Lissy's Friends

Overview

What do you do when you’re the new girl at school? If you’re Lissy, you make a friend. A paper friend. And to Lissy’s surprise, her little origami bird opens his eyes and says hello! So she quickly makes more friends. And soon Lissy has more friends than she can count!

But what do you do when your friends have to leave? If you’re Lissy, you make another friend . . . but this time one that stays.

Utterly ...

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Overview

What do you do when you’re the new girl at school? If you’re Lissy, you make a friend. A paper friend. And to Lissy’s surprise, her little origami bird opens his eyes and says hello! So she quickly makes more friends. And soon Lissy has more friends than she can count!

But what do you do when your friends have to leave? If you’re Lissy, you make another friend . . . but this time one that stays.

Utterly imaginative and charming, Lissy’s Friends is a fresh take on the importance of friendship.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Poor Lissy finds that being the new girl in school is very lonely. Finishing her lunch early and seeking company, she makes a paper crane from the menu. To her surprise and delight, the crane she calls Menu blinks at her and flutters her wings. The next day, Lissy makes many more origami friends for herself from colored paper, so she is not alone any more. One day, she takes these new friends to the playground. Soon, they are spinning so fast on the merry-go-round that the wind carries them away. But a girl there finds Menu and asks Lissy to show her how she made it. Soon, Lissy has real friends. The cover illustration displays the emphasis Lin places on the decorated papers she uses for her visualization of the simple, imaginative story. Lissy uses these to make her many animal friends, but they also appear throughout the pages as wallpaper, rugs, furniture coverings, an umbrella, and clothing. The overall impression is decorative, in keeping with the light-hearted but mystical narrative. Instructions for folding a paper crane appear on the back end-pages. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2
Lissy, a new girl at school, discovers that her imagination can help her make friends when an inspiration comes from an unlikely source. Sitting alone in the cafeteria, she folds her menu into a little paper crane. (If the story has a bumpy moment, this is it. A school cafeteria table that offers a menu is unusual if not an anomaly.) She names the paper figure "Menu," and it can blink and flutter its wings. Lissy's mom asks her if she has made any friends that day at school and she truthfully replies, "I did make one friend." She makes many more, but when she leads the origami cats, dogs, birds, and a giraffe to the playground, they are swept away by a gust of wind. A girl named Paige returns Menu to Lissy and asks if she'll show her how to make a crane of her own. Well-illustrated directions for folding a paper crane are appended. The illustrations are bright and variously patterned, much like a busy Matisse, but also call to mind quality origami paper. Children will find the artwork compelling and the story of making friends of interest.
—Teresa PfeiferCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Shy Lissy feels alone with no friends at her new school. By herself at lunch, she transforms the red menu into an origami paper crane that, in her imagination, comes to life. Encouraged by her solution to her loneliness, Lissy continues to fold and bend paper each day, creating a menagerie of origami animals to keep her company. But her paper friends are too light for a strong wind at the playground, and in the blustery weather are carried away through the air. Only the crane remains, rescued by another little girl who returns it to Lissy and initiates a new friendship. Soon Lissy's circle of friends expands as she provides origami instruction in exchange for camaraderie. Set against a background of origami design papers, Lin's bright colorful paintings of an Asian girl amid a diverse group of children bring out the typical theme of friendship juxtaposed with the symbolism of the paper crane representing peace and happiness. A quiet, tender story of one child's coping strategy with a successful and creative outcome. Instructions for origami paper crane appended. (Picture book. 4-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780670060726
  • Publisher: Viking Juvenile
  • Publication date: 5/17/2007
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 622,737
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Grace Lin

Grace Lin lives in Somerville, Massachusetts. She has written and illustrated many children’s books, including Year of the Dog and Dim Sum for Everyone.

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