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Linus the Vegetarian T. rex
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Linus the Vegetarian T. rex

5.0 1
by Robert Neubecker
 

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Meet Linus—a Tyrannosaurus rex who is very brave, very tough, and very…vegetarian?

Ruth Ann Mackenzie knows everything about dinosaurs. She knows their names. She knows when they lived. And she certainly knows what they ate. So when she meets Linus, a towering, toothy T. rex who prefers picking vegetables to preying on his

Overview

Meet Linus—a Tyrannosaurus rex who is very brave, very tough, and very…vegetarian?

Ruth Ann Mackenzie knows everything about dinosaurs. She knows their names. She knows when they lived. And she certainly knows what they ate. So when she meets Linus, a towering, toothy T. rex who prefers picking vegetables to preying on his herbivorous neighbors, she’s not sure what to think. Is something wrong with Linus? Or does Ruth Ann maybe, just maybe, not know everything there is to know about dinosaurs?

Dino lovers young and old will delight in this picture book chock-full of prehistoric personality—and don’t forget to search for the naughty velociraptor duo hidden throughout the book!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Neubecker’s vegetarian hero lives in the “Cretaceous Surprises” exhibit at the museum, which indeed holds surprises for a junior dinosaur expert named Ruth Ann MacKenzie. “First Linus attacked... a patch of arugula!” writes Neubecker (Time Out for Monsters!), in the first of several setups that seem to start out as examples of how prehistoric nature is red in tooth and claw, but actually illustrate what a sweetie Linus is (“It’s lovely to see you, Linus,” says Ellen, a mother triceratops that Ruth Ann was certain would become Linus’s dinner). Did Linus not get the memo? This tale of a dinosaur who munches to a different drummer radiates Neubecker’s customary energy and compositional inventiveness, but it isn’t quite up to his best work—the jokes about Linus being a softie are little too soft, Ruth Ann and Linus are genial but not particularly original personalities, and the ending runs out of steam. Still, the Neubecker touch is hard to resist, and the visual tastiness of these pages compensates for the slight story. Ages 3–7. Agent: Linda Pratt, Wernick & Pratt. (July)
Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Ruth Ann knows everything there is to know about dinosaurs so when she meets Linus the affable blue T. Rex in a special display at the Museum of Natural History she is shocked to learn he is not a meat-eater. Arugula, broccoli, and tomatoes are more his style and he is friends with triceratopses and iguanodons. He would not think of eating them no matter how much Ruth Ann explains to him that he is a predator. But when two velociraptors attack, Linus roars his fiercest roar and saves Ruth Ann, proving he is big and brave, and just happens to be a vegetarian. Just what is the point of this story other than to confuse children? Purists will disavow a vegetarian T. Rex and the vegetables he eats were not part of the Cretaceous Period. Perhaps it was written to enlighten and to debunk the notion that vegetarians cannot be brave. The weakness of the tale is its lack of direction, but a strength is the full-page colorful illustrations that bring energy and whimsy to the obscure theme. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
Kirkus Reviews
This dino with a penchant for greenery means well, but his tale is clearly hampered by its confusing message. If you want to know anything about dinosaurs, then the kid to talk to is Ruth Ann MacKenzie. A whiz at everything related to residents of the Cretaceous, she visits a mysterious new museum exhibit that plants her firmly in the past and within the protective sphere of Linus, a polite, blue T-Rex who wouldn't dream of eating meat. After watching him munch on plants and pal about with every creature he meets, Ruth Ann decides to set the sweet guy straight. Fortunately, her misguided attempts are interrupted by two hungry velociraptors who are put in their place by a clearly ferocious Linus. Conclusion? "I'm just me--a very big, very brave, very VEGETARIAN Tyrannosaurus rex!" Children may have a hard time determining what lesson they are to take from this. Are they meant to learn that vegetarianism doesn't make you a wimp? Or that it will win them hordes of adoring friends and fans? Or just not to make assumptions? (Kids like Ruth Ann will note Linus' many pointy teeth and wonder how he's going to negotiate that carrot….) Where the story falters, the art leaps and soars. From the many-colored eyes of the iguanodons to the velociraptors hidden on almost every page, the book is a visual treat. Though they may have fun with it, readers' attempts to sink their teeth into this story will find them gummed up with uncertain conclusions. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416985129
Publisher:
Beach Lane Books
Publication date:
07/09/2013
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
297,200
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD390L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Robert Neubecker is the author and illustrator of Linus the Vegetarian T. Rex and of his own Wow! series. He is also the award-winning illustrator of Shiver Me Timbers by Douglas Florian, Sophie Peterman Tells the Truth by Sarah Weeks, I Got Two Dogs by John Lithgow, and Monsters on Machines by Deb Lund. A graduate of Parsons School of Design, Robert also illustrates for the New York Times and Slate magazine. After twenty years in Manhattan, he and his family live in Park City, Utah. Visit Robert at Neubecker.com.

Robert Neubecker is the author and illustrator of Linus the Vegetarian T. Rex and of his own Wow! series. He is also the award-winning illustrator of Shiver Me Timbers by Douglas Florian, Sophie Peterman Tells the Truth by Sarah Weeks, I Got Two Dogs by John Lithgow, and Monsters on Machines by Deb Lund. A graduate of Parsons School of Design, Robert also illustrates for the New York Times and Slate magazine. After twenty years in Manhattan, he and his family live in Park City, Utah. Visit Robert at Neubecker.com.

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Linus the Vegetarian T. rex 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
RainAngel757 More than 1 year ago
My three year old loves this book. The pictures are fun and the wording isn't downplayed for children. We had maxed out the renewals at the library so we finally broke down and ordered it for him. Definitely a must for any dinosaur obsessed kid!