Lincoln and Seward by Gideon Welles, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Lincoln And Seward

Lincoln And Seward

by Gideon Welles
     
 

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This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781163654637
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing Company
Publication date:
09/10/2010
Pages:
220
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.63(d)

Read an Excerpt


Mr. Lincoln And Mr. IT is to be regretted that Mr. Charles Francis Adams, in his "Memorial Address on the Life, Character, and Services of William H. Seward," should have permitted himself to do injustice to Abraham Lincoln. Any attempt to canonize Mr. Seward by detracting from the merits of his chief weakens the encomiums bestowed. Mr. Adams has claims to consideration by reason of his talents, acquirements, social position, and public service; but his estimate of the character, capacity, executive ability, and relative position of the Chief Magistrate and his Secretary of State betrays a want of just discrimination and correct knowledge of each. A greater error could scarcely be committed than to represent that Mr. Lincoln "had to deal with a superior intelectual power" when he came in contact with Mr. Seward. The reverse was the fact. In mere scholastic acquirements " Mr. Seward, never a learned man," may have had the advantage, though in this respect there was less difference than is generally supposed ; while " in breadth of philosophical experience and in the force of moral discipline" the almost self-taught and reflective mind of Mr. Linco.lh,';.which surmounted difficulties and dis- advantages.tlral) his Secretary never knew, conspicuously excelled,. .'.'In the executive council and in measures of administration the Secretary had influence, not ahvays.h'jppily exercised; but the President's was the master mind. It is empty panegyric to speak of the Secretary of State as chief, or to say his suggestions, . isiife' in his own department, were more regarded or -'faandd even greater influence than those of others. His ''restless activity, unceasing labors, showy manifestations,and sometimes incautious exercise of questionable authority which the President deemed it impo...

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