Literatures of the Middle East / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$21.74
(Save 83%)
Est. Return Date: 11/19/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$79.58
(Save 39%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $6.90
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 94%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (25) from $6.90   
  • New (11) from $36.63   
  • Used (14) from $6.85   

Overview

This extraordinary anthology gathers together a broad selection of representative, authoritative writings—spanning antiquity to the present—from the non-Western civilizations of the Middle East. It combines extensive introductions, headnotes, and bibliographies with excellent literary translations of the best contemporary and classical writers. The selections reflect literary, religious, and philosophical traditions and reveal—despite cultural differences—the universality of life experiences. Primary literary genres (poetry, fiction, and drama) as well as key religions, philosophical, historic, aesthetic, biographical and political texts are covered. For readers of Middle Eastern, World, and Non-Western Literature.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130464378
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 9/12/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 487
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.89 (h) x 1.26 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Literatures of the Middle East has been designed to present teachers and students with a textbook representative of the finest works of this province of world literature, one that is amenable to many different teaching approaches. This book includes a wealth of materials, so as to give teachers choices that they can tailor to their own preferences, needs, and expertise. This capaciousness will allow students to read around in authors, periods, arid traditions that particularly excite them, supplementing assigned reading and providing an essential source book for their individual research. Teaching such a broad spectrum of texts may be challenging, and with this in mind we have supported the literary texts with a full apparatus: a general introduction, section introductions, and extensive headnotes. These supporting materials provide broad and specific contexts, placing literary texts within important cultural, linguistic, and historical movements. In addition, the headnotes include up-to-date bibliographies to guide students for further research.

Translations have been selected primarily for their literary quality because we firmly believe that it is a disservice to students, professors, and authors to present a great work of literature in an English translation that does not read as literature. The depth and quality of these texts demand excellent translations, so that students and professors may encounter them in a form that preserves their artistic integrity and delight. The translators featured here are among the finest in their fields, and many are themselves prominent writers. They include Richard Burton, Ezra Pound, Chana -Bloch, Stephen Mitchell, Denys Johnson-Davies, Robert Pinsky, Robert Alter, Daniel Halpern, and Paul Bowles, among others. Our one rule has been to include no translation that is merely adequate. In a sense, then, this text is a showcase for the art of literary translation, and our hope has been to compile an anthology that students will want to take home with them and to read around in long after the course is completed.

In addition to literary texts, Literatures of the Middle East includes selections from religious and philosophical texts that have literary merit, such as the Old Testament, the New Testament, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic and other intertestamental scriptures, and the Qnran, as well as Sufi poems and teaching stories. These beautiful works also provide a cosmological and cultural context for literary texts. Extensive headnotes and introductions trace out religious movements and influence, giving students a broad overview of world religions, which have often inspired and been an essential part of world literatures.

In dealing with many literatures written in many languages, a special problem is presented by the question of orthography. Generally speaking, we have chosen to use those transliteration systems that are best designed for the general, nonspecialist reader, for whom a more scholarly orthography would prove less informative.

We would like to thank the scholars who have contributed to the project: Richard Serrano and Ariel Bloch for suggestions and comments on the selections. We would also like to thank Richard Serrano for helping us regularize and simplify the orthography for the Arabic sections, and especially to thank Ericka Embry, David Livingston, and Ayame Fukuda for their essential help in research, typing, organization, and in the thousand small tasts that a project like this entails. Ayame Fukuda provided essential research help and also co-wrote several introductions. We would also like to thank Carrie Brandon, who had the vision to see the need for this book to see light.

We would also like to acknowledge the following reviewers: Ali Jimale Ahmed, Queens College; Peter Edmunds, Lansing (MI) Community College; Lydia Liv, University of California, Berkeley; Michael Palencia-Roth, University of Illinois; Herman Rapaport, University of Iowa; and Lois Parkinson Zamora, University of Houston.

WILLIS BARNSTONE AND TONY BARNSTONE

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction.

SUMERIAN, AKKADIAN, AND EGYPTIAN LITERATURES.

The Pyramid Texts (funeral poems) (Egypt) (2464-2355 B.C.).

Enheduanna (poems) (Sumer) (c. 2300 B.C.).

from The Epic of Gilgamesh (epic poem) (Babylonia) (c. 2000 B.C.).

Adapa: The Man (myth) (Babylonia) (2nd millennium B.C.).

The Shipwrecked Sailor (story) (Egypt) (c. 2040-1650 B.C.).

Tale of the Doomed Prince (story) (Egypt) (c. 2040-1650 B.C.).

The Book of the Dead (spells) (Egypt) (c. 1500 B.C.).

Ancient Egyptian Love Poems (poems) (Egypt) (1554-1085 B.C.).

BIBLICAL LITERATURE: OLD TESTAMENT, NEW TESTAMENT, AND INTERTESTAMENT.

Introduction.

The Old Testament (11th century to 1st century B.C.) Israel.

Genesis.

Job.

Songs of David (Psalms).

Ecclesiastes, or the Preacher.

The Song of Songs.

Isaiah.

Daniel.

Jewish Apocrypha.

NEW TESTAMENT (55-100).

Matthew (gospel) (Israel or Syrian Antioch) (A.D. 80-110).

Mark (gospel) (Israel, Syria, Alexandria, or Rome?) (after A.D. 70).

Luke (gospel) (Place of composition unknown) (A.D. 80-85).

John (gospel) (Ephesus?) (between A.D. 80-120).

Paul (letter) (Tarsus/Jerusalem) (A.D. 5 to A.D. mid-60s).

Revelation (Ephesus or Patmos?) (apocalypse) (100?).

INTERTESTAMENT: JEWISH PSEUDOEPIGRAPHA, DEAD SEA SCROLLS, JEWISH-CHRISTIAN ODES, GNOSTIC SCRIPTURES (2nd CENTURY B.C. TO 3RD CENTURY A.D.)

The Book of Jubilees (Israel/Alexandria) (2nd century B.C.).

The Thanksgiving Psalms (Dead Sea Scrolls) (Israel) (1st century A.D.). Introduction to Gnosticism.

The Gospel of Thomas (prophecies, proverbs, and parables of Jesus) (Syria, Palestine, or Mesopotamia) (c. A.D. 200).

The Odes of Solomon (Syria?) (2nd century).

The Hymn of the Pearl (narrative poem) (Syria?) (2nd or 3rd century).

On the Origin of the World (Gnostic genesis) (Greek/Coptic Egypt) (3rd century).

NEOPLATONISM.

Plotinus (Neoplatonic philosophy) (Alexandria, Egypt) (205-270).

EARLY ARABIC LITERATURE.

Al-Khansa (poems) (Arabia) (575-646).

Muallaqat (The Suspended Odes) (Arabia) (6th-early 7th centuries).

The Quran (Arabia) (7th century).

Rabia the Mystic (poems and miracle story) (Iraq) (712-801).

Abu Nuwas (poem) (Persia/Baghdad) (b. between 747-762, d. between 813-815).

The Thousand and One Nights (tales) (Baghdad, Iraq) (c. 9th-14th centuries).

Usamah Ibn Munqidh (memoir) (Syria) (1095-1188).

POEMS OF ARAB ANDALUSIA.

Introduction (711-1492).

Ibn Shuhayd (Córdoba) (992-1034).

Ibn Hazm (Córdoba) (994-1064).

Solomon Ben Gabirol (Hebrew) (Máaga) (c.1021-1022-c.1055).

Ibn Ammar (Sevilla) (1030-1083).

Ibn Burd (Córdoba) (d. 1053).

Judah Halevi (Hebrew) (c. 1075-1141).

Abu l-Hasan Al-Hursi (Eastern Andalusia) (d. 1095).

Ibn Abi l-Haytham (uncertain period).

Ibn Iyad (Central Andalusia) (1083-1149).

Abu l-Hasan Ibn Al-Qabturnuh (Badajoz) (d. 1134).

Abu l-Qasim al-Manisi (Sevilla) (12th century).

PERSIAN LITERATURE.

Ferdowsi (epic poem) (Persia) (c. 940-1020).

Omar Khayyam (poems) (Persia) (c.1048- 1131).

Attar (Farid Ad-Din Attar) (poems) (Persia) (c.1120-1220).

Rumi (poems) (Persia/Turkey) (1207-1273).

Sadi (prose and poems) (Persia) (1184-1292).

Hafiz (poems) (Persia) (c. 1320-1390).

MODERN ARABIC, HEBREW, TURKISH, ALEXANDRIAN GREEK, AND PERSIAN LITERATURES.

Introduction.

Traditional Song (Algeria) (from uncertain period).

Constantine Cavafy (poems) (Alexandria/Egypt) (1863-1933).

S. Y. Agnon (story) (Israel) (1888-1970).

Nazim Hikmet (poem) (Turkey) (1902-1963).

Naguib Mahfouz (story) (Egypt) (1911-).

Mririda Nait Attik (poems) (Berber) (Morocco) (c.1919-).

Yashar Kemal (story) (Turkey) (1922-).

Nizar Qabbani (poems) (Syria) (1923-).

Yehuda Amichai (poems) (Israel) (1924-).

Badr Shakir al-Sayyab (poems) (Iraq) (1926-1964).

Yusuf Idris (story) (Egypt) (1927-1990).

Joyce Mansour (poems) (Egypt/England/France) (1928-1988).

Adunis (Ali Ahmed Said) (poems) (Syria/Lebanon) (1930-).

Dan Pagis (poems) (Israel) (1930-1986).

Nawal Al-Saadawi (story, memoir) (Egypt) (1931-).

Forugh Farrokhzad (poems) (Iran) (1935-1967).

Reza Baraheni (poem) (Iran) (1935-).

Dahlia Ravikovitch (poems) (Israel) (1936-).

Haydar Haydar (story) (Syria) (1936-).

Mohamed el-Bisatie (story) (Egypt) (1938-).

Amos Oz (story) (Israel) (1939-).

Mohammed Mrabet (story) (Morocco) (1940-).

Mahmud Darwish (poems) (Palestine/Lebanon) (1942-).

Hatif Janabi (poems) (Iraq/Poland) (1955-).

Khaled Mattawa (poems) (Libya) (1964-).

Read More Show Less

Preface

Literatures of the Middle East has been designed to present teachers and students with a textbook representative of the finest works of this province of world literature, one that is amenable to many different teaching approaches. This book includes a wealth of materials, so as to give teachers choices that they can tailor to their own preferences, needs, and expertise. This capaciousness will allow students to read around in authors, periods, arid traditions that particularly excite them, supplementing assigned reading and providing an essential source book for their individual research. Teaching such a broad spectrum of texts may be challenging, and with this in mind we have supported the literary texts with a full apparatus: a general introduction, section introductions, and extensive headnotes. These supporting materials provide broad and specific contexts, placing literary texts within important cultural, linguistic, and historical movements. In addition, the headnotes include up-to-date bibliographies to guide students for further research.

Translations have been selected primarily for their literary quality because we firmly believe that it is a disservice to students, professors, and authors to present a great work of literature in an English translation that does not read as literature. The depth and quality of these texts demand excellent translations, so that students and professors may encounter them in a form that preserves their artistic integrity and delight. The translators featured here are among the finest in their fields, and many are themselves prominent writers. They include Richard Burton, Ezra Pound, Chana -Bloch, Stephen Mitchell, Denys Johnson-Davies, Robert Pinsky, Robert Alter, Daniel Halpern, and Paul Bowles, among others. Our one rule has been to include no translation that is merely adequate. In a sense, then, this text is a showcase for the art of literary translation, and our hope has been to compile an anthology that students will want to take home with them and to read around in long after the course is completed.

In addition to literary texts, Literatures of the Middle East includes selections from religious and philosophical texts that have literary merit, such as the Old Testament, the New Testament, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic and other intertestamental scriptures, and the Qnran, as well as Sufi poems and teaching stories. These beautiful works also provide a cosmological and cultural context for literary texts. Extensive headnotes and introductions trace out religious movements and influence, giving students a broad overview of world religions, which have often inspired and been an essential part of world literatures.

In dealing with many literatures written in many languages, a special problem is presented by the question of orthography. Generally speaking, we have chosen to use those transliteration systems that are best designed for the general, nonspecialist reader, for whom a more scholarly orthography would prove less informative.

We would like to thank the scholars who have contributed to the project: Richard Serrano and Ariel Bloch for suggestions and comments on the selections. We would also like to thank Richard Serrano for helping us regularize and simplify the orthography for the Arabic sections, and especially to thank Ericka Embry, David Livingston, and Ayame Fukuda for their essential help in research, typing, organization, and in the thousand small tasts that a project like this entails. Ayame Fukuda provided essential research help and also co-wrote several introductions. We would also like to thank Carrie Brandon, who had the vision to see the need for this book to see light.

We would also like to acknowledge the following reviewers: Ali Jimale Ahmed, Queens College; Peter Edmunds, Lansing (MI) Community College; Lydia Liv, University of California, Berkeley; Michael Palencia-Roth, University of Illinois; Herman Rapaport, University of Iowa; and Lois Parkinson Zamora, University of Houston.

WILLIS BARNSTONE AND TONY BARNSTONE

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)