Lima Bean Monster

Lima Bean Monster

by Dan Yaccarino, Adam McCauley
     
 

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Is eating your vegetables the only way to save the world?!

Sammy hates lima beans despite the fact that he has never eaten a single one in his entire life. He has become a master of finding ways to avoid his lima beans. His latest and greatest scheme is sneaking them out of the house (in his sock!) and burying them in a hole in the ground. When the neighborhood

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Overview

Is eating your vegetables the only way to save the world?!

Sammy hates lima beans despite the fact that he has never eaten a single one in his entire life. He has become a master of finding ways to avoid his lima beans. His latest and greatest scheme is sneaking them out of the house (in his sock!) and burying them in a hole in the ground. When the neighborhood kids hear about it, they quickly join in, adding their unwanted vegetables.

One night there is a terrible storm, and a monster is born! A monster made of Sammy's lima beans! Who will save the town? Who will rescue all the HUMAN beans from the rampaging lima bean monster?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this mock-horror yarn about leftover veggies, evil greens terrorize a community. The trouble starts when lima-bean-hating Sammy stows his side dish in his sock when his mother isn't looking. He runs outside "with a sock full of hot, squishy beans," and with a fiendish grin, he buries the evidence. "Soon all the kids in the neighborhood were throwing their brussels sprouts, parsnips, and lima beans down into the hole," along with "ugly birthday sweaters, failed spelling tests, tap shoes and even an accordion." The succotash hits the fan one stormy night, when lightning strikes the heap and a bumpy face with lima-bean-shaped eyes and a broccoli nose rises from the earth, roaring, "Me want some human beans!" The only way to stop a legume creature is to eat it, and McCauley (My Friend Chicken) provides a hilarious image of vicious children digging their teeth into the gooey green golem. Yaccarino (Oswald the Octopus) sometimes reiterates what the pictures convey wordlessly. But the slimy beast ("It stank of lima beans and sweaty socks! Yuck!") has surefire gross-out appeal and no hollow pretensions of nutritional value. Even bean-proponents may push their plates away after this comical serving suggestion. Ages 4-8. (Aug.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Sammy hates lima beans no matter how his mother cooks them. Eventually, he discovers a method for hiding those crummy vegetables in his sock and later burying them in a vacant lot down the street. Soon all of the neighborhood kids are burying their unwanted foods in the very same lot. One night, during a huge rainstorm, a giant smelly lima bean monster emerges from the ground of the vacant lot. He stomps through the neighborhood and is about to eat the "human beans" when Sammy gets an idea. All of the kids must join together in an effort to save their parents from the rampaging monster. Mixed media on watercolor paper is used to create the illustrations for this amusing and light-hearted book. 2001, Walker Publishing, $16.85 and $15.95. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer:Denise Daley
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Sammy, who hates lima beans, discovers the perfect solution for emptying his plate. Surreptitiously, he slips the offensive items into his sock and buries them in a vacant lot. Before long, all of his friends catch on and dump their vegetables there as well, along with other things they dislike. One night, during a thunderstorm, the mound of dirt, now grown big and tall, is struck by lightning and out crawls a Lima Bean Monster that scoops up all the adults in the neighborhood. In a desperate attempt to save them from being eaten, Sammy and the other children surround the creature and begin nibbling on him until he is finally all gone. Zesty, full-page, retro-style illustrations enliven the fast-paced story, which has surefire appeal for youngsters who won't touch vegetables (as well as for those who do like them).-Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Yaccarino (Oswald, p. 670, etc.) is a champion of the tomfool and he is in fine form in this little piece of ridiculousness that concerns a young boy, Sammy, who can't stomach lima beans. Literally. He tries to hide them under the mashed potatoes, shovel them to the dog under the table (no dice, says Blackie), secret them in his napkin. His mother always finds them, and serves up even more. A solution comes via Sammy's socks, where he deposits the beans and his mother fails to look. His mother happily assumes he's eaten them and Sammy makes a beeline for a vacant lot where he buries the offending item. A friend notices Sammy at work and helps him by tossing in some broccoli; soon other kids are contributing failed school tests and ugly sweaters and yet more vegetables. Judgment Day comes when a bolt of lightning hits the now sizable mound, transforming the dump into a horrible lima bean monster-big, green, covered with bits of broccoli, an accordion, and that sweater. The monster is about to munch Sammy when the smart lad points out that his science teacher, who is trying to make a fast getaway, would make a bigger and better meal. Soon the monster has grabbed every grown-up around. Salvation comes when the kids decide to eat their vegetables-the monster-lima beans included (but not the ugly sweater). The admonition to "eat your vegetables" gets the drubbing every kid feels it richly deserves; vegetables really are as evil as they think. Bug-eyed, jazzed-up art invests the cockamamie story with all the zest it can handle, starting with a plate of very angry-looking beans on the title page. A little forced, but the theme has definite appeal. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802787767
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
01/01/2001
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 10.24(h) x 0.46(d)
Lexile:
AD510L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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