Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century

Overview

This wide-ranging collection of critical essays on literary journalism addresses the shifting border between fiction and non-fiction, literature and journalism.

Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century addresses general and historical issues, explores questions of authorial intent and the status of the territory between literature and journalism, and offers a case study of Mary McCarthy’s 1953 piece, "Artists in Uniform," a classic of ...

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Overview

This wide-ranging collection of critical essays on literary journalism addresses the shifting border between fiction and non-fiction, literature and journalism.

Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century addresses general and historical issues, explores questions of authorial intent and the status of the territory between literature and journalism, and offers a case study of Mary McCarthy’s 1953 piece, "Artists in Uniform," a classic of literary journalism.

Sims offers a thought-provoking study of the nature of perception and the truth, as well as issues facing journalism today.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Sims's essay shows that journalism scholars have the potential not only to find new subjects for study and new methods of analysis but to develop new ways of writing about what they learn."---American Journalism

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810125193
  • Publisher: Northwestern University Press
  • Publication date: 11/4/2008
  • Series: Medill Visions of the American Press Series
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


 Norman H. Sims is a professor of journalism at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, the editor of The Literary Journalists, the author of True Stories, and the coeditor with Mark Kramer of Literary Journalism. He lives in Deerfield, Massechusetts.

John C. Hartsock is an associate professor of communication studies at the State University of New York at Cortland and the author of A History of American Literary Journalism: The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form.

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Table of Contents

Part I

1. A Third Way to Tell the Story: American Literary Journalism at the Turn of the Century, by Thomas B. Connery

            2. Hemingway’s Permanent Records, by Ronald Weber

            3. The Mother of Literature: Journalism and The Grapes of Wrath, by William Howarth

            4. Joseph Mitchell and The New Yorker Nonfiction Writers, by Norman Sims

            5. The Politics of The New Journalism, by John J. Pauly
 

Part II

6. The Borderlands of Culture: Writing by W. E. B. Du Bois, James Agee, Tillie Olsen, and Gloria Anzaldúa, by Shelley Fisher Fishkin

            7. The Politics of the Plain Style, by Hugh Kenner

            8. The New Journalism and the Image-World, by David Eason

            9. John McPhee Balances the Act, by Kathy Smith

Part III

10. Artists in Uniform, by Mary McCarthy

            11. Settling the Colonel’s Hash, by Mary McCarthy

            12. Unsettling the Colonel’s Hash: ‘Fact’ in Autobiography, by Darrel Mansell

Selected Bibliography
Contributors

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