Lines That Wiggle

Lines That Wiggle

by Candace Whitman, Steve Wilson
     
 

Follow the line that runs through this picture book and turns itself into all kinds of things: the waves above an octopus, the veins in a leaf, the wrappings curling around a mummy, and the trapping threads of a spiderweb. Candace Whitman's catchy rhyming text is brought to life by a host of creepy critters from first-time illustrator Steve Wilson.

Overview


Follow the line that runs through this picture book and turns itself into all kinds of things: the waves above an octopus, the veins in a leaf, the wrappings curling around a mummy, and the trapping threads of a spiderweb. Candace Whitman's catchy rhyming text is brought to life by a host of creepy critters from first-time illustrator Steve Wilson.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Zany creatures—from furry monsters to more recognizable animals—celebrate different kinds of glittery lines that offer plenty of eye candy. The textural lines seem to have minds of their own as they shimmy across the pages, creating patterns and informing the simple, rhyming verse. On one spread, a mummy's bandages are unwrapped (“lines that curve/ lines that curl”), while on the following page a pink whale's blowhole makes “underwater lines that swirl.” Later, a red cat's paw loops through “lines with doggies at the end” (the accompanying image shows nine pink dachshunds on leashes). The creatures—and even a mean-looking thundercloud—brim with personality and create a sense of playful irreverence. Ages 4–8. (July)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
A raised, glittering, blue line leads enticingly from the cover across the endpages showing the many things that lines can do on all the pages inside and ending as a bowl of noodles on the back. In rhymed couplets we learn of lines that not only wiggle and bend but are wavy "from end to end." They tickle, they sprout, they trap and hide. The busy lines are visualized in single- and double-page scenes where inventive, boldly designed characters act out each of the text's definition, e.g. "lines that mend" depict a bumblebee wrapping a broken flower stem; "lines that trap" show the trap of a spider's web. Objects have a flat, stencil-like look in decorative, non-naturalistic patterns on the white backgrounds. The reinforcement of touch is added to the reading; protective sheets have been placed between pages to help keep the glitter from rubbing off but will of course be lost promptly. There is not much obvious loss, however; the "lines" stay firm. At the end, readers are urged to expand their visual awareness by finding the lines that are everywhere in the world around them. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4—Through bouncy verse and lively artwork, this creative collaboration explores the many different ways that lines are used. Readers will immediately be drawn to the glittery textured line that appears across the cover and continues throughout the book. Whitman's descriptions employ a great range of adjectives and verbs, and Wilson's graphic-style art captures the actions of the lines with a host of colorful animal and monsterlike creatures engaged in various activities. For example, "Lines that twist" (the illustration shows a school bus navigating along a serpentine road), "lines that sway" (blades of grass bend gracefully in the wind), "lines that swish the flies way" (a cowboy-boot-wearing horse dispatches insects with its tail). Lines can also "curve" and "curl" (as in a mummy's unwinding bandages), "swirl" (from a whale's spout), and "zigzag" (across a rainstorm sky). The book's design showcases specific descriptors in a cursive font that uses the textured glitter to maximum effect. This emphasis makes the connection between word and art even more striking. Children will enjoy this book on many levels. It can be read independently for pleasure or used in a variety of ways in the classroom. Art teachers in particular will find this a wonderful addition to their curriculum.—Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934706541
Publisher:
Blue Apple Books
Publication date:
03/04/2009
Pages:
36
Sales rank:
215,178
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

A native of Long Island, New York, Candace Whitman studied art history at Yale and went on to earn a master's in art education at NYU. She became interested in children's books while teaching art to kids. Candace is also pursuing a master's of divinity at Princeton Theological Seminary.

When Steve Wilson was a little kid he found real Bigfoot tracks and crop circles. It's true! Since then he has been drawing weird things like UFOs, mythological monsters, aliens, ghosts, animals, cars, superheroes, clouds, and boats. He also works in TV animation design. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >