Lights in the Sky: Identifying and Understanding Astronomical and Meteorological Phenomena / Edition 1

Lights in the Sky: Identifying and Understanding Astronomical and Meteorological Phenomena / Edition 1

by Michael Maunder
     
 

Amateur astronomers spend a lot of their time observing the sky, but not everything up there is necessarily an astronomical phenomenon. Nor is everything immediately identifiable. How many people can tell the difference between a Sun Dog and a Glory - both meteorological phenomena? Or between the Zodiacal Light and the Gegenschein, which are astronomical?

Lights

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Overview

Amateur astronomers spend a lot of their time observing the sky, but not everything up there is necessarily an astronomical phenomenon. Nor is everything immediately identifiable. How many people can tell the difference between a Sun Dog and a Glory - both meteorological phenomena? Or between the Zodiacal Light and the Gegenschein, which are astronomical?

Lights in the Sky is a truly comprehensive guide to observing, identifying, and imaging sky glows and other unusual atmospheric/astronomical phenomena, in both the night and daytime skies.

If, as a practical observer, you want to be able to identify what it is when you are faced, for example, with the Specter of the Brocken - or with an unidentified flying object that is...well, unidentified...then Lights in the Sky will provide all the practical scientific information you need.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781846285622
Publisher:
Springer London
Publication date:
11/28/2007
Series:
The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series
Edition description:
2007
Pages:
227
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

PART 1 - IDENTIFIER

Daylight

Diffuse phenomena

Point Sources

Dawn and Dusk

Diffuse phenomena

Point Sources

Night

Diffuse phenomena

Point Sources

PART 2 - ASTRONOMICAL AND METEOROLOGICAL PHENOMENA

Dawn: Zodiacal light Season for pre-dawn sighting

Red sky, Shepherd's warning

Crepuscular rays

Other dawn phenomena

Daylight: Haloes and coronas also detached arcs

Sundogs and mock suns (a special case of a halo)

Iridescence

Glories

Heiligenschein

Rainbows & fogbows

Dusk: Zodiacal light Season for twilight sightings

Red sky Shepherd's delight

Solar pillars

Green flash

Spectre of the Brocken

Mother of pearl clouds

Volcanic dust ( Krakatoa 1888, via El Chicon 1981 to Pinatubo 1990)

Other dust:

Bishop's ring, green & blue suns

Night: Light pollution

Milky Way

Messier objects

Caldwell objects

Gegenschein

Lunar haloes

Lunar rainbows

Aurorae

Nacreous clouds

Noctilucent clouds

Meteors

Other phenomena: marsh gas, fireflies &c

Anytime: Lightning,

Ball lightning

UFOs: Human perception

Mistaken identities

Astronomical and meteorological

Man-made

Extraterrestrial visitors?

Burden of proof

The Fermi paradox

Further Reading

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