Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson

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Overview

"Samson the hero; a brave warrior, leader of men and Nazarite of God? Or a misfit given to whoring and lust, who failed to fulfill his destiny? In Lion's Honey, David Grossman takes on one of the most vivid and controversial characters in the Bible. Revisiting Samson's famous battle with the lion, his many women and his betrayal by them all - including the only one he ever loved - Grossman gives us a provocative new take on the story and its climax, Samson's final act of death, bringing down a temple on himself and three thousand Philistines."
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Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson

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Overview

"Samson the hero; a brave warrior, leader of men and Nazarite of God? Or a misfit given to whoring and lust, who failed to fulfill his destiny? In Lion's Honey, David Grossman takes on one of the most vivid and controversial characters in the Bible. Revisiting Samson's famous battle with the lion, his many women and his betrayal by them all - including the only one he ever loved - Grossman gives us a provocative new take on the story and its climax, Samson's final act of death, bringing down a temple on himself and three thousand Philistines." Grossman reveals the journey of a single, lonely and tortured soul who never found a true home in the world, who was uncomfortable in his very body and who, some might say, was the precursor of today's suicide bombers.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Samson, the biblical strongman whose strength lay in his long hair, has long been viewed as a hero. Before his birth, an angel told his mother that her child would be consecrated to God and save his people. But his is a strange and tragic story. Only in defeat, after his duplicitous lover Delilah cuts off his tresses and hands him over to his enemies, can he fulfill the prophecy and bring down the Philistine temple, killing himself and his captors. Acclaimed Israeli novelist Grossman (The Body) revisits the story in Canongate's series the Myths. He views Samson as an impulsive, lonely, failed man. Grossman's consideration falls squarely into the Jewish tradition of biblical exegesis, imparting both psychological and literary meaning to the story. His mastery of the Hebrew allows for depths of consideration not available to anyone working with a translation. But his reading of Samson is oddly contradictory: on the one hand, he insists that Samson is a man controlled by outside forces; on the other, that deep psychological needs drive him to self-destructive behavior. In the end, Grossman refuses to entertain the most glaring possibility the myth opens up: that only in his failure can Samson succeed and fulfill his life's mission. (Apr. 18) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
“Samson, in Grossman’s telling, has the eye of an artist and the tongue of a poet.”
The Globe and Mail

“Grossman’s genius is his ability to make Samson completely plausible, and to make us accept that his conjectures in Lion’s Honey are real facts. With his profound knowledge of Israel, Grossman has illuminated Samson in Biblical times as well as our own and made the myth a tragic reality.”
Sunday Herald (Glasgow)

“In Lion’s Honey, David Grossman reaches beyond the calamitous events to conduct a sensitive examination of human motivation. . . . [And] the author does so in a most elegant style.”
The Times Literary Supplement (TLS)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781841957715
  • Publisher: Canongate Books
  • Publication date: 1/1/2006
  • Series: Myths Series
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.24 (w) x 7.83 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Meet the Author

David Grossman is a leading Israeli writer whose work has been translated into 25 languages. He is the author of six internationally acclaimed novels and a number of children’s books. Grossman has been presented with numerous awards including the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Artes et des Lettres (France). He lives with his wife and children in a suburb of Jerusalem.
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Read an Excerpt

Foreword

‘Samson the hero’ is what every Jewish child, the first time he or she hears the story, learns to call him. And that, more or less, is how he has been represented over the years, in hundreds of works of art, theatre and film, in the literatures of many languages: a mythic hero and fierce warrior, the man who tore apart a lion with his bare hands, the charismatic leader of the Jews in their wars against the Philistines, and, without a doubt, one of the most tempestuous and colourful characters in the Hebrew Bible.

But the way that I read the story in the pages of my bible — the Book of Judges, chapters 13 to 16 — runs against the grain of the familiar Samson. Mine is not the brave leader (who never, after all, actually led his people), nor the Nazirite of God (who, we must admit, was given to whoring and lust), nor just a muscle-bound murderer. For me, this is most of all the story of a man whose life was a never-ending struggle to accommodate himself to the powerful destiny imposed upon him, a destiny he was never able to realise nor, apparently, fully to understand. It is the story of a child who was born a stranger to his father and mother; the story of a magnificent strongman who ceaselessly yearned to win his parents’ love — and, therefore, love in general — which in the end he never received.

There are few other Bible stories with so much drama and action, narrative fireworks and raw emotion, as we find in the tale of Samson: the battle with the lion; the three hundred burning foxes; the women he bedded and the one woman that he loved; his betrayal by all the women in his life, from his mother to Delilah; and, in the end, his murderous suicide, when he brought the house down on himself and three thousand Philistines. Yet beyond the wild impulsiveness, the chaos, the din, we can make out a life story that is, at bottom, the tortured journey of a single, lonely and turbulent soul who never found, anywhere, a true home in the world, whose very body was a harsh place of exile. For me, this discovery, this recognition, is the point at which the myth — for all its grand images, its larger-than-life adventures — slips silently into the day-to-day existence of each of us, into our most private moments, our buried secrets.

There is a point in the Samson story — the moment when he falls asleep on Delilah’s lap — that seems to absorb and encapsulate the entire tale. Samson withdraws into his childish, almost infantile self, disarmed of the violence, madness, and passion that have confounded and ruined his life. This is, of course, also the moment when his fate is sealed, for Delilah is clutching his hair and the razor, and the Philistines outside are already relishing their victory. In another moment his eyes will be plucked out and his power extinguished. Soon he will be thrown into prison and his days will be ended. Yet it is now, perhaps for the first time in his life, that he finds repose. Here, in the very heart of the cruel perfidy that he has surely expected all along, he is finally granted perfect peace, a release from himself and the stormy drama of his life.

*
• *

In those days, apparently the end of the twelfth and beginning of the eleventh centuries bce, there was not yet a king in Israel, nor any central authority. The neighbouring nations of Midian, Canaan, Moab, Amon, and Philistia took advantage of the weak Hebrew tribes and launched campaigns of conquest and pillage against them. Every so often there would arise, in one tribe or another, a person who would know how to lead his tribe, sometimes several joined together, into retaliatory battle. If he won, he would become the leader and judge, and be called shofet. Such were Gideon and Jephthah, Ehud the son of Gerah, Shamgar the son of Anat, and Deborah, the wife of Lapidot. Thus the Israelites swung cyclically between periods of oppression and redemption that corresponded, as recounted in the Book of Judges, to their sins and their atonement. First they would worship idols, then God would muster the murderous neighbours as punishment. They would cry out to Him in their affliction, and He would elect from among them a person who would save them.

In the midst of this turbulence lived a man and woman of the tribe of Dan. They lived in Zorah in the Judean lowlands, an especially violent region, as in those days it was the boundary between Israel and the Philistines. For the Israelites, it was the first line of defence against the Philistines; for the Philistines, it was the essential first step in any attempt to conquer the Judean hill country. The man was called Manoah, but the woman’s name is not known. It is said of her only that she was ‘barren and had borne no children’, which is enough to suggest that, along with the hardships of the frontier, their marriage had also been filled with pain.

But anyone familiar with the semiotics of biblical storytelling also knows that the very mention of a barren woman almost always foreshadows a momentous birth. And indeed, one day — during one of those periods when ‘the Israelites again did what was offensive to the Lord’ — when the woman is alone, without her husband, an angel of God appears before her and tells her: ‘You are barren and have borne no children; but you shall conceive and bear a son.’ And immediately he gives her a list of instructions and warnings, and also good news: ‘Now be careful not to drink wine or other intoxicant, or to eat anything unclean; for you are going to conceive and bear a son; let no razor touch his head, for the boy is to be a Nazirite to God from the womb on. It is he who shall begin to deliver Israel from the Philistines.’

She goes to her husband and says, ‘A man of God came to me.’ And the reader’s ears prick up, because the woman does not use the same word as that of the biblical narrator — ‘an angel of God appeared to the woman’ — but rather ‘came to me’, a charged phrase rich with double meaning, which more than once in the Bible refers to the act of copulation itself.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    OMG

    Gfhduehd

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    HIGHLY LISTENABLE NARRATION

    According to the Bible, Samson was called by the Lord. In the eyes of Hollywood it was a prime role for Victor Mature. Most will use Samson as a synonym for strong man. Yet little is truly known about the man. Acclaimed writer David Grossman has an advantage over many would be biographers in that he can read the story of Samson in Hebrew, and for this author the man who brought down the Temple killing not only himself but some 3,000 Philistines was quixotic, troubled, and alone. As the author describes his hero's psychological characteristics, he ably draws a parallel between Samson and man today by saying, ''Yet, beyond the wild impulsiveness, the chaos, the din, we can make out a life story that is, at bottom, the tortured journey of a single, lonely and turbulent soul who never found, anywhere, a true home in the world, whose very body was a harsh place of exile. For me, this discovery, this recognition, is the point at which the myth ¿ for all its grand images, its larger-than-life adventures ¿ slips silently into the day-to-day existence of each of us, into our most private moments, our buried secrets.' Even the most recalcitrant Sunday School student probably remembers the story of Samson as it is packed with excitement, drama, and adventure. According to the text, an angel appeared to Samson's mother before he was born saying that he would be the one to save his people. We remember that the secret of his uncommon strength lay in his long hair, which was cut by Delilah who then gave him to his enemies. It was a tortuous journey to fulfill that early prophecy. Writer, director, voice performer Mel Foster offers a highly listenable narration of the story of one of the most fascinating yet enigmatic biblical figures. - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2009

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