Line Up Book

Overview

"Lunch!" Sam heard his mother calling. But Sam was very busy. "Just a minute," he called back. Sam wasn't ready in a minute. Sam's mother was about to lose her patience, but when she saw what Sam had been doing, all was forgiven.

An ingenous first picture book with bold, brilliant illustrations.

Sam lines up blocks, books, boots, cars, and other objects, all the way from his room to his mother in the kitchen.

...
See more details below
Hardcover (1st ed)
$13.43
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $7.13   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

"Lunch!" Sam heard his mother calling. But Sam was very busy. "Just a minute," he called back. Sam wasn't ready in a minute. Sam's mother was about to lose her patience, but when she saw what Sam had been doing, all was forgiven.

An ingenous first picture book with bold, brilliant illustrations.

Sam lines up blocks, books, boots, cars, and other objects, all the way from his room to his mother in the kitchen.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Just when Sam has dumped his blocks on the floor, his mother calls him to lunch. Sam's not quite ready. He lines his blocks up; they stretch out from his bedroom door. His mother calls him again. ``Just a minute,'' Sam calls back. He wants the line to be longer, and sees his books. Those line up all the way to the bathroom. Bath toys, shoes and boots, trucks and carsand Sam is almost to the kitchen. His mother is almost out of patience. She starts to count to three, while Sam tries to think of a way to bridge the gap between the last truck and the kitchen door. ``He lay down on the floor with his hands over his head. Sam just reached the kitchen.'' On the count of ``Three!'' Sam's mother comes to see what has delayed him. ``It's terrific,'' she says of the line, ``But next time please come when I call you.'' Sam's dogged determination to finish his work adds an element of suspense to the story; the repeated calls of his mother will strike a familiar note, as will Sam's response, ``Just a minute!'' The paintings have a folk-art look and are full of homey touches: a checked tile floor, family photos and a simple lunch of soup and sandwiches. A focused concept, as precisely executed as Sam's final stretch to the kitchen. (3-6)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1 A charming book. When Sam's mother calls him for lunch, he answers ``Just a minute'' (a refrain with which young children will surely identify). He then uses objects in his houseblocks, books, boots, trucksto make a line from his room to the kitchen. He completes the line by lying on the floor himself just as his mother is beginning to get angry. The reassurance of her reaction and Sam's pride in his innovative route combine to create a warm, satisfied feeling that makes up for the absence of any strong conflict or drama in the story. The artwork, done in cool, refreshing pastels that are accented by warm earth tones, complements the text nicely. The lack of outlines in the shapes contributes to the overall feeling of delicacy (perfect for a book with so slight a plot). While not an essential purchase, this book will be enjoyed by preschool children in both a story hour and one-on-one setting. Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, Ill.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688062040
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/18/1986
  • Edition description: 1st ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 24
  • Sales rank: 642,965
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 130L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 9.87 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

From the time I could hold a pencil, I loved to draw. My mother was a single parent who worked full time, and my brothers were much older than I was. It seemed like I spent a lot of time alone. Drawing and, later, writing kept me company.

I was very shy. My mother was always introducing me to little girls who lived in our apartment building in Queens, New York. I became good friends with one girl named Roberta, whose mother was an artist. When they moved to a house a few blocks away, Roberta's mother set up a studio in the attic and gave art lessons. I went with them to sketch in the park. We took the subway into Manhattan to visit museums. I knew I wanted to be an artist.

In the sixth grade I read The Diary of Anne Frank and decided to keep a journal. I keep one to this day. In the seventh grade I started writing short stories. I had a wonderful English teacher, Miss Rothenberg, who encouraged me to write. My first published story appeared in the junior high school literary magazine.

While I dreamed of going to art school, my mother steered me to a liberal arts college, Mount Holyoke. Being a studio art major there was a bit outside the mainstream and, later, having a Mount Holyoke degree didn't open any doors when I began searching for work as an illustrator. But I did get a tremendous education, which serves me well every day of my life.

My early illustration jobs were for magazines, eventually for The New Yorker. I got my first book illustrating job (a cookbook) when I was pregnant with my first child. Other books followed, and two more children. It was only after my third baby was born that an illustrator friend arranged for me to meet Susan Hirschman at Greenwillow. He had to really push me to make the appointment because I was pretty much consumed with motherhood (and exhausted!) The Line Up Book was my first picture book. My son Sam was obsessed with lining up objects all over our house, and that had been my inspiration.

The stories I write usually happen that way. My children say or do something that sticks in my mind. Or I remember something from my own childhood. I mull it over and over and expand it and come up with a story. The initial idea is usually the easy part, but giving it shape, rhythm, and a climax is much more difficult. Painting the pictures is the most fun of all.

There is no other job I would want. Every day when I sit down to work in my studio--which is a bedroom in my house--I feel very lucky and very happy.

From the time I could hold a pencil, I loved to draw. My mother was a single parent who worked full time, and my brothers were much older than I was. It seemed like I spent a lot of time alone. Drawing and, later, writing kept me company.

I was very shy. My mother was always introducing me to little girls who lived in our apartment building in Queens, New York. I became good friends with one girl named Roberta, whose mother was an artist. When they moved to a house a few blocks away, Roberta's mother set up a studio in the attic and gave art lessons. I went with them to sketch in the park. We took the subway into Manhattan to visit museums. I knew I wanted to be an artist.

In the sixth grade I read The Diary of Anne Frank and decided to keep a journal. I keep one to this day. In the seventh grade I started writing short stories. I had a wonderful English teacher, Miss Rothenberg, who encouraged me to write. My first published story appeared in the junior high school literary magazine.

While I dreamed of going to art school, my mother steered me to a liberal arts college, Mount Holyoke. Being a studio art major there was a bit outside the mainstream and, later, having a Mount Holyoke degree didn't open any doors when I began searching for work as an illustrator. But I did get a tremendous education, which serves me well every day of my life.

My early illustration jobs were for magazines, eventually for The New Yorker. I got my first book illustrating job (a cookbook) when I was pregnant with my first child. Other books followed, and two more children. It was only after my third baby was born that an illustrator friend arranged for me to meet Susan Hirschman at Greenwillow. He had to really push me to make the appointment because I was pretty much consumed with motherhood (and exhausted!) The Line Up Book was my first picture book. My son Sam was obsessed with lining up objects all over our house, and that had been my inspiration.

The stories I write usually happen that way. My children say or do something that sticks in my mind. Or I remember something from my own childhood. I mull it over and over and expand it and come up with a story. The initial idea is usually the easy part, but giving it shape, rhythm, and a climax is much more difficult. Painting the pictures is the most fun of all.

There is no other job I would want. Every day when I sit down to work in my studio--which is a bedroom in my house--I feel very lucky and very happy.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)