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Linux in the WorkPlace: How to use Linux in Your Office
     

Linux in the WorkPlace: How to use Linux in Your Office

by Publisher of Linux Journal SSC, Linux Journal, Ssc Publisher of Linux Journal, Linux Journal (Created by)
 

Linux in the Workplace introduces Linux users to the desktop capabilities of Linux and the K Desktop Environment (KDE) graphical user interface, a powerful Open Source graphical desktop environment for UNIX workstations. Includes information on how to use email and surf the Internet; perform general office-related tasks; work with the command line; and much

Overview

Linux in the Workplace introduces Linux users to the desktop capabilities of Linux and the K Desktop Environment (KDE) graphical user interface, a powerful Open Source graphical desktop environment for UNIX workstations. Includes information on how to use email and surf the Internet; perform general office-related tasks; work with the command line; and much more.

Editorial Reviews

Linux offers the potential to save several hundred dollars in software costs per desktop -- if only you could cut down on the user training costs. This book might just be your solution.

Business Linux users need radically different information than most Linux books dish out. Enter Linux in the Workplace: the most non-technical Linux book we’ve seen. It’s thoroughly focused on end-users, not administrators (so you’ll learn how to use printers and Web connections, not how to manage a Linux-based network). Best of all, its author team works at a company that’s already made the transition to Linux on the desktop -- so they understand what it’s like.

The authors focus on several key productivity tools that run under (or with) the KDE desktop. You’ll find a practical introduction to the OpenOffice/StarOffice suite, likely to be your workhorse Linux productivity software. There’s also complete coverage of the Konqueror web browser, including “meat-and-potatoes” browsing, bookmarks, saving and printing web pages, and customization.

You’ll also find solid coverage of both KOrganizer and Kmail, which together can substitute for much of Outlook. (We might’ve liked coverage of the powerful Ximian Evolution personal information manager, but we can see how adding this GNOME application to a KDE-oriented book might have caused confusion.)

Once your people are swimming nicely in the Linux environment, you might consider supplementing this book with deeper information (for example, the same publisher’s The Book of OpenOffice). But this is the book that’ll help you make it through the transition. (Bill Camarda)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781886411869
Publisher:
No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
Publication date:
11/01/1902
Pages:
360
Product dimensions:
7.41(w) x 9.24(h) x 0.89(d)

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