Linq in Action
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Linq in Action

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by Fabrice Marguerie, Steve Eichert, Jim Wooley
     
 

LLINQ, Language INtegrated Query, is a new extension to the Visual Basic and C# programming languages designed to simplify data queries and database interaction. It addreses O/R mapping issues by making query operations like SQL statements part of the programming language. It also offers built-in support for querying in-memory collections like arrays or lists, XML,

Overview

LLINQ, Language INtegrated Query, is a new extension to the Visual Basic and C# programming languages designed to simplify data queries and database interaction. It addreses O/R mapping issues by making query operations like SQL statements part of the programming language. It also offers built-in support for querying in-memory collections like arrays or lists, XML, DataSets, and relational databases.

LINQ in Action is a fast-paced, comprehensive tutorial for professional developers. This book explores what can be done with LINQ, shows how it works in an application, and addresses the emerging best practices. It presents the general purpose query facilities offered by LINQ in the upcoming C# 3.0 and VB.NET 9.0 languages. A running example introduces basic LINQ concepts. You'll then learn to query unstructured data using LINQ to XML and relational data with LINQ to SQL. Finally, you'll see how to extend LINQ for custom applications.

LINQ in Action will guide you along as you explore this new world of lambda expressions, query operators, and expression trees. As well, you'll explore the new features of C# 3.0, VB.NET 9.0. The book is very practical, anchoring each new idea with running code. Whether you want to use LINQ to query objects, XML documents, or relational databases, you will find all the information you need to get started

But LINQ in Action does not stop at the basic code. This book also shows you how LINQ can be used for advanced processing of data, including coverage of LINQ's extensibility, which allows querying more data sources than those supported by default. All code samples are built on a concrete business case. The running example, LinqBooks, is a personal book cataloging system that shows you how to create LINQ applications with Visual Studio 2008.

Purchase of the print book comes with an offer of a free PDF, ePub, and Kindle eBook from Manning. Also available is all code from the book.

Editorial Reviews

For programmers, dealing with data is just too complicated. First, there's the mismatch between object languages and relational databases. Then, there are all those sources of data to contend with: from XML documents to file systems to in-memory objects. Say you're working with .NET. Knowing VB or C# isn't enough: You need to deal with SQL, XML, XPath, ADO.NET, System.XML, and whatever else. LINQ eliminates this complexity. That's why .NET developers are so excited about it -- and it's why you'll be so excited about LINQ in Action.

This book teaches LINQ from soup to nuts: what it is, and how to use it to simplify and unify all forms of data access. The authors illuminate LINQ's consistent syntax, programming model, and "language-integrated query" concept, and teach techniques that'll work whether your data's stored in an RDBMS or an array.

The authors treat each LINQ "provider" in detail: LINQ to Objects, LINQ to SQL, LINQ to XML, LINQ to DataSet, and LINQ to Entities (which works with the ADO.NET Entity Framework). You'll find plenty of brief, concise code linked to specific tasks -- but you'll also find more sophisticated code designed to solve problems that would otherwise trip you up in the real world.

For example, LINQ now supports queries to generic collections. But what if your .NET code doesn't yet use generics? The authors walk you through a solution. For example, again: Often, you won't want to present data directly to the user -- you'll want to filter, sort, and format it first. LINQ handles that easily, but there are gotchas (What if the user doesn't provide values for all query criteria?). Again, this book offers solutions. You can tell these authors are really doing production work with LINQ -- and if you intend to, that's the kind of help you want. Bill Camarda, from the February 2008 Read Only

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933988160
Publisher:
Manning Publications Company
Publication date:
02/28/2008
Pages:
576
Product dimensions:
7.42(w) x 9.18(h) x 1.13(d)

Meet the Author

Fabrice Marguerie is a software architect and developer based in Paris, France. Fabrice is a C# MVP has been working with LINQ from the first prototypes.

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is the fruit of a collaborative work. In a time of globalization, where ideas know no frontiers, this is a refreshing take on a hot topic like LINQ. We have here three well known experts in their fields (name of the authors here) coming together to produce an excellent text book on LINQ. The introduction is an appetizer for what comes next. LINQ is not a language you will fall in love with at first sight. It demands that you get to know it but when you do you're hooked. In this book we get a good summary outlining why we can't live without LINQ anymore. Also, a nice touch from the authors is that the code is written in both C# and VB.NET. It's a pity that this is not continued throughout the book. However, according to the writers, all the samples used in the book are available for download in both languages. So guys you are forgiven! Because LINQ introduces new features, a full chapter is dedicated to C# 3.0 and VB.NET 9.0 enhancements. This chapter is for me the weakest part of the book. Even if LINQ in action is not intended for beginners, I would suggest to the readers to skip this section and come back to it later, because it will give intermediate developers the idea that LINK is only comprehendible by experts. It is too complicated too early in the book. The rest of the book is cleverly divided into roughly three parts: LINQ for objects, LINQ for XML and LINQ for SQL. It is a very good idea indeed to have pushed the SQL part further down, after all, LINQ is much more than a mere language for relational databases. It is an advanced technology with many capabilities. For example, Object paradigm is at the heart of LINQ and this is well demonstrated throughout the book. To conclude I would warmly recommend this book but for intermediate developers not for real beginners because some of the explanations introduced by the authors are not for the faint hearted! I also give credit to the authors for creating from a blank canvas something as colorful as this book about LINQ. A hard challenge when you consider that nobody has really fully embraced the concept in a commercial application to date. It's also a first book for Fabrice Marguerie, who I know well by his blog. Fabrice is a strong minded person, an expert in Object Relational Mapping, which gives you even more reason to purchase this book.