Literature Portfolio: An Anthology of Reading / Edition 1

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Literature Portfolio: An Anthology of Readings1/e: Back Cover Copy

Literature Portfolio: An Anthology of Readings incorporates the best of short fiction, poetry, and drama all into one compact, affordable text. The text is organized around the guiding principle that reading and writing are complementary skills that need to be taught together. In addition, reading and writing coverage are integrated throughout the book to reinforce their importance in every lesson. All of the selections are organized by genre, and then sub-organized into broader chronological periods to provide readers with an understanding of the features that define each genre and to illustrate how they have developed over time.

Literature Portfolio: An Anthology of Readings also includes sections dedicated to reading and writing about literature. These chapters address a wide array of subjects including:

· Discussion of reading and writing about literature in the three genres and across genres including comparison.

· Comprehensive discussions of the writing process, literary research, and documentation.

· Suggestions for thematic combinations, paired readings for select authors, and headnotes that provide literary hooks to help engage students.

· Genre-specific writing problems

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131935082
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/15/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 1500
  • Product dimensions: 6.02 (w) x 8.92 (h) x 1.13 (d)

Table of Contents

Prentice Hall LITERATURE PORTFOLIO

Table of Contents

  1. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

    CHAPTER 2: READING TO BECOME “SYMBOL-WISE”

    Introduction

    To Teach

    To Delight

    Identification

    Becoming “Symbol-Wise,” or the Uses of Literature

    Taking a Position as a Reader

    CHAPTER 3: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE

    Introduction

    Establishing the Requirements of the Assignment

    Prewriting

    Developing Your Argument

    Drafting Your Essay

    Reviewing Your Essay

    Revising Your Essay

    Editing and Proofreading

    Common Writing Assignments

    Conclusion

    CHAPTER 4: READING AND WRITING ABOUT SHORT STORIES

    Introduction

    What is a Short Story?

    Elements of Short Stories

    Strategies for Reading Short Stories

    Strategies for Writing about Short Stories

    Ways of Writing about Short Stories

    Conclusion

    CHAPTER 5: AN ANTHOLOGY OF SHORT STORIES

    Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown”

    Nathaniel Hawthorne, “The Birthmark”

    Herman Melville, “Bartleby the Scrivener”

    Sarah Orne Jewett, “A White Heron”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “The Tell-Tale Heart”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “The Cask of Amontillado”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “The Black Cat”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “The Purloined Letter”

    Leo Tolstoy, “The Death of Ivan Ilych”

    Mark Twain, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”

    Anton Chekhov, “Vanka”

    Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”

    Kate Chopin, “Désirée’s Baby”

    James Joyce, “Araby”

    Franz Kafka, “The Metamorphosis”

    Ernest Hemingway, “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”

    Katherine Ann Porter, “The Jilting of Granny Weatherall”

    William Faulkner, “A Rose for Emily”

    John Steinbeck, “The Chrysanthemums”

    Ralph Ellison, “Battle Royal”

    Isaac Bashevis Singer, “Gimpel the Fool”

    Flannery O’Connor, “Good Country People”

    Chinua Achebe, “Why the Tortoise’s Shell is Not Smooth”

    John Updike, “A & P”

    Gabriel Garciá Márquez, “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World”

    Toni Cade Bambara, “The Lesson”

    Alice Walker, “Everyday Use”

    Jamaica Kincaid, “Girl”

    Margaret Atwood, “Gertrude Talks Back”

    Louise Erdrich, “The Red Convertible”

    Bharati Mukherjee, “A Wife’s Story”

    Tim O’Brien, “Stockings”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “Tales Told under the Mango Tree”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “Arturo’s Flight”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “More Room”

    Trudy Lewis, “Limestone Diner”

    John Edgar Wideman, “What We Cannot Speak About We Must Pass Over in Silence”

    CHAPTER 6: READING AND WRITING ABOUT POETRY

    Introduction

    What is Poetry?

    Elements of Poetry

    Strategies for Reading Poetry

    Strategies for Writing about Poems

    Ways of Writing about Poems

    CHAPTER 7: AN ANTHOLOGY OF POETRY

    Caedmon’s Hymn

    “The Husband’s Message”

    “The Wife’s Lament”

    Old English Riddles

    “Horn”

    “Anchor”

    “Book”

    “Bookworm”

    “Reed”

    Geoffrey Chaucer, “Complaint to His Purse”

    Medieval Lyrical Poetry

    “Summer is i-comin’ in”

    “Between March and April”

    “I sing of a maiden that is matchless”

    “Fowls in the frith”

    Anonymous Ballads

    “Bonny Barbara Allan” (Child Ballad #84)

    “Sir Patrick Spens” (Child Ballad #58)

    “Lord Randall” (Child Ballad #12)

    Aphra Behn, “On Her Loving Two Equally”

    Aphra Behn, “Song”

    Ann Bradstreet, “To My Dear and Loving Husband”

    Ann Bradstreet, “The Author to Her Book”

    John Donne, “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning”

    John Donne, “The Flea”

    John Donne, “The Apparition”

    John Donne, Holy Sonnet 14, “Batter my heart, three-personed God”

    John Donne, Holy Sonnet 10, “Death, be not proud”

    Michael Drayton, Sonnet 61, “Since there’s no help, come, let us kiss and part”

    George Herbert, “Easter Wings”

    George Herbert, “The Collar”

    George Herbert, “The Pulley”

    Robert Herrick, “To the Virgins”

    Ben Jonson, “On My First Son”

    Ben Jonson, “On My First Daughter”

    Christopher Marlowe, “The Passionate Shepherd to his Love”

    Walter Ralegh, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd”

    Andrew Marvell, “To His Coy Mistress”

    Andrew Marvell, “The Mower, Against Gardens”

    John Milton, Sonnet 19, “When I consider how my light is spent”

    John Milton, Lycidas

    William Shakespeare, Sonnet 18, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”

    William Shakespeare, Sonnet 73, “That time of year thou mayst in me behold”

    William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116, “Let me not to the marriage of true minds”

    William Shakespeare, Sonnet 130, “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”

    Jonathan Swift, “A Description of the Morning”

    Jonathan Swift, “Stella’s Birth-Day, 1724-5”

    Jonathan Swift, “Phyllis, or The Progress of Love”

    Jonathan Swift, “On the Vowels”

    Jonathan Swift, “On a Pair of Dice”

    Jonathan Swift, “On Ink”

    Chidiock Tichborne, “My prime of youth is but a frost of cares”

    Phillis Wheatley, “A Funeral Poem on the Death of C. E. an Infant of Twelve Months”

    Phillis Wheatley, “To a Lady on Her Remarkable Preservation in an Hurricane in North Carolina”

    Lady Mary Wroth, “In this strange Labyrinth how shall I turn”

    Lady Mary Wroth, “When night's blacke Mantle could most darknesse proue,”Sir Thomas Wyatt, “They flee from me that sometime did me seek”

    William Blake, “Infant Joy”

    William Blake, “The Lamb”

    William Blake, “The Tiger”

    William Blake, “London”

    Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sonnet 14, “If thou must love me, let it be for naught”

    Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sonnet 43, “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways”

    Robert Browning, “Porphyria’s Lover”

    Robert Browning, “My Last Duchess”

    Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”

    Robert Burns, “A Red, Red Rose”

    Robert Burns, “John Barleycorn: A Ballad”

    George Gordon, Lord Byron, “She walks in beauty”

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Frost at Midnight”

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Kubla Kahn”

    Gerard Manley Hopkins, “Pied Beauty”

    Gerard Manley Hopkins, “The Child is Father to the Man”

    Gerard Manley Hopkins, “God’s Grandeur”

    John Keats, “La Belle Dame sans Merci”

    John Keats, “Ode on a Grecian Urn”

    Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Ozymandias”

    William Wordsworth, “I wandered lonely as a cloud”

    William Wordsworth, “Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802”

    Matthew Arnold, “Dover Beach”

    Matthew Arnold, “Shakespeare”

    Lewis Carroll, “Jabberwocky”

    Emily Dickinson, “Because I could not stop for Death”

    Emily Dickinson, “Hope is the thing with feathers”

    Emily Dickinson, “I heard a fly buzz – when I died”

    W. E. B. Du Bois, “The Song of the Smoke”

    Paul Laurence Dunbar, “We wear the mask that grins and lies”

    Paul Laurence Dunbar, “Sympathy

    Michael Field, “A Pen-Drawing of Leda”

    Michael Field, “The Mummy Invokes His Soul

    Angelina Weld Grimké, “The Black Finger”

    Angelina Weld Grimké, “Tenebris”

    Angelina Weld Grimké, “A Mona Lisa”

    Thomas Hardy, “The Convergence of the Twain”

    Thomas Hardy, “’Ah, are you digging on my grave?’”

    Thomas Hardy, “The Ruined Maid”

    Frances E. W. Harper, “The Slave Mother: A Tale of the Ohio”

    Frances E. W. Harper, “The Slave Auction”

    Frances E. W. Harper, “The Burial of Moses”

    A. E. Housman, “To An Athlete Dying Young

    A. E. Housman, “Terence, this is stupid stuff”

    Rudyard Kipling, “If”

    Rudyard Kipling, “Danny Deever”

    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Jewish Cemetery at Newport”

    Wilfred Owen, “Dulce et Decorum Est”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “Annabel Lee”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “The Haunted Palace”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “The Raven”

    Edgar Allan Poe, “To Helen”

    Edward Arlington Robinson, “Richard Cory”

    Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market”

    Alfred, Lord Tennyson, “Ulysses”

    Alfred, Lord Tennyson, “The Charge of the Light Brigade”

    Walt Whitman, “O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done”

    Walt Whitman, “When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom’d”

    Walt Whitman, “A Noiseless Patient Spider”

    Oscar Wilde, “The Ballad of Reading Gaol”

    Anna Akhmatova, “Lot’s Wife”

    Sherman Alexie, “Reservation Love Song”

    Maya Angelou, “Still I Rise”

    Gloria Anzaldúa, “horse”

    John Ashbery, “Paradoxes and Oxymorons”

    Margaret Atwood, “You fit into me”

    Margaret Atwood, “Siren Song”

    W. H. Auden, “Musée des Beaux Arts”

    W. H. Auden, “The Unknown Citizen”

    Wendell Berry, “Another Descent”

    Wendell Berry, “The Peace of Wild Things”

    Elizabeth Bishop, “The Fish”

    Elizabeth Bishop, “One Art”

    Elizabeth Bishop, “Sestina”

    Louise Bogan, “Women”

    Louise Bogan, “The Dream”

    Gwendolyn Brooks, “The Pool Players: Seven at the Golden Shovel”

    Gwendolyn Brooks, “The Bean Eaters”

    Gwendolyn Brooks, “The mother”

    Hayden Carruth, “An Apology for Using the Word ‘Heart’ in Too Many Poems”

    Marilyn Chin, “Turtle Soup”

    Marilyn Chin, “Autumn Leaves”

    Lucille Clifton, “at the cemetery, walnut grove plantation, south carolina, 1989”

    Lucille Clifton, “my mama moved among the days”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “Cold as Heaven”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “Claims”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer “The Other”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “Learning to Walk Alone”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “The Names of the Dead”

    Judith Ortiz Cofer, “The Woman Who Was Left at the Altar”

    Countee Cullen, “From the Dark Tower”

    e.e. cummings, “since feeling is first”

    e.e. cummings, “in Just—”

    e.e. cummings, “Buffalo Bill’s”

    e.e. cummings, “next to of course god america I”

    James Dickey, “The Heaven of Animals”

    Bart Edelman, “Chemistry Experiment”

    T.S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

    T.S. Eliot, “The Naming of Cats”

    Louise Erdrich, “A Love Medicine”

    Louise Erdrich, “Family Reunion”

    Louise Erdrich, “Windigo”

    Carolyn Forché, “The Colonel”

    Ruth Forman, “Cancer”

    Robert Frost, “Out, Out--”

    Robert Frost, “Birches”

    Robert Frost, “Design”

    Robert Frost, “Mending Wall”

    Robert Frost, “The Death of the Hired Man”

    Robert Frost, “The Silken Tent”

    Robert Frost, “Acquainted with the Night”

    Robert Frost, “After Apple Picking”

    Richard Garcia, “Why I Left the Church”

    Allen Ginsberg, “Howl,” Part 1

    Dana Gioia, “California Hills in August”

    Dana Gioia, “Unsaid”

    Louise Glück, “The School Children”

    Louise Glück, “Gratitude”

    Louise Glück, “Circe’s Power”

    Jorie Graham, “Reading Plato”

    Robert Graves, “The Naked and the Nude”

    H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), “Helen”

    Marilyn Hacker, “Villanelle for D. G. B.”

    Joy Harjo, “She had some horses”

    Joy Harjo, “The Woman Hanging from the Thirteenth Floor Window”

    Robert Hayden, “Those Winter Sundays”

    Seamus Heaney, “Digging”

    Seamus Heaney, “Punishment”

    Anthony Hecht, “The Dover Bitch”

    Anthony Hecht, “The Book of Yolek”

    Brian Henry, “Garage Sale”

    Langston Hughes, “Theme for English B”

    Langston Hughes, “Harlem (1951)”

    Langston Hughes, “I, Too, Sing America”

    Randall Jarrell, “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner”

    Galway Kinnell, “The Bear”

    Galway Kinnell, “Wait”

    Yusef Komunyakaa, “Facing It”

    Yusef Komunyakaa, “My Father’s Love Letters”

    Yusef Komunyakaa, “Starlight Scope Myopia”

    Li-Young Lee, “Persimmons”

    Li-Young Lee, “The Gift”

    Ursula K. Le Guin, “The Old Falling Down”

    Denise Levertov, “The Ache of Marriage”

    Denise Levertov, “What Were They Like?”

    Denise Levertov, “O Taste and See”

    Audre Lorde, “Hanging Fire”

    Robert Lowell, “Skunk Hour”

    Louis MacNeice, “Snow”

    Florence Cassen Mayers, “All-American Sestina”

    Claude McKay, “America”

    Claude McKay, “In Bondage”

    Claude McKay, “Harlem Shadows”

    Edna St. Vincent Millay, Sonnet 42 “What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why”

    Judith Minty, “Conjoined”

    Ogden Nash, “The Hunter”

    Ogden Nash, “Celery”

    Ogden Nash, “Very Like a Whale”

    Ogden Nash, “The Tale of Custard the Dragon”

    Joyce Carol Oates, “Loving”

    Sharon Olds, “I Go Back to May 1937”

    Simon Ortiz, “Speaking”

    Dorothy Parker, “One Perfect Rose”

    Dorothy Parker, “Solace”

    Marge Piercy, “Barbie Doll”

    Sylvia Plath, “Daddy”

    Sylvia Plath, “Metaphors”

    Ezra Pound, “In a Station of the Metro”

    Ezra Pound, “The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter”

    Dudley Randall, “Ballad of Birmingham”

    Claudia Rankine, “Him”

    Henry Reed, “Naming of Parts”

    Adrienne Rich, “Diving into the Wreck”

    Adrienne Rich, “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers”

    Alberto Rios, “Nani”

    Alberto Rios, “The Vietnam Wall”

    Theodore Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz”

    Theodore Roethke, “The Waking”

    Carl Sandburg, “Fog”

    Carl Sandburg, “Chicago”

    Carl Sandburg, “Grass”

    Anne Sexton, “To a Friend Whose Work Has Come to Triumph”

    Leslie Marmon Silko, “Prayer to the Pacific”

    Charles Simic, “Old Couple”

    Cathy Song, “Girl Powdering Her Neck”

    William Stafford, “Traveling through the Dark”

    William Stafford, “At the Bomb Testing Site”

    Maura Stanton, “Childhood”

    Wallace Stevens, “The Emperor of Ice Cream”

    Wallace Stevens, “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird”

    Wallace Stevens, “Of Mere Being”

    Mark Strand, “Eating Poetry”

    Dylan Thomas, “Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night”

    Dylan Thomas, “Fern Hill”

    Dylan Thomas, “A Refusal to Mourn the Death, by Fire, of a Child in London”

    Richard Wilbur, “Junk”

    William Carlos Williams, “The Red Wheelbarrow”

    William Carlos Williams, “Spring and All”

    John Yau, “Chinese Villanelle”

    William Butler Yeats, “Leda and the Swan”

    William Butler Yeats, “Sailing to Byzantium”

    Kevin Young, “Langston Hughes”

    Kevin Young, “Nineteen Seventy-Five”

    CHAPTER 8: READING AND WRITING ABOUT DRAMA

    Introduction

    What is Drama?

    Elements of Drama

    Strategies for Reading Drama

    Strategies for Writing about Drama

    Further Ways of Writing about Drama

    CHAPTER 9: AN ANTHOLOGY OF DRAMA

    Sophocles, Antigone

    Everyman

    William Shakespeare, Taming of the Shrew

    William Shakespeare, Hamlet

    Susan Glaspell, Trifles

    Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

    Henrik Ibsen, A Doll House

    Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman

    Tennessee Williams, The Glass Menagerie

    Marsha Norman,’Night Mother

    August Wilson, The Piano Lesson

    CHAPTER 10: LITERARY RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION

    Introduction

    Locating and Evaluating Print Sources

    Locating and Evaluating Electronic Sources

    Documenting Sources

    In-Text Parenthetical Citations

    Works Cited Page

    Conclusion

    CHAPTER 11: READING AND WRITING INTERTEXTUALLY / ACROSS GENRES

    Introduction

    Intertextual References

    Writing about Intertextuality and across Generic Boundaries

    Three Casebooks

    Conclusion

    GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS

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