Lions of the West: Heroes and Villains of the Westward Expansion

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Overview


From Thomas Jefferson’s birth in 1743 to the California Gold Rush in 1849, America’s westward expansion comes to life in the hands of a writer fascinated by the way individual lives link up, illuminate one another, and collectively impact history.

Jefferson, a naturalist and visionary, dreamed that the United States would stretch across the North American continent, from ocean to ocean. The account of how that dream became reality unfolds in ...
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Lions of the West: Heroes and Villains of the Westward Expansion

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Overview


From Thomas Jefferson’s birth in 1743 to the California Gold Rush in 1849, America’s westward expansion comes to life in the hands of a writer fascinated by the way individual lives link up, illuminate one another, and collectively impact history.

Jefferson, a naturalist and visionary, dreamed that the United States would stretch across the North American continent, from ocean to ocean. The account of how that dream became reality unfolds in the stories of Jefferson and nine other Americans whose adventurous spirits and lust for land pushed the westward boundaries: Andrew Jackson, John “Johnny Appleseed” Chapman, David Crockett, Sam Houston, James K. Polk, Winfield Scott, Kit Carson, Nicholas Trist, and John Quincy Adams.

Their stories—and those of the nameless thousands who risked their lives to settle on the frontier, displacing thou- sands of Native Americans—form an extraordinary chapter in American history that led directly to the cataclysm of the Civil War. Filled with illustrations, portraits, maps, battle plans, notes, and time lines, Lions of the West is a richly authoritative biography of America—its ideals, its promise, its romance, and its destiny.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Robert Morgan’s latest work is a tour de force of historical concision, combining prodigious research and adroit synthesis. The biographer of Daniel Boone and prize-winning novelist and poet sets his sights on creating “a living sense of the westward expansion." –The Boston Globe

“In his fascinating, magnificent Lions of the West, Morgan ... writes with an enviable clarity that makes personalities, issues and events come alive on the page... This authoritative and enlightening book engages the reader from the first page and holds our attention until the last.” –BookPage

“Morgan's accounts of these key players make for an intriguing journey westward... Morgan has given us a stimulating and engaging account of how it all came about.” –Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Morgan begins his work with Jefferson — a lover of nature, patron of explorers and dreamer of expansion. Several pages are dedicated to Jefferson’s work, Notes on the State of Virginia. “His book is, among other things, a celebration and homage to his birth country," Morgan writes. Though he lacks Jefferson’s poetry, the same might be said about Morgan’s latest work.” –Newark Star-Ledger

“Highly entertaining... A highly readable, often enjoyable, perspective on some of the biggest American luminaries participating, either actively or philosophically, in the settlement of the American West.” –Roanoke Times

Lions of the West is a compelling and insightful history that reads like the talk of a learned companion...Morgan entertains with adventures and details, both high-minded and handy. His largest achievement is something of special note here. In his fiction, poetry, and history, Morgan represents a Scots-Irish/British tradition, and fuses, for all of America, romantic and pragmatic traditions.” –Asheville Citizen-Times

“Fans of David McCullough's big best sellers should eat this one up... Morgan knows that the root of history is story, and he has plenty to tell. He gives us wonderful moments: Sam Houston, in Cherokee costume, encountering Alexis de Tocqueville on a steamboat, or Abigail Adams meeting Alexander McGillivray, the half-caste, Charleston-educated chieftain of the Upper Creeks and judging him ‘much of a Gentleman.’ No novel can do better.” –Wilmington Star News

“Robert Morgan should be declared a national treasure, and his latest work, Lions of the West, is bound to become a classic in the study of American westward expansion.” –Charlotte News & Observer

“[Morgan’s] detailed storytelling is rather poetically fascinating. He reminds us that all figures in history were more than what they accomplished -- that many led the lives of everyday men...I now see the men behind the America I've always known.” –Iowa City Press-Citizen

“This valuable addition to the historical record is by a gifted historian and novelist. It fills the gap in a most interesting period of American history. It is a ‘can’t-put-it-down’ kind of history book.”
–Southern Pines Pilot

“History as it should be told: through colorful biographical sketches, Morgan presents the unvarnished story of the annexation and settling of the American West.” –Shelf Awareness

“Morgan has made the Old West his preserve…[his] sympathetic and thoughtful essay on Kit Carson ruminates on the moral challenges raised by westward expansion. Readers interested in the Old West will be rewarded.” –Publishers Weekly

“Morgan has done a good job of cherry-picking the best and the brightest of the bunch… a digestible introduction to American expansion, Manifest Destiny, and the larger-than-life men who led the inexorable charge westward.” –Booklist

“A vivid, well-conceived look at western expansion in the old narrative-driven school of Bernard DeVoto and Wallace Stegner.” –Kirkus Reviews

“A tour de force of historical concision, combining prodigious research and adroit synthesis.”
The Boston Globe

“Sometimes, superb research can yield memorable chronicling of lives in an economical manner, rather than in a detailed cradle to grave account. That is the case in Morgan’s compulsively readable group history.”
The Seattle Times

“Morgan’s marriage of history and well-wrought prose is as engrossing as it is edifying.”
The Louisville Courier-Journal

“Morgan’s accounts of these key players make for an intriguing journey westward . . . A stimulating and engaging account.”
Minneapolis Star Tribune

Lions of the West is history at its best.”
The Charleston Post and Courier

Lions of the West is history at its best.”
The Charleston Post and Courier

Southern Literary Review
“Nobody writes history like Morgan. His books teach and inspire. He gives the past, with all its heroes and villains, a new life, if not a new purpose.”
Southern Literary Review
Charlotte Observer
“Robert Morgan should be declared a national treasure, and his latest work, Lions of the West, is bound to become a classic in the study of American westward expansion.”
Charlotte Observe
Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Nobody writes history like Morgan. His books teach and inspire. He gives the past, with all its heroes and villains, a new life, if not a new purpose.”
Southern Literary Review
The Barnes & Noble Review

After a century of popular and learned enlightenment — Charles Beard and Howard Zinn; civil rights and decolonization; Africana Studies, Chicano Studies, gender studies, genocide studies; the American Indian Movement and the endangered species list — we're supposed to know better.

Yet it's still rather impossible to look at a map of the North American continent and not see a destiny logical and inevitable — indeed, manifest. Once the strip of British colonies on the Atlantic coast wrested a divorce from the mother country, where else could history have gone but west, till it hit another ocean? Like the nursery-catalog saplings assigned to numbered growing zones, Americans — or estadounidenses, to borrow a sorely lacking word from the hemispheric neighbors — seem bred for germination along a sharply bounded clime. In 1783, the new United States' northernmost point, along the border of what was then the Massachusetts exclave of Maine, lay less than a degree south of the 49° N boundary that would eventually stretch from Minnesota to the Pacific. What became the southern extreme of Arizona and New Mexico is just about a parallel (or sixty-nine miles) north of Georgia's. Even the exceptional departures from colonial latitudes — namely, Florida and Texas, those subtropical graftings to the mainland and semi-alien nation-states in their own right - - seem to prove the rule: The American future has always been due west.

Except, of course, when it wasn't. In Lions of the West — Robert Morgan's diverting, if slight, collection of historical profiles — the big cat that casts the longest shadow (in a litter of nine) is probably Andrew Jackson. But, as we learn, that brilliant statesman, strategist, and sociopath of Indian removal only rose to prominence by successfully fighting the Creeks in a sideshow to the War of 1812, whose main offensive thrusts were three comically inept invasions of Canada. Indeed, for its early leaders, freeing the rest of North America from King George's heirs — not to mention getting at the Loyalists that slipped across the St. Lawrence — seems to have been at least as obvious a part of the nation's destiny as settling the scrubland west of the Mississippi. (Perhaps the dream lives on. Declassified in 1974, the Army's 1930s-era "War Plan Red" began with a poison-gas strike on Halifax and was detailed enough to specify the best highway to take in the siege of Vancouver.)

So if not really Founding Father wisdom or constitutional clairvoyance, why west? According to Morgan — whose Appalachia-set poetry and historical novels are romantic nationalism of the oldest school — the high policy and politics of Manifest Destiny always trailed individual fates: "Historians may concentrate on the famous, but most of what happens is the composite deeds of common folk. There is no better example of this paradox than in the narrative of the westward expansion. We must consider the "lions" of the West, but it was the unnoticed thousands on foot and on horseback, in wagons and ox carts, who made the story a fact, who wrote history with their hands and feet, their need and greed , their sweat, and often their blood."

Well put, but if there is a "paradox" to Lions, it's surely one of Morgan's own making. There's more than a few drams of disingenuousness in laying the narrow path of his own project — focused on celebrities as varied as Thomas Jefferson and John "Johnny Appleseed" Chapman, but all celebrities nonetheless — at the feet of historiographical habit. Academic historians, and some civilians, too, have spent a generation or three scouring out-of-the-way archives and family attics for various micro-histories of everyday life; that Morgan prefers as sources big, popular bestsellers about big names is an authorial choice, and not necessarily an ignoble or contradictory one. Lions of the West reads best as the sort of folk hagiography few risk writing for adults anymore: one that lionizes its sub-titular "heroes and villains of the westward expansion" precisely by turning them into everyday lambs, composite commoners. Thus, Morgan's fine nose for telling mundanity: We get Jefferson's exhaustive instructions to Lewis and Clark, touchingly geeky on matters of flora and fauna. And, across several chapters, the apparent centrality of widow marriage as a means of wealth accretion in the early Republic. And dancing as key to the backwoodsman's character. (David Crockett and Sam Houston could get down; James Polk could not.)

Concluding oddly early — in 1849, with the end of the Mexican- American War and the start of the California Gold Rush — Morgan's pocket profiles ring more than a bit mythological. (Reading his treatments of Sam Houston and Winfield Scott, one can't help wondering if horses stand around exchanging stories of how many different human officers were once shot off the back of some illustrious ancestor in the heat of battle.) But the freedom from fact, as such, also makes possible a deceptive shrewdness, and timeliness. "Not until Richard Nixon," Morgan writes of James Polk, "would another president be so concerned with secrecy, claiming both executive privilege and national security." Might Nixon be today remembered as quietly effective as Polk — who pushed the U.S. to the Pacific, through war, treaty, and cunning — if, like Polk, he quit in triumph after one term? Meanwhile, the reader's sense of Andrew Jackson, Polk's mentor, is built less in the chapter devoted to him than in the way he lurks in the background of all the others — the only ex-president, perhaps, that successfully installed himself as a sort of American Putin.

Still, Lions of the West can't really detach itself from a hundred years of having learned better — of a basic skepticism to uncomplicated Destiny — and its attempts to square the circle are problematic. "Sadly," Morgan writes, "Jackson's populism (and Polk's) was a vision of liberty that did not extend to African Americans. While defending and extending the rights of common people, it apparently did not occur to them that the common man included all races and ethnic groups, not to mention women of the common people." This is offered as a blind spot, an "irony," yet more likely his lions understood in a way Morgan can't, or won't, that certain "rights" — like title to land — really are zero-sum games.

Jonathan Liu is a reviewer and journalist who has written for The New York Observer, Gawker.com, and The Harvard Book Review.Reviewer: Jonathan Liu

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616201890
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 8/21/2012
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 680,880
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 8.82 (h) x 1.42 (d)

Meet the Author


ROBERT MORGAN is the author of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, most notably his novel Gap Creek and his biography of Daniel Boone, both of which were national bestsellers. A professor at Cornell University since 1971 and visiting writer-in-residence at half a dozen universities, his awards include Guggenheim and Rockefeller fellowships and an Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature. He was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2010. Find him online at www.robert-morgan.com.
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Table of Contents

List of Maps x

Brief Chronology of the Westward Expansion Era xi

Presidents and Vice Presidents before the Civil War xvi

Prologue. The Empire for Liberty xvii

1 Seeing the Elephant Thomas Jefferson 1

2 Old Hickory at the Bend Andrew Jackson 45

3 Apples and Angels John Chapman 90

4 Comedian and Martyr, His Life and Death David Crockett 114

5 The President Who Loved to Dance Sam Houston 151

6 Young Hickory Keeps a Diary James K. Polk 195

7 Old Fuss and Feathers Goes to the Mountain Winfield Scott 257

8 Taking Boone's Trace to the Pacific Kit Carson 306

9 The Search for a Father Voice Nicholas Trist 351

Epilogue: Old Man Eloquent John Quincy Adams 392

Acknowledgments 413

Notes 417

Bibliography 461

Index 469

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 16, 2012

    Not worth the money

    I picked this up on a trip out west oddly enough. It's a good place to start as an introduction of the westward expansion and some of the key figures. There is a lot of reference to books currently on the shelf. If you’re interested in the topic, pick up those books and save yourself the trouble.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 1, 2012

    Nice Primer

    This book serves as a nice introduction to many of the Americans most responsible for the westward expansion.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2011

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    Posted November 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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