Literature and Censorship in Renaissance England

Overview

Censorship is one of the key controversies debated by Renaissance historians and literary critics. They are divided over a number of questions: Was there once a concerted plan to censor all material hostile to the status quo; or did authorities only intervene in periods of acute crisis? Did authorities actually read the material referred to them? This is the first collection to bring together the key figures in the field, with essays by Richard Burt, Janet Clare, Cyndia Clegg, ...

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Overview

Censorship is one of the key controversies debated by Renaissance historians and literary critics. They are divided over a number of questions: Was there once a concerted plan to censor all material hostile to the status quo; or did authorities only intervene in periods of acute crisis? Did authorities actually read the material referred to them? This is the first collection to bring together the key figures in the field, with essays by Richard Burt, Janet Clare, Cyndia Clegg, Richard Dutton, Richard McCabe, and Annabel Patterson.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780333794104
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 8/28/2001
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: The Politics of Early Modern Censorship—Andrew Hadfield
Part I: Theatrical Censorship
• Theatrical Censorship and Negotiation—Janet Clare
• Puritan Tribulation and the Protestant History Play—Stephen Longstaffe
• Elizabethan Protest, Disorder, and "Precautionary" Playing Restraints: Social Control Masquerading as Plague Control—Barbara Freedman
• The Censorship of A Gate at Chess —Richard Dutton
Part II: Religious Censorship
• Right Puissance and Terrible Priests: The Role of the Anglican Church in Elizabethan State Censorship—Richard McCabe
• What is a Catholic Poem?: Explicitness and Censorship in Tudor and Stuart Religious Verse—Alison Shell
• John Foxe and the Godly Commonwealth, 1563-1641—David Loades
• Archbishop Laud and the Licensing of Books for the Press—Arnold Hunt
Part III: Political Censorship
• Censoring Ireland in Early Modern England—Andrew Hadfield
• Burbaning Books as Propaganda in Jacobean England—Cyndia Clegg
• The Censorship of Andrew Marvell—Annabel Patterson

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