.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 25, 1897
Date of Death:
July 6, 1962
Place of Birth:
New Albany, Mississippi
Place of Death:
Byhalia, Mississippi

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Light in August 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My first time reading a Faulkner novel but it will not be the last. This book is just so wonderful. Lots of symbolism. I would say this book is not for the impatient reader, but it makes you realize how some author's are really light weights. I would most surely recommend this for book discussions. I really enjoyed being in the old South!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though complex, this is a very approachable book, far from the modernist experimentation on books lik As I Lay Dying or The Sound and the Fury. A book about race but the character has so little black blood that he can easily pass. Yet his profound secret makes him restless and violent accepted by neither blacks nor whites. The other story in this novel is that of a strong young Alabama woman pregnant and abandoned by her one night stand. Faulkner creates a strong female heroine unencumbered by either the social dogma of unwed pregnancy or her gender in a time when society would assign her the role ou outcast. Although their stories overlap only in the father of the baby, their stories combine to show a changing South the violence to come from those who hold to the established structure of Southern culture and the forces that will destroy this culture quiet soon. Well worth reading both for those well acquainted with Faulkner and for those waiting to fall in love with his page-long sentences, his profound descriptions, and his heartbreaking picture of a flawed yet beautiful time that will soon end.
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