Lilith by George MacDonald | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Lilith

Lilith

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by George MacDonald
     
 

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After several strange occurrences, Mr. Vane believes his library is haunted. It is not until he is acquainted with the mysterious Mr. Raven that Mr. Vane learns of the magical world that lurks within his reach. Upon visiting this world with Mr. Raven, Mr. Vane encounters incredulous beings, some good, some dangerous. He witnesses many extraordinary things and

Overview

After several strange occurrences, Mr. Vane believes his library is haunted. It is not until he is acquainted with the mysterious Mr. Raven that Mr. Vane learns of the magical world that lurks within his reach. Upon visiting this world with Mr. Raven, Mr. Vane encounters incredulous beings, some good, some dangerous. He witnesses many extraordinary things and eventually, his hazardous journey leads him to find love and face death; ultimately he must decide between the two. This story is heavily influenced by Christian themes, as readers must wrestle with the concepts of death and salvation alongside Mr. Vane. This whimsical novel is a dark fantasy tale written for adult readers. Of his fantasy stories, George MacDonald claimed to write not necessarily for children, but for the child-like. MacDonald has been said to be one of the most influential fantasy writers of the 19th century, having inspired writers such as C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkein, and Madeline L'Engle.

Emmalon Davis
CCEL Staff Writer

This edition features an artistic cover, a new promotional introduction, and a hierarchical table of contents which makes it possible to navigate to any part of the book with a minimum of page turns.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013079731
Publisher:
Christian Classics Ethereal Library
Publication date:
08/25/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
818 KB

Meet the Author

George MacDonald - (1824-1905), Scottish novelist, clergyman and author
George Macdonald was born at Huntly, in the western part of Aberdeenshire on 10 December, 1824, the son of George Macdonald, farmer, and Helen MacKay. He was educated in country schools where Gaelic myths and Old Testament stories abounded. He then went on to Aberdeen University in the early 1840's obtaining awards in Moral Philosophy and Sciences. Next he studied for the Congregationalist ministry at Highbury College, London.

In 1850 he was made pastor at Arundel, West Sussex, England. MacDonald resigned however after three years of not living up to the congregational authorities’ expectations for more dogmatic sermons and being accused of heresy. Rejecting his Calvinist upbringing and doctrine of predestination, he came to believe in the divine presence but not divine providence and felt that everyone was capable of redemption.

George MacDonald married Louisa Powell in 1851 and they had six sons and five daughters together. One of their sons, Greville Macdonald would later become a writer himself and author a biography of his father. After a stay in Algiers to gain his health back MacDonald returned to England to tutor and write to provide for his ever-growing family and preach freelance when time permitted. Despite his successful career as a published writer he was continually forced to rely on the charity of his friends. Lady Byron was one such patron who assisted him until her death in 1860 as well as John Ruskin. MacDonald was mentor to C.S. Lewis; formed a strong friendship with Mark Twain after a tumultuous start and G. K. Chesterton, Henry Longfellow, and Walt Whitman were also counted among his friends. Some of his early poetry was Within and Without (1855) and Poems (1857), however his first real successes came with his Scottish country life stories such as David Elginbrod (1862), Alec Forbes (1865) and Robert Falconer (1868).

Louisa Powell died one year after her and George's golden wedding anniversary, in 1902. George Macdonald, after a long illness, died at Ashstead, Surrey, England on 18 September, 1905. His remains were cremated and they were taken to his beloved Bordighera for interment alongside his wife. A memorial to George MacDonald has been erected in the Drumblade Churchyard, Aberdeenshire.

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Lilith 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 589 reviews.
Holy-Quest More than 1 year ago
C.S. Lewis referred to George MacDonald as "his master." That's quite a compliment coming from an author as world-renowned and loved as C.S. Lewis. (It was my appreciation for Lewis and his appreciation for MacDonald that led me to begin reading MacDonald's works.) C.S. Lewis was not the only writer who was inspired by MacDonald; Lewis Carroll, W.H. Auden, G.K Chesterton, Mark Twain, Madeleine L'Engle, J.R.R. Tolkien, and E. Nesbit were also influenced by MacDonald's writing. Lilith is one of MacDonald's most intriguing, profound, and imaginative works. The story of Lilith is other-worldly, taking place in another dimension of time and space, but it reads more like a fantasy than a science-fiction novel. MacDonald takes stories of creation, myth, and death, and blends them all into a remarkable tale. The thread of this tale seems to wander, almost aimlessly at times, until the master-weaver sews it all together at the end for the reader. MacDonald's style of writing is not always easy for 21st century readers, but it is well-worth the effort. What I love most about MacDonald's romantic fantasies are the beautiful images he paints, the interwoven sub-plots, and the deep truths that under-gird his stories. His meandering style (mentioned above) helps me to lose myself in the story rather than trying to guess at where he might be going with every twist or turn. I also like the fact that you never really leave his stories behind. Instead, you go on thinking about them, returning to them, wondering and wandering about them. MacDonald's protagonists are continually stepping into and out of the present, everyday world and the fantastic, extraordinary other-world. I find this simply fascinating. If you are like stories that rich in imagination, you're likely to enjoy Lilith. (If you wish to add this book to your home library, I like the ones published by Johannesen best. They have a lovely binding and are facsimiles of the original printing. If you prefer paperback, then I recommend Eerdmans because they include C.S. Lewis' introduction.)
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