Lines the Quarry

Lines the Quarry

by Robin Clarke
     
 

Lines the Quarry writes of and into that ongoing disaster and possibility, interjecting into the commercial language of success the many violations—bodily and otherwise—that define capitalist exploitation.See more details below

Overview

Lines the Quarry writes of and into that ongoing disaster and possibility, interjecting into the commercial language of success the many violations—bodily and otherwise—that define capitalist exploitation.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Through exploring various disasters, Clarke ends up exploring memory—“the worst disaster since the last one”—writing about people lost through the prison system, disasters man-made we don’t wish to think about, and just where the accumulation of disaster upon disaster might end up taking us. “What do you love about this / world? Without what is there nothing // else to say?”—rob mclennan, rob mclennan's blog

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781890650896
Publisher:
Omnidawn Publishing
Publication date:
10/01/2013
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.30(d)

What People are saying about this

Anne Boyer
Under the numbers of hours and the numbers of dollars is another, more calculating math: this one of bodies. The collapse in this book is under the weight of false documents. One disaster becomes another, and then another— the disaster of capital, the disaster of families, the disaster of language, the disaster of earth. In a melancholy weaving of a thousand brutal and specific facts, there remains hope for the “still human” – what resistance girls and women, who insist against circumstances, can find in “lighters & wordiness.” Lines the Quarry is a keenly needed reminder of what, in the common disaster, wants to live (“everything”).
Mark Nowak
One of the most compelling first books I’ve read in years. If there is a literary equivalent to the financial cliff, Robin Clarke’s Lines the Quarry represents the mountain of wreckage at the bottom of the free fall. Workers Comp injury data, fractured syntax, Robocops, and “stories/of girl children young enough to marry their fathers, old/enough to shoulder the pretend” all mash up into a stunning series of poems. This book is where OSHA meets arsenic, and where the courage to take a political position amidst the sampling of texts is the very beginning of “making it new” all over again.

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