The Limits of Hope: An Adoptive Mother's Story / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 94%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $5.46   
  • Used (20) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$5.46
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(991)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1997-07-29 Hardcover New New Item. Item delivered via UPS in 7-9 business days. Tracking available by request Ships from US. Please allow 1-3 weeks for delivery outside US.

Ships from: Appleton, WI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$17.34
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(9)

Condition: New
Hard back book New with jacket*[RED ] Unmarked*Ships securely* All merchandise is fully guaranteed* Buy from a professional company that cares about your satisfaction*G

Ships from: Warrington, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$18.00
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(11)

Condition: New
266pp.; HB quarter-bound red&blk. NEW! Still in Shrinkwrap! DJ blk.&red NEW! Still in shrinkwrap! Adopting troubled children.

Ships from: Truth or Consequence, NM

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

"Adopting a child is an act of love. When that child is no longer an infant but has a history of abuse and neglect, integrating it into an existing family is a challenge. Loux tells the story of her family's decision to adopt two sisters removed from their alcoholic biological mother. The adoption agency refused to provide any history of the children's birth parents, though both girls had major psychosocial and genetic problems that caused great stress for the adoptive family. This personal account tells of Loux's attempt to raise these girls along with her three biological children. Unfortunately, it is full of self-pity and guilt. The most interesting part is the conclusion, where she suggests alternatives to traditional adoption for the care of troubled older children."—Library Journal

University of Virginia Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The popular view of adoption is that children are rescued from unhappy situations, given loving homes, and grow and prosper. While this undoubtedly happens, Loux's courageous story of an adoption tragedy appears to be all too common. With three biological children and a stable family situation, the author and her husband rather impulsively adopted two girls, aged four and three, whom they later learned came from a background of extreme abuse and neglect. The book follows the Louxes' increasing hopelessness and despair as the girls fail to develop normally. Problems with family, peers and the school system increase as the girls progress into and through adolescence. The author, a college English professor, writes well and with feeling. Her presentation can be jarring, however; although Loux had "50 plus pages of single-spaced monologues that [she] took down immediately after those conversations took place," the presence of these verbatim conversations 20 years after the fact, and of the small details of life usually beyond memory's capture, still feels strained. Loux's basic argumentof the need for changes in adoption procedures, for agency education and for follow-ups to aid adopting familiesis compelling. The girls, now in their 20s, continue to be troubled, lending a poignant credence to the book's title. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Adopting a child is an act of love. When that child is no longer an infant but has a history of abuse and neglect, integrating it into an existing family is a challenge. Loux tells the story of her family's decision to adopt two sisters removed from their alcoholic biological mother. The adoption agency refused to provide any history of the children's birth parents, though both girls had major psychosocial and genetic problems that caused great stress for the adoptive family. This personal account tells of Loux's attempt to raise these girls along with her three biological children. Unfortunately, it is full of self-pity and guilt. The most interesting part is the conclusion, where she suggests alternatives to traditional adoption for the care of troubled older children. Gregory Keck and Regina M. Kipecky's Adopting the Hurt Child LJ 10/1/95, which offers practical advice for adoptive parents in this situation, is a more useful book. An optional purchase.Barbara M. Bibel, Oakland P.L., Cal.
Booknews
An adoptive mother tells the story of her family's adoption of two abused sisters and the traumatic years that followed as the preschool girls grew into troubled adolescents. She challenges the notion that a stable home environment is always the best answer for abused or neglected children. For general readers. No index. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Kirkus Reviews
An adoptive mother's agonizing account of her efforts to parent two troubled siblings.

Loux (English/St. Mary's Coll.) challenges the notion that a nurturing environment can overcome genetic temperament and early deprivation. After giving birth to three healthy children, she and her husband decided that they would like to give a home to disadvantaged children. Dissuaded by the prejudices of their parents from embracing a biracial or Asian child, the Louxs adopted Margey and Dawn, three- and four-year-old white children from a local Catholic agency. From early on, the girls were unable to integrate successfully into the Loux family. As youngsters, their impulsive and erratic behavior impaired their ability to function in school or in any social context. Impetuous and reckless, both girls wrought havoc on the lives of the Louxs and their other children. As Margey entered her teens, she turned to drug abuse, lawlessness, and indiscriminate sex. She now works as a prostitute to support a drug habit and—despite stints in and out of jail—is, Loux says, "much happier with her life than [when] she was living with our family, and probably happier now than in any of the scenarios I wanted for her." Dawn, too, left home early and is currently grappling with her young husband to raise two developmentally disabled children with minimal financial resources. Their mother contends that her harrowing experiences in raising "hard to place" children, whosebackgrounds were shielded from her, are far from unique. Loux questions the wisdom of adoptive policies that do not prepare parents for the realities of raising high-risk children and goes so far as to propose that children like Margey or Dawn might do better if raised in group homes.

A forceful and disturbing memoir, but the reader doesn't get a full damage report on Margey's and Dawn's impact on the author's marriage and biological children.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813917108
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/1997
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 280
  • Product dimensions: 6.25 (w) x 9.23 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2001

    Truthfull and Heartbreaking

    This true story is absolutely moving. It is full of pain and struggle, yet somehow it is comforting. I've had the honor of knowing Mrs. Loux, and to truly understand that the woman standing before me actually went through such a trial of life. I was adopted and although I didn't have near the amount of difficulties and Loux did, I could relate to it unbelievably. Definately a tear-jerker.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)