Lincoln's Last Days: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever

( 69 )

Overview

Lincoln's Last Days deftly recounts one of the most dramatic stories in American history—of how one gunshot changed the country forever. With more than 1.5 million copies sold of Killing Lincoln, this young readers edition is sure to expand the readership even further.

In Lincoln's Last Days, Bill O'Reilly masterfully adapts his historical thriller to appeal to a younger audience. Shorter text and lavishly illustrated with period photographs, maps, and art make this is an ...

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Lincoln's Last Days: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever

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Overview

Lincoln's Last Days deftly recounts one of the most dramatic stories in American history—of how one gunshot changed the country forever. With more than 1.5 million copies sold of Killing Lincoln, this young readers edition is sure to expand the readership even further.

In Lincoln's Last Days, Bill O'Reilly masterfully adapts his historical thriller to appeal to a younger audience. Shorter text and lavishly illustrated with period photographs, maps, and art make this is an inviting and accessible book for young readers, and one sure to engross kids in this period of American history.

As far from a dusty history tome as one can get, both adults and children will find this lavishly illustrated volume irresistible on its own, or as a compelling companion to Killing Lincoln.

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Editorial Reviews

author of The Lion and The Gold Coast on Killing L Nelson DeMille

As a history major, I wish my required reading had been as well written as this truly vivid and emotionally engaging account of Lincoln's assassination. And as a former combat infantry officer, I found myself running for cover at the Civil War battle scenes. This is the story of an American tragedy that changed the course of history. If you think you know this story, you don't until you've read Killing Lincoln. Add historian to Bill O'Reilly's already impressive résumé.
New York Post on Killing Lincoln

[Killing Lincoln] is nonfiction, albeit told in white-knuckled, John Grisham-like style.
Newsweek on Killing Lincoln Peter J. Boyer

If Grisham wrote a novel about April 1865 . . . it might well read like Killing Lincoln.
author of American Assassin on Killing Lincoln Vince Flynn

Killing Lincoln is a must read historical thriller. Bill O'Reilly recounts the dramatic events of the spring of 1865 with such exhilarating immediacy that you will feel like you are walking the streets of Washington DC on the night that John Wilkes Booth shot Abraham Lincoln. This is a hugely entertaining, heart-stopping read.
The Christian Science Monitor on Killing Lincoln

[Killing Lincoln] delivers a taut, action-packed narrative with cliff-hangers aplenty.
Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
Bill O'Reilly is a noted conservative television and print commentator but what many people may not know is that in his earlier years he was a history teacher. Over the past year O'Reilly has received critical praise for his historical monograph Killing Lincoln, which detailed the events leading up to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. In Lincoln's Last Days O'Reilly and Dwight Zimmerman recreate that research and study in a version of their previous work aimed at a younger audience. As was the case with their more comprehensive historical monograph, Lincoln's Last Days provides readers with a highly informative look back at one of the darkest crimes in American history. In order to do this sad tale justice, O'Reilly and Zimmerman take their readers back to a time when the Civil War had ended but not the evil machinations that provoked it. In telling this story the authors combine an eye for historical detail with fascinating portraits of the parties involved in Lincoln's death. The juxtaposition of Booth and his conspirators who acted with tragically flawed energy aimed at a terrible result, with President Lincoln's stoicism in the face of the heaviest responsibility imaginable represents the core of this book's narrative. As the pages turn the reader almost wishes that Booth will fail but historical facts cannot be changed and the clock may not be turned back. Booth succeeded in his flawed mission and the course of American history was changed. Successful as well are the authors of this swift aced and well written illustrated history that does justice to one of the saddest days in the nation's saga. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
From the Publisher
“This thrillerlike adaptation captures the excitement of the Union victory in the Civil War and the shock and horror that quickly followed as the country learned of Lincoln’s death and sought revenge on his assassins. The popularity of O’Reilly’s adult title will drive interest in this version, but it definitely stands alone and will find an audience among general readers and report writers.” —School Library Journal

“Accessible to younger readers.” —Booklist

Praise for Killing Lincoln:

“As a history major, I wish my required reading had been as well written as this truly vivid and emotionally engaging account of Lincoln’s assassination. And as a former combat infantry officer, I found myself running for cover at the Civil War battle scenes. This is the story of an American tragedy that changed the course of history. If you think you know this story, you don’t until you’ve read Killing Lincoln. Add historian to Bill O’Reilly’s already impressive résumé.” —Nelson DeMille, author of The Lion and The Gold Coast

Killing Lincoln is a must-read historical thriller. Bill O’Reilly recounts the dramatic events of the spring of 1865 with such exhilarating immediacy that you will feel like you are walking the streets of Washington DC on the night that John Wilkes Booth shot Abraham Lincoln. This is a hugely entertaining, heart-stopping read.” —Vince Flynn, author of American Assassin

“If Grisham wrote a novel about April 1865 . . . it might well read like Killing Lincoln.” —Peter J. Boyer, Newsweek

“[Killing Lincoln] delivers a taut, action-packed narrative with cliff-hangers aplenty.” —The Christian Science Monitor

“[Killing Lincoln] is nonfiction, albeit told in white-knuckled, John Grisham-like style.” —New York Post

author of American Assassin Vince Flynn

Killing Lincoln is a must-read historical thriller. Bill O'Reilly recounts the dramatic events of the spring of 1865 with such exhilarating immediacy that you will feel like you are walking the streets of Washington DC on the night that John Wilkes Booth shot Abraham Lincoln. This is a hugely entertaining, heart-stopping read.
The Christian Science Monitor

[Killing Lincoln] delivers a taut, action-packed narrative with cliff-hangers aplenty.
author of The Lion and The Gold Coast Nelson DeMille

As a history major, I wish my required reading had been as well written as this truly vivid and emotionally engaging account of Lincoln's assassination. And as a former combat infantry officer, I found myself running for cover at the Civil War battle scenes. This is the story of an American tragedy that changed the course of history. If you think you know this story, you don't until you've read Killing Lincoln. Add historian to Bill O'Reilly's already impressive résumé.
Newsweek Peter J. Boyer

If Grisham wrote a novel about April 1865 . . . it might well read like Killing Lincoln.
New York Post

[Killing Lincoln] is nonfiction, albeit told in white-knuckled, John Grisham-like style.
School Library Journal
Gr 5–9—This skillfully abridged and adapted edition of O'Reilly's Killing Lincoln (Holt, 2011) retains the format of the adult title with brief chapters written in a present tense, "you are there" style. It opens in the often-chaotic closing days of the Civil War, capturing the jubilation following Lee's surrender, the events of Lincoln's last days, and Booth's obsessive hatred of Lincoln and his conspiracy to assassinate him. It then describes the shooting and Lincoln's final hours and death, the manhunt for Booth and his allies, Booth's death, and the speedy trial and execution of his coconspirators. An afterword relates the fates of other important figures, and appendixes include a "Lincoln's World" that provides facts about aspects of the Civil War, time lines, and Lincoln-related Washington, DC, locations. Well-captioned illustrations, which include maps and period photos of the major players and significant locations, appear on almost every page and are both informative and interesting. This thrillerlike adaptation captures the excitement of the Union victory in the Civil War and the shock and horror that quickly followed as the country learned of Lincoln's death and sought revenge on his assassins. The popularity of O'Reilly's adult title will drive interest in this version, but it definitely stands alone and will find an audience among general readers and report writers. Chasing Lincoln's Killer (Scholastic, 2009), the YA version of James L. Swanson's adult best-seller, is more narrowly focused on the conspiracy and the massive manhunt for Booth.—Mary Mueller, formerly at Rolla Junior High School, MO
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805096750
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 8/21/2012
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 73,451
  • Age range: 10 - 15 Years
  • Lexile: 1020L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.38 (w) x 9.14 (h) x 1.01 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill O'Reilly

Bill O’Reilly is the anchor of The O’Reilly Factor, the highest-rated cable news show in the country. He is the author of several number-one bestselling books.

 

Dwight Jon Zimmerman has adapted books for young readers by distinguished authors such as Dee Brown and James McPherson. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Read an Excerpt

The man with six weeks to live is anxious.

He furls his brow and walks out of the Capitol Building, which is nearing completion. Fifty thousand men and women stand in pouring rain and ankle-deep mud to watch Abraham Lincoln take the oath of office to begin his second term. His new vice president, Andrew Johnson, has just delivered a red-faced, drunken, twenty-minute ramble vilifying the South that has left the crowd squirming, embarrassed by Johnson's inebriation.

So when Lincoln steps up to the podium and delivers an eloquent appeal for reunification, the spiritual message of his second inaugural address is all the more uplifting. "With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations," the president intones humbly.

Suddenly, the sun bursts through the clouds as he speaks, its light enveloping the tall and outwardly serene Lincoln. But 120 miles away in the Virginia railroad junction of Petersburg, any thought of serenity is a fantasy.

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Table of Contents

A Note to Readers ix

Key Players xii

Prologue xvi

Part 1 The Beginning of the End of the War 1

Part 2 The Conspiracy to Assassinate 59

Part 3 Lincoln's Last Day 93

Part 4 Chasing the Assassins 185

Afterword 240

Lincoln's World

A Walk Through Washington, D.C., in the 1860s 256

Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, and Their Children 260

The Aging of Abraham Lincoln 265

Did You Know?

Twenty Important and Interesting Facts About the Civil War 266

Transportation During the Civil War 273

Flags of the Civil War 275

Weapons of the Civil War 277

Medicine During the Civil War 280

Abraham Lincoln Time Line 283

John Wilkes Booth Time Line 289

Washington, D.C.

Finding Lincoln in the Nation's Capital Today 291

Military Terms 297

Bibliography 300

Recommended Reading 302

Recommended Websites 304

Recommended Viewing 306

Index 307

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Reading Group Guide

Part One: The Beginning of the End of the War (pages 1-58)

1. Explain why the Battle of Petersburg was a turning point in the war.
2. State why Ulysses S. Grant was Lincoln's favorite general.
3. Interpret the reason the Confederate army laid waste to Richmond, Virginia. Why was the first
American flag flown there after its capture symbolic of the future?
4. Classify the treatment that the Union army and President Lincoln faced from both its black and white citizens.
5. Analyze why Robert E. Lee and his troops lost hope at Amelia Court House. What decisions did
Lee make?
6. List all of Lee's challenges in Virginia, then rank them, in your opinion, from most important to least.
As a class debate the results.
7. Explain why High Bridge was so important to both North and South strategies for success.
8. Diagram Colonel Francis Washburn's strategy when faced with a battle where he was clearly outnumbered by calvary and foot soldiers. Why did his bold plan fail?
9. Choose a winner in the battle to secure the town of Marshall's Crossroads. Defend your choice with proof from the text.
10. Justify Lee's decision to utter the most despicable word to a military leader: surrender.
11. Interpret Grant's generous terms he offered Lee and his Confederate troops while at Appomattox
Court House. Do you think these terms were already negotiated with Lincoln or not? Why?
12. List ten of the most important facts every American ought to know about this important part of our history. Discuss and refine your choices with a partner.

Part Two: The Conspiracy to Assassinate (pages 59-91)

1. Describe the mood in Washington, D.C., after news of Lee's surrender has been reported.
2. Characterize the relationship and connection that John Wilkes Booth had to Jefferson Davis. Compare his original intentions with his new plan.
3. Determine why the content of Lincoln's speech so inflamed Booth and his comrades.
4. Discuss the three different elements that convinced Lincoln he would die in office. How did he decide to live with that fear?
5. Outline Booth's expanded plan. What purpose did it serve? Who was brought into the plot? Why?
6. Argue whether you think Lincoln or Grant was more beloved to the residents of Washington, D.C.
What about at the national level?
7. For general discussion: What evidence and sources does the author use to substantiate his claims in the text? Which sources are best to use for historical research such as this one? How do you evaluate the authenticity of a source?

Part Three: Lincoln's Last Days (pages 93-184)

1. Describe Lincoln's last morning. What does this reveal about his character?
2. Propose a list of reasons Lincoln decided to attend the theater on the fateful night of April 14. How could one decision have changed history?
3. Why were people at Ford's Theatre excited that the Lincolns would be in attendance? Who else was happy with the news?
4. How was Lincoln's last cabinet meeting a good example of his leadership skills and style?
5. List the steps Booth took to set his plan into action. How and why did he attempt revenge on John Matthews?
6. Evaluate the role security played in the president's assassination. In what ways was this an area of weakness?
7. Explain why Lewis Powell was the only member of the conspiracy who was actually qualified to pull off his part of the plan. What did he do? How did his part turn out?
8. In detail, what was Booth's elaborate plan? What Latin words did he use to mark his dramatic exit? Did he have any misgivings about his goal?
9. How was Booth able to gain easy access in the theater and ultimately the president? Why was this allowed?
10. Summarize Powell's vicious attack on Secretary of State Seward and his family. What part of the plan succeeded, if any? What failed? Why?
11. Examine George Atzerodt's actions the night of the assassination. Defend whether you think he was still as complicit or as guilty as the other members of the conspiracy.
12. Did everything go exactly as Booth planned in the theater? What complications did he face with his evil plan?
13. At the drawbridge, mentioned on page 160, why did sentry Silas Cobb allow the riders to cross the bridge though he stated, "But I don't know I ought to"? Have you ever regretted doing something that you felt was wrong but did it anyway?
14. Also on page 160 the authors note that "When the war started in 1861, a curfew was established around the capital and strictly enforced." Discuss with students why this was done and its significance. You may also want to relate and discuss how and why this was done in other wars including World War II.
15. How did young Dr. Charles Leale attempt to save Lincoln? Did any of these techniques seem absurd or familiar in any way?
16. What did the famous actress, Laura Keene, do in the theater once she heard Lincoln was shot? Why? What might have been her motives? What were the repercussions?
17. Defend the choices the doctor and Lincoln's closest associates made about his care and removal from Ford's Theatre. What guided their decisions? Why was it ironic Lincoln died in the particular room that he did?
18. Do you think all the people who entered Lincoln's room and stood vigil at his passing could predict the significance of the event at the time? In your opinion, what would have been the worst part? How was Mrs.Lincoln treated during this episode? Why?

Part Four: Chasing the Assassins (pages 185-239)

1. Reconstruct the steps the investigators took to gather evidence in the case of Lincoln's assassination and Seward's attempted murder. What locations did they focus on? Who did they believe were the key players? Were they correct on all counts?
2. Why did Dr. Samuel Mudd provide medical attention to Booth? What ailed him? How could it have spoiled all his plans? Do you think Mudd was as guilty as Booth and the others? Should he have faced the same consequences or not? Why?
3. Discuss Lafayette Baker's connection to the investigation. How much credit should have been given to him? Why? Who deserved the most credit? Why?

4. In your opinion, who was guiltier of collusion: Dr. Mudd (and his wife) or Thomas Jones? Why? Who else helped the fugitives?
5. Explain why Booth was disappointed by the accounts of the tragedy in the newspaper. How did he hope to counteract those reports?
6. Trace the steps that led to Lewis Powell being taken into custody. How was coincidence a key to the authorities bringing him to justice? Who else did it implicate?
7. Debate whether communication was a barrier to the investigation or not. What technology was used to aid it? What hindered communication?
8. Describe the plan Dr. Mudd intended to follow based on his answers to investigators' questions. Why did the plan fail?
9. George Atzerodt's part was nearly undetected. What mistakes lead to his capture?
10. Describe the funeral rites for President Lincoln. Where is his final resting place? Why? How was his journey there symbolic?
11. Why did detective Lafayette Baker believe John Wilkes Booth's only hope to escape was through Kentucky?What is a hunch? When should you follow one?
12. Summarize the steps that Lieutenant Luther Baker and Colonel Everton Conger took to bring Booth to justice. Why were they sent to Virginia? What motivated these two soldiers?
13. Describe the events as they unfolded at the Garrett Farm. How were Booth and David Herold captured?
14. Evaluate what the sentences given to the conspirators involved. Did each one deserve the death penalty? Who did many people think should have been pardoned or at least spared the death penalty? Do you agree?

Afterword (pages 240-255)

How do the authors present the facts concerning Booth's body? Why are there still theories about its location? How do the authors dismiss theories that Booth not only survived but escaped? What choices must historians make about conflicting facts?

Summarize the legacies of each of the major players in Lincoln's assassination in a single sentence, including his own family. Which one surprised you the most? Who do you think suffered the most from his loss? Include the section on Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, and Their Children (pages 260-263).

Lincoln's World (pages 256-265)

A Walk Through W ashington, D.C., in the 1860s (pages 256-259)

Compare and contrast the Washington, D.C., of the 1860s to today's national capital, using both the description in this section, and the maps on pages 257 and 292. Would you want to live during the momentous time in America's history described in the book or not? Would you like to live there or visit now? Which sites would you most like to see in D.C.?

Did You Know? (pages 266-282)

Twenty Important and Interesting Facts About the Civil W ar (pages 266-272)

Review this section in small groups and discuss the following questions: Which of these facts did you find most interesting? Why? How do you think the author authenticated these facts? What sources do you think he used?
Which fact would you want to explore in more detail? Where would you go to look for more information regarding this topic? Would it be a primary or a secondary source?
Have a debate about this section of the book. Which facts are easiest to substantiate? When are facts considered the truth and not just a theory? Which of these facts would you consider true? Which could still be debated? In their groups, allow students only a half hour in the library to try to substantiate or authenticate one of the facts. Discuss the reliability of their sources.

Transportation During the Civil W ar (pages 273-274)

How would your life, including your hobbies and friendships, be different without the technology and transportation options you've come to depend upon?

Flags of the Civil W ar (pages 275-276)

Why are flags important? Why did the Confederate flag go through so many different designs? Were you surprised to learn that the Stars and Bars was never the official flag of the South but only a battle flag?

Weapons of the Civil W ar (pages 277-279)

How did the technology of warfare change during the Civil War? How did it work in the favor of the North?

Medicine During the Civil War (pages 280-282)

How was the practice of medicine during the Civil War closer to medical care in the Middle Ages than to care today?
What implications did this have for soldiers? Would it have made a difference to Lincoln himself?

Time Lines (pages 283-290)

Have students compare the time lines of Lincoln and Booth. What interesting facts do they notice? Discuss how time lines help readers understand more about a topic. What did they learn from this section that was not covered in the rest of the book?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 69 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(48)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 69 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    The "ONE STAR" ratings are ridiculous! This book is

    The "ONE STAR" ratings are ridiculous! This book is very
    enjoyable for children and young teens, as well as adults. It is a
    excellent pairing for the Killing Lincoln that has been on the NYT
    Bestseller List for weeks and weeks. These "raters" are
    obviously Bill O "Haters" so DON'T, under any circumstances
    take their word for the "ONE STAR" rating...YOU WILL LOVE THIS BOOK!

    20 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2012

    I really enjoyed this book. I think a lot of teachers should use

    I really enjoyed this book. I think a lot of teachers should use this book to get students excited about reading about history. Love the authors. I like their straight forward way of telling you things about historical figures, without making them boring. I was also surprised that their own political views didn't color their writings.

    12 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2012

    Anonomus

    Love it

    12 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 21, 2012

    Don't waste your time. ¿Killing Lincoln¿ contains numerous factu

    Don't waste your time. “Killing Lincoln” contains numerous factual
    errors and no documentation or footnotes. The book mentions the Oval
    Office several times, which didn't exist during Lincoln's presidency (it
    was built in 1909 during the Taft Administration). The book says Grant
    & Lee never meet again, when in fact they did to discuss POWs. The
    book resurrects a debunked conspiracy theory that Secretary of War Edwin
    Stanton was involved in the plot to kill Lincoln so he might become
    president. In summary, this book is embarrassing.

    10 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    Great book

    Ok.... so, I am 11 and I never knew that John Wilkes Booth actually had other people in on the assasination. I also didn't know that they attacked Secretary of State Stanton in his bed to topple the American government. After I read this book, I researched on the assasination to be sure of the facts even though Mr. O'Reilly does his research. I am a kid, but I like politics. I may not aggree with some of you, but this is a wonderful history book!! :)

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    Before you buy this book for a child, read the reviews - it has

    Before you buy this book for a child, read the reviews - it has little
    connection to historic accuracy, and is poor material for young minds.

    7 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    A MUSTFOR ALL HISTORIANS

    EXCELLENT ADDENDUM TO KILLING LINCOLN

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2013

    Amazing book

    This book takes you on a amazing ride through Linolns last days until his death. Absolutely a book that any historian or lincoln fan shoul read.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    Good book!

    Really good book so far!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Cute

    The book is sad but i still like it

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2012

    A must read book if you want the details of Lincoln's murder!

    I was amazed as to how the book gave blow by blow precise details and a time line of Lincoln's last days. I also appreciated the drawings very much.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2012

    Bill O'reilly's book flows with accurate historical information.

    You can tell from the start that this will be an interesting factual easy read. There is no political agenda here. Just the story of history in the making.

    We read this book in anticipation of our trip to Wash DC and Ford theater/ Gettysburg. We knew the facts before we went, and it made it so interesting.
    I think high school students would really enjoy this read.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    A very historical read

    If you love history and want to learn more or if your school dosent teach you enough of it than this book is for you.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2012

    very worthwhilw reading. Very historical.

    Contains a lot of behind the scenes about the assination of Linclon and the happenings afterward.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2012

    Kevin

    I loved it

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    interesting book

    This book is very interesting book.I cant wait to see what happens next!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Was An excellent book and kept my attention, could hardly put it down to do other things, loved it being an e book.

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2013

    Victoria Kline

    My teacher said that this is a really good book, she was right. Wich is why I bought this book in the first place. I just know young readrs like me like this book as well as I do, so i hope they get a good education.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    is this a good book

    Is this a good book !!!!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    I loved the sample.

    I am defintly going to get this book

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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