The Limits of Independence: American Women 1760- 1800 by Marylynn Salmon, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Limits of Independence: American Women 1760-1800

The Limits of Independence: American Women 1760-1800

by Marylynn Salmon
     
 

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The second half of the 18th century saw a handful of English colonies transform themselves into a nation. This process involved not only a revolution against the British crown but also the uniting of a diverse population; in addition to the English and Africans who made up the bulk of the population, people from continental Europe had to become willing to join in

Overview

The second half of the 18th century saw a handful of English colonies transform themselves into a nation. This process involved not only a revolution against the British crown but also the uniting of a diverse population; in addition to the English and Africans who made up the bulk of the population, people from continental Europe had to become willing to join in the creation of the new republic. Tradition dictated that the independent male citizen was the most important actor in this drama, but women's contributions to the war effort and support of the political ideals of the era were essential to the survival of the new United States.
The first obligation of a women—to God and to country—was to marry and bear children. The lives of the 18th-century white women were filled with the numerous demands of child care and housekeeping. African-American women faced the same demands, but found their ability to care for their families sharply limited by their lives as slaves, while Native American women often saw their families and tribes destroyed when whites seized their lands in the name of the federal government. But there were other forces at work during this turbulent period as the community of women addressed issues of educational reform, the abolition of slavery in the North and renewed embrace of it in the South, voting rights, religion, the rise of prominent women intellectuals, and the ever-changing relationships between women and men.
The poet Phillis Wheatley, the writer and educator Susanna Rowson, and other women—both well known and unsung—fill the pages of The Limits of Independence. The book looks at the traditional patterns of women's lives during the time of the American Revolution and charts the new directions to come as women help to carve a new nation "dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal."

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Ideal for class discussions, this volume will be useful for reports and leisure reading. It may even have the power to make history bugs of heretofore uninterested students."—School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Illustrated with current, often moving, photographs of working children from around the world, this nine-section book defines child and child labor, explores the whys and wheres, the kinds of work children do, children's rights, and ways children might become activists. The book discusses all kinds of child labor, from exploited rug weavers in Pakistan and Nepal, to migrant workers in the US, and "sex workers" throughout the world. Most examples are chosen from "Third World" countries; other North American examples include statements from a Canadian sex worker and a fast food worker; few US examples are given. Numerous teenagers are profiled, many in their own words giving a picture of what it is like to work under unfair, unfree, un-unionized, or other conditions. The book makes a distinction between children or teenagers working in non-exploitive conditions or within a home or neighborhood and those in virtual bondage to their crafts. Numerous charts present statistics in clear graphics. The ending chapters lay out the dangerous working conditions of various types of work and the possible effects on children, children's rights, and some things being done to call attention to child labor abuses. Well-intentioned, this treatment of a troubling topic may not find an easy place in the curriculum. Middle school and highschool libraries with a demand for international studies books,however, will find this a useful treatment of a global problem. Index, related readings, and a glossary are included. l997. Groundwood, Ages 12-up, $16.95. Reviewer: Susan Hepler

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195081251
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Series:
Young Oxford History of Women in the United States Series, #3
Edition description:
ILLUSTRATE
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
7.81(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

About the Author:
Marylynn Salmon is the author of Women and the Law of Property in Early American and co-author of Inheritance in America: From Colonial Times to the Present, as well as numerous scholarly articles on early American women's history. Dr. Salmon is research associate in the history department at Smith College and director of the Smith Summer Humanities Program.

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