Linking Species & Ecosystems / Edition 1

Linking Species & Ecosystems / Edition 1

4.0 1
by Clive Jones, John H. Lawton
     
 

ISBN-10: 0412048019

ISBN-13: 9780412048012

Pub. Date: 11/30/1994

Publisher: Springer US

This is the first volume devoted to the integration of population and ecosystem ecology—an approach that offers vast potential for improving our understanding of the complexities of nature and the management of environmental problems. The editors, Clive Jones and John Lawton, work at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York and the Natural Environment

Overview

This is the first volume devoted to the integration of population and ecosystem ecology—an approach that offers vast potential for improving our understanding of the complexities of nature and the management of environmental problems. The editors, Clive Jones and John Lawton, work at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York and the Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Population Biology in England, respectively. They have brought together a distinguished group of experts to explore diverse aspects of linking species and ecosystem perspectives: theoretical, empirical and pragmatic including: *processes that range from a local to a planetary scale *the role of organisms as ecosystem engineers *the use of ecological flow chains to link population and ecosystem processes *numerous examples of the influence of species on ecosystem processes and vice versa *a unique blend of problems and processes drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems *problems of species redundancy in ecosystem processes *stoichiometric constraints on species interactions; *scaling and aggregation problems. The book establishes conceptual frameworks for the rigorous study of interactions between species and ecosystems, it points to still-unanswered questions, and it identifies future research directions. Integration of ecology with its implications for teaching, research and society are central to the book. This pioneering volume will be an indispensable resource for ecology researchers, students, and environmental managers and will stimulate debate on the future integration of the field.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780412048012
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
11/30/1994
Edition description:
1995
Pages:
387
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Issues: Why link species and ecosystems?: a perspective from ecosystem ecology— Nancy B. Grimm; Organisms and species as complex adaptive systems: linking the biology of populations with the physics of ecosystems— James H. Brown; Scope: Bioturbators as ecosystem engineers: control of the sediment fabric, inter-individual interactions, and material fluxes— Jeffrey Levinton; Biogeochemical processes and marine benthic community structure: which follows which?— Anne E. Giblin, Kenneth H. Foreman and Gary T. Banta; Marine snow: what it is and how it affects ecosystem functioning— M. W. Silver, S. L. Coale, D. K. Steinberg and C. H. Pilskahn; Floods, food chains, and ecosystem processes in rivers— Mary E. Power; Population variability in experimental ecosystems— Michael L. Pace; Stephen R. Carpenter, and Patricia A. Soranno; How important are consumer species to ecosystem functioning?— Nancy Huntly; Linking tree population dynamics and forest ecosystem processes— Charles D. Canham and Stephen W. Pacala; Soil organisms as engineers: microsite modulation of macroscale processes— J. M. Anderson; Soil fauna: linking different levels of the ecological hierarchy— Robert W. Parmelee; Beaver as engineers: influences on biotic and abiotic characteristics of drainage basins— Michael M. Pollock, Robert J. Naiman, Heather E. Erickson, Carol A. Johnston, John Pastor and Gilles Pinay; Atmospheric oxygen and the biosphere— Heinrich D. Holland; Approaches: Linking species and ecosystems: organisms as ecosystem engineers— John H. Lawton and Clive G. Jones; Top-level carnivores and ecosystem effects: questions and approaches— James A. Estes; Food webs in soil: an interface between population and ecosystem ecology— Jan Bengtsson, David Wei Zheng, Goran I. Agren and Tryggve Persson; Unifying ecological subdisciplines with ecosystem food webs— Neo D. Martinez; Coupling the dynamics of species and materials— William S. C. Gurney, Alex H. Ross and Niall Broekhuizen; Exploring aggregation in space and time— Monica G. Turner and Robert V. O'Neill; Aggregation of species properties for biogeochemical modeling: empirical results— David S. Schimel, V. B. Brown, K. A. Hibbard, C. P. Lund and S. Archer; Functional redundancy and process aggregation: linking ecosystems to species— Edward B. Rastetter and Gaius R. Shaver; Species compensation and complementarity in ecosystem function— Thomas M. Frost, Stephen R. Carpenter, Anthony R. Ives and Timothy K. Kratz; Elemental stoichiometry of species in ecosystems— Robert W. Sterner; Species, nitrogen and grassland dynamics: the constraints of stuff— David A. Wedin; Relationships between the energetics of species and large scale species richness— Donald L. DeAngelis; Linking species and ecosystems: where's Darwin?— Robert D. Holt; Ecological flow chains and ecological systems: concepts for linking species and ecosystem perspectives— Moshe Shachak and Clive G. Jones; Context: The relevance of ecology: the societal context and disciplinary implications of linkages across levels of ecological organization— Jane Lubchenco; Linking species and ecosystems through training of students— Lawrence B. Slobodkin; Linking species and communities to ecosystem management: a perspective from the experimental lakes experience— D. W. Schindler; Why link species conservation, environmental protection, and resource management?— Jerry F. Franklin; References; Index.

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Linking Species & Ecosystems 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
AnnieBM More than 1 year ago
Typically ecology deals with physical/chemical or abiotic concerns and their effects on populations and communities or with biotic concerns in terms of populations or communities. There has only rarely been any real thought about species as an evolutionary entity or the linking of species with ecosystem processing. In this book, the many authors address these linkages from a variety of different studies. Particular concern is given to organisms as ecosystem engineers, to modeling, to the importance of scale and changes on parameters as scale changes, and evolutionary history. Students of ecology will find this book particularly helpful especially for bringing together different levels of ecological study and with evolutionary considerations of species.