The Limits of Ethics in International Relations: Natural Law, Natural Rights, and Human Rights in Transition

The Limits of Ethics in International Relations: Natural Law, Natural Rights, and Human Rights in Transition

by David Boucher
     
 

Ethical constraints on relations among individuals within and between societies have always reflected or invoked a higher authority than the caprices of human will. For over two thousand years Natural Law and Natural Rights were the constellations of ideas and presuppositions that fulfilled this role in the west, and exhibited far greater similarities than most

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Overview

Ethical constraints on relations among individuals within and between societies have always reflected or invoked a higher authority than the caprices of human will. For over two thousand years Natural Law and Natural Rights were the constellations of ideas and presuppositions that fulfilled this role in the west, and exhibited far greater similarities than most commentators want to admit. Such ideas were the lens through which Europeans evaluated the rest of the world. In his major new book David Boucher rejects the view that Natural Rights constituted a secularization of Natural Law ideas by showing that most of the significant thinkers in the field, in their various ways, believed that reason leads you to the discovery of your obligations, while God provides the ground for discharging them. Furthermore, The Limits of Ethics in International Relations maintains that Natural Rights and Human Rights are far less closely related than is often asserted because Natural Rights never cast adrift the religious foundationalism, whereas Human Rights, for the most part, have jettisoned the Christian metaphysics upon which both Natural Law and Natural Rights depended. Human Rights theories, on the whole, present us with foundationless universal constraints on the actions of individuals, both domestically and internationally. Finally, one of the principal contentions of the book is that these purportedly universal rights and duties almost invariably turn out to be conditional, and upon close scrutiny end up being 'special' rights and privileges as the examples of multicultural encounters, slavery and racism, and women's rights demonstrate.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199203529
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
07/26/2009
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. Classical Natural Law and the Law of Nations: The Greeks and The Romans
2. Christian Natural Law
3. Natural Law, The Law of Nations and the Transition to Natural Rights
4. Natural Rights and Social Exclusion: Cultural Encounters
5. Natural Rights: Descriptive and Prescriptive
6. Natural Rights and Their Critics
7. Slavery and Racism in Natural Law and Natural Rights
8. Nonsense Upon Stilts? Tocqueville, Idealism and the Expansion of the Moral Community
9. The Human Rights Culture and its Discontents
10. Modern Constitutive Theories of Human Rights
11. Human Rights and the Juridical Revolutions
12. Women and Human Rights
Conclusion
References

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