Lily and the Lost Boy

Lily and the Lost Boy

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by Paula Fox
     
 

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"Fox is unquestionably one of the most ambitious and skilled children's writers around. In this complex piece, she invokes the theme of Greek tragedy as she explores the life of a young American girl and boy during their family's stay on the tiny island of Thasos in Greece."—Booklist, starred review.

Newbery Medalist  See more details below

Overview

"Fox is unquestionably one of the most ambitious and skilled children's writers around. In this complex piece, she invokes the theme of Greek tragedy as she explores the life of a young American girl and boy during their family's stay on the tiny island of Thasos in Greece."—Booklist, starred review.

Newbery Medalist

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Fox writes her new novel in the understated, graceful style that won her the Newbery Medal and many other honors. The story exudes the atmosphere of a Grecian isle, Thasos, where the Corey family will spend a momentous summer. Lily (``almost 12'') and her brother Paul enjoy shared discoveries in the exotic locale, so different from home in New England, until Paul takes up with another American teenager, destructive Jack Hemmings. In light of the tragedy Jack causes, Lily sees that the boy is expected to care for himself by rejecting his neglectful parents. It's also through the girl's perceptions that the reader experiences a priceless heritage treasured by the villagers who have no ``modern conveniences'' or earthly goods. Theirs is a wealth indelibly impressed in scenes that describe daily life and a magical night at the theater, when the Coreys see Iphigeneia at Aulis at the same place where it was first performed 2000 years ago. A Richard Jackson Book. Ages 11-13. (August)
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 5-7 Another thought-provoking gem from Fox. Eleven-year-old Lily Corey, her parents, and her older brother are spending three months on the Greek island of Thasos while Mr. Corey finishes a book. Lily has been floweringenjoying her friendships with the islanders, her personal study of Greek mythology and archaeology, and her recent closeness with Paul (in their New England home town setting they were ``normal'' antagonistic siblings). But Lily's summer idyll ends when Paul becomes friendly with another American boy, Jack Hemmings. Jack is mysterious, erratic, defensive, self-destructive, and unloved. Lily resents his influence over Paul and the way in which he disrupts the even, satisfying flow of her lazy summer days. And yet Lily comes closer to an understanding of Jack than anyone, by sharing a catharthis in the young boy's life. Due to Jack's irresponsibility, the Corey's stay on the island ends with a tragedy that brings the family closer to their unsophisticated Greek friends even as it marks the beginning of a permanent separation. Lily and Paul leave their innocence on Thasos and take away a new awareness of human fragility and dignity. Fox has created a sensitive portrait of three young adolescents who achieve varying degrees of self-knowledge during their stay in an alien but hospitable culture. The story is very low keyed, with lengthy descriptions that capture the atmosphere of the Greek island but that also slow down the pace of the story. Simply written, with strong characterizations and overtones of Greek tragedy, Lily and the Lost Boy is an excellent choice for readers who share Lily's own budding characteristics: thoughtfulness, integrity, sensitivity, and courage. A beautifully written story for thoughtful readers. Tess McKellen, Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531057209
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
08/28/1987
Pages:
149
Product dimensions:
6.16(w) x 9.17(h) x 0.74(d)
Lexile:
840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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Lily and the Lost Boy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What will happen to Jack and Paul if they don¿t listen to their parents about not taking strangers on to cliffs? Read Lily and the Lost Boy by Paula Fox, to find out. Lily and Paul were kind, even though they were sometimes selfish. The main characters of my book were Jack, Paul, and Lily. They liked riding bicycles but didn¿t listen to their parents. I also don¿t think that they were smart because they thought that human Americans were the same as snakes because they thought that snakes could think and could wear clothes. The book Lily and the Lost Boy was about 3 kids that liked to ride bicycles. They wouldn¿t listen to their parents about giving strangers rides to the cliffs. They had some semi problems with family and/or friends. Jack, who was an American, changed how Paul and Lily thought and act because he taught them many things. By the way Jack was the ¿lost boy¿ of this story that in some way saved and helped people¿s lives. I liked this historical fiction book because you didn¿t want to stop reading it. I also liked it because it had lots of interesting parts + good feelings. To me the characters in the book helped each other by trying to solve one another¿s problems. My favorite part of the story was when they rode the bicycles because I like to ride bicycles.