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Light, Libation, And The Parsing Of Health
     

Light, Libation, And The Parsing Of Health

by Elizabeth Schneider
 
The first essay explores the short term effects of mental health symptoms on employment outcomes. To address potential simultaneity bias, I propose a new instrument related to Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) that depends only on latitude and day of year. For unmarried individuals, an additional day of poor overall mental health (of the last thirty days) decreases

Overview

The first essay explores the short term effects of mental health symptoms on employment outcomes. To address potential simultaneity bias, I propose a new instrument related to Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) that depends only on latitude and day of year. For unmarried individuals, an additional day of poor overall mental health (of the last thirty days) decreases the probability of employment by over five percentage points and increases the probability of unemployment by under five percentage points. Relative to instrumental variable models, ordinary least squares models underestimate the transition from employment to unemployment and out of the labor force due to mental health problems. The second essay examines the effects of changes in soft drink sales taxes on household soft drink expenditure. Exogenous variation in sales taxes across states allows for an unbiased estimate of the tax elasticity of expenditure on soft drinks and an inferred price elasticity of demand. After controlling for state and year fixed effects, a one percentage point tax rate increase induces an insignificant change in expenditure and demand, and a small but significant decrease in the probability of any expenditure. These results imply increased revenues available for nutrition education programs and are consistent with modestly reduced consumption. The third essay presents a model that splits health capital into two stocks, namely mental and physical health capital. Estimation of own and cross price responses of mental and physical health reveals a mixed set of interactive relationships, and I find little supporting evidence that the two forms of health are complementary in the utility or income functions. Also, an examination of the lifetime paths of health status and health care demand suggest that they have an inverse relationship for each form of health, but the paths themselves differ greatly between the two forms of health.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781243527011
Publisher:
BiblioLabsII
Publication date:
09/03/2011
Pages:
214
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.45(d)

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