The Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, and the Making of the Alberta-Montana Borderlands

Overview


Nations are made and unmade at their borders, and the forty-ninth parallel separating Montana and Alberta in the late nineteenth century was a pivotal Western site for both the United States and Canada. Blackfoot country was a key site of Canadian and American efforts to shape their nations and national identities. The region’s landscape, aboriginal people, newcomers, railroads, and ongoing cross-border ties all challenged the governments’ efforts to create, colonize, and nationalize the Alberta-Montana ...
See more details below
Paperback
$22.76
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$29.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $5.33   
  • New (5) from $31.64   
  • Used (7) from $5.33   
Sending request ...

Overview


Nations are made and unmade at their borders, and the forty-ninth parallel separating Montana and Alberta in the late nineteenth century was a pivotal Western site for both the United States and Canada. Blackfoot country was a key site of Canadian and American efforts to shape their nations and national identities. The region’s landscape, aboriginal people, newcomers, railroads, and ongoing cross-border ties all challenged the governments’ efforts to create, colonize, and nationalize the Alberta-Montana borderlands. The Line Which Separates makes an important and useful comparison between American and Canadian government policies and attitudes regarding race, gender, and homesteading.
 
Federal visions of the West in general and the borderlands in particular rested on overlapping sets of assumptions about space, race, and gender; those same assumptions would be used to craft the policies that were supposed to turn national visions into local realities. The growth of a white female population in the region, which should have “whitened” and “easternized” the region, merely served to complicate emerging categories. Both governments worked hard to enforce the lines that were supposed to separate "good" land from "bad," whites from aboriginals, different groups of newcomers from each other, and women's roles from men's roles. The lines and categories they depended on were used to distinguish each West, and thus each nation, from the other. Drawing on a range of sources, from government maps and reports to oral testimony and personal papers, The Line Which Separates explores the uneven way in which the borderlands were superimposed on Blackfoot country in order to divide a previously cohesive region in the late nineteenth century.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Western Historical Quarterly

The Line Which Separates is a fine history of an understudied area and a reminder in tumultuous times of the difficult physical and imaginative work that goes into nation building.”—Mary Murphy, Western Historical Quarterly

Journal of the West

"McManus adds considerably to a growing literature emphasizing the complexity of creating national boundaries. The book is insightful and the research impressive."—Journal of the West

— Ted McCoy

Journal of the West - Ted McCoy

"McManus adds considerably to a growing literature emphasizing the complexity of creating national boundaries. The book is insightful and the research impressive."—Journal of the West
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


Sheila McManus is an assistant professor of history at University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction : from Blackfoot country to borderlands
Ch. 1 Troublesome topography : mapping the West in the nineteenth century 1
Ch. 2 "Brought within reasonable distance" : managing the West, proving the border 37
Ch. 3 "Their own country" : drawing lines in Blackfoot territory 57
Ch. 4 "Bringing them more prominently into notice" : managing aboriginal peoples in the borderlands 83
Ch. 5 "A land where there is room for all" : immigration, nation building, and nonaboriginal communities in the borderlands 106
Ch. 6 "I must have been the discoverer" : white women's perceptions of life in the borderlands 142
Conclusion : just "ink on a map"? 179
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)