Lincoln's Way: How Six Great Presidents Created American Power

Lincoln's Way: How Six Great Presidents Created American Power

by Richard Striner
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Lincoln's Way details the long and important historical trend that spanned six great presidencies. Striner argues that Lincoln took the young nation that the Founders created and positioned it for global power. Lincoln unleashed a potential in American life that would make the young republic a world colossus over time. Lincoln consolidated assets and borrowed

See more details below

Overview

Lincoln's Way details the long and important historical trend that spanned six great presidencies. Striner argues that Lincoln took the young nation that the Founders created and positioned it for global power. Lincoln unleashed a potential in American life that would make the young republic a world colossus over time. Lincoln consolidated assets and borrowed wisdom from the left and right. Using the vast power of our federal government, he created a political tradition that would influence the twentieth century—a tradition that spread to both parties. It is the story of an apostolic succession that moved from Lincoln to Theodore Roosevelt to Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who passed it on to Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
American history is defined in part by the tensions between liberal and conservative ideologies. Presidents have typically favored one ideology or another, causing the country to careen between different poles. Beginning with Lincoln, however, a few presidents have managed to strike a balance that resulted in incredibly productive periods of American growth, according to the author. Striner's (Father Abraham) comprehensive study of American political history is not without an agenda. The author, professor or history at Pennsylvania's Washington College, clearly believes that the path to American greatness is through a specific regulatory balance, and he supports his theory by examining the presidencies of Abraham Lincoln, T. Roosevelt, F.D. Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, and Kennedy, before examining the mistakes of Reagan, Bush, Clinton, and Bush and speculating on the presidency of Barack Obama. As persuasive a writer as Striner is, his focus on economic policy may bore as many readers as it fascinates. Yet despite his narrow thesis, readers interested in economic policy and history will be intrigued by his highly accessible study.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Choice
Drawing from Herbert Croly's The Promise of an American Life (1909), Striner argues Hamiltonian means for Jeffersonian ends employed by men who 'blended wisdom and power from conservative and liberal thought.' Beginning with Lincoln, who 'held aloft American ideals,' the reader walks a boulevard experiencing numerous detours while delighting in such moments as Eisenhower's 'middle way' serving as a reflection of Theodore Roosevelt's 'cautious progressivism.' Numerous historical asides . . . highlight the philosophical underpinnings of the founders' desire for American power exercised as guardianship. . . . Summing Up: Recommended.
CHOICE
Drawing from Herbert Croly's The Promise of an American Life (1909), Striner argues Hamiltonian means for Jeffersonian ends employed by men who 'blended wisdom and power from conservative and liberal thought.' Beginning with Lincoln, who 'held aloft American ideals,' the reader walks a boulevard experiencing numerous detours while delighting in such moments as Eisenhower's 'middle way' serving as a reflection of Theodore Roosevelt's 'cautious progressivism.' Numerous historical asides . . . highlight the philosophical underpinnings of the founders' desire for American power exercised as guardianship. . . . Summing Up: Recommended.
James M. McPherson
Richard Striner brings the remarkable range of his knowledge to this study of the ways in which six presidents from Lincoln to Kennedy expanded the powers of the federal government and of their office to promote positive, progressive change in the American polity. Drawing on a lifetime of scholarship, the author writes with great clarity for a general audience beyond the academy, while at the same time offering original insights that deepen and broaden our understanding of how the government promoted greater justice and equity in the American socioeconomic order during the century from the 1860s to the 1960s.
James MacGregor Burns
A must-read for lovers of American history—a fresh and spirited presentation of some of our greatest leaders, with special emphasis on key ideas, presented in a broad intellectual framework. An unforgettable book.
William D. Pederson
While distilling the essence of Lincoln's philosophy and showing its impact on later successful presidents, the author suggests a reasonable path for breaking the contemporary stalemate between liberals and conservatives. Sure to provoke interest and debate—it deserves the widest possible attention.
Geoffrey Wawro
This brilliant new book explores a subject that is especially poignant and urgent today: the rise (under six great presidents), and steady collapse since, of leadership and bipartisanship. . . . Lincoln's Way seamlessly weaves a very sophisticated discussion of complex financial issues as well as cultural changes into the narrative. . . . This is an invigorating, astonishingly clear exploration
The Roanoke Times
Striner injects . . . a new point of view. . . . He tells a fascinating history. . . . Striner blows away the thick smoke and breaks the mirrors to reveal a sane, middle option for people of vision to use our collective assets to build a strong nation that can provide us the essence of our unique system of governance—the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442200654
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
09/16/2010
Pages:
312
Sales rank:
1,420,836
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >