Lila: An Inquiry into Morals

Lila: An Inquiry into Morals

4.3 10
by Maynard E. Pirsig, Robert M. Pirsig
     
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553078732
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/01/1991
Pages:
416

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Lila: An Inquiry into Morals 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lila is even better than Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. It is worth the time investment a hundred times over. I am a lifelong learner who reads as much as possible, and this is the best book I've ever read. It is thoughtful, valuable, and life-changing. It manages to totally reorient the way you understand reality in a deeply valuable way. Pirsig is truly a revolutionary philosopher. I had to put my pen down because I had the impulse to underline every passage!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pirsig/Phaedrus' further work on defining the undefinable 'quality' is not just an object called a book which you read subjectively. It is an experience in expanding your views of reality. While telling the story of Phaedrus and Lila, the book discusses American Indians, social anthropology, the history of science, and many other topics that shape our world today. Yet Pirsig leads you through the story from within the philosopher Phaedrus' mind. I would imagine that an outline for this book would be as long as the book itself -- but somehow, the information and thoughts just seem to flow naturally.

Read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance first -- better introduction is given there to the terminology he uses throughout Lila.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pirsig doesn't disappoint with the intriguing follow-up to 'Zen...Motorcycle Maintenance.' Further investigation leads Phaedrus to delve into the metaphysics of Quality, which ultimately underscores existence, and undermines the prevalent subject-object dichotomy of which we are accustomed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She pads in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Trots in and looks off the small ledge at a clearing below.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Almost as good as Zen and the Art