Lithium Batteries and other Electrochemical Storage Systems

Overview

Lithium batteries were introduced relatively recently in comparison to lead- or nickel-based batteries, which have been around for over 100 years. Nevertheless, in the space of 20 years, they have acquired a considerable market share – particularly for the supply of mobile devices. We are still a long way from exhausting the possibilities that they offer. Numerous projects will undoubtedly further improve their performances in the years to come. For large-scale storage systems, other types of batteries are also ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (11) from $115.56   
  • New (9) from $115.56   
  • Used (2) from $130.78   

Overview

Lithium batteries were introduced relatively recently in comparison to lead- or nickel-based batteries, which have been around for over 100 years. Nevertheless, in the space of 20 years, they have acquired a considerable market share – particularly for the supply of mobile devices. We are still a long way from exhausting the possibilities that they offer. Numerous projects will undoubtedly further improve their performances in the years to come. For large-scale storage systems, other types of batteries are also worthy of consideration: hot batteries and redox flow systems, for example.
This book begins by showing the diversity of applications for secondary batteries and the main characteristics required of them in terms of storage. After a chapter presenting the definitions and measuring methods used in the world of electrochemical storage, and another that gives examples of the applications of batteries, the remainder of this book is given over to describing the batteries developed recently (end of the 20th Century) which are now being commercialized, as well as those with a bright future. The authors also touch upon the increasingly rapid evolution of the technologies, particularly regarding lithium batteries, for which the avenues of research are extremely varied.

Contents

Part 1. Storage Requirements Characteristics of Secondary Batteries Examples of Use
1. Breakdown of Storage Requirements.
2. Definitions and Measuring Methods.
3. Practical Examples Using Electrochemical Storage.
Part 2. Lithium Batteries
4. Introduction to Lithium Batteries.
5. The Basic Elements in Lithium-ion Batteries: Electrodes, Electrolytes and Collectors.
6. Usual Lithium-ion Batteries.
7. Present and Future Developments Regarding Lithium-ion Batteries.
8. Lithium-Metal Polymer Batteries.
9. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.
10. Lithium-Air Batteries.
11. Lithium Resources.
Part 3. Other Types of Batteries
12. Other Types of Batteries.

About the Authors

Christian Glaize is Professor at the University of Montpellier, France. He is also Researcher in the Materials and Energy Group (GEM) of the Institute for Electronics (IES), France.
Sylvie Geniès is a project manager at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) in Grenoble, France.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848214965
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/12/2013
  • Series: ISTE Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Christian Glaize is Professor at the University of Montpellier, France. He is also Researcher in the Materials and Energy Group (GEM) of the Institute for Electronics (IES), France.

Sylvie Geniès is a project manager at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) in Grenoble, France.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface xiii

Acknowledgements xv

Introduction xvii

PART 1 STORAGE REQUIREMENTS CHARACTERISTICS OF SECONDARY BATTERIES EXAMPLES OF USE 1

Chapter 1 Breakdown of Storage Requirements 3

1.1.Introduction 3

1.2.Domains of application for energy storage 3

1.3.Review of storage requirements and appropriate technologies 18

1.4. Conclusion 19

Chapter 2. Definitions and Measuring Methods 21

2.1. Introduction 21

2.2.Terminology 21

2.3.Definitions of the characteristics 27

2.4.States of the battery 40

2.5.Faradaic efficiency 66

2.6.Self-discharge 67

2.7.Acceptance current 68

2.8.Conclusion 69

2.9.Appendix 1: Nernst’s law 69

2.10.Appendix 2: Double layer 78

2.11.Appendix 3: Warburg impedance 79

2.12.Solutions to the exercises in Chapter 2 82

Chapter 3. Practical Examples Using Electrochemical Storage 89

3.1.Introduction 89

3.2. Conclusion 109

3.3. Solution to the exercises in Chapter 3 110

PART 2. LITHIUM BATTERIES 115

Chapter 4.Introduction to Lithium Batteries 117

4.1.History of lithium batteries 117

4.2.Categories of lithium batteries 121

4.3. The different operational mechanisms for lithium batteries 122

4.4.Appendices 131

Chapter 5.The Basic Elements in Lithium-ion Batteries: Electrodes, Electrolytes and Collectors 135

5.1.Introduction 135

5.2.Operation of lithium-ion technology 136

5.3.Positive electrodes 138

5.4.Negative electrodes 146

5.5.Electrolyte 158

5.6.Current collectors 161

5.7.Conclusion 162

5.8.Solution to exercises in Chapter 5 162

Chapter 6. Usual Lithium-ion Batteries 167

6.1.Principle of operation of conventional assemblies of electrodes 167

6.2.Major characteristics 177

6.3.Solution to exercises from Chapter 6 230

Chapter 7.Present and Future Developments Regarding Lithium-ion Batteries 235

7.1.Improvement of the operation and safety of current technologies 236

7.2.Improvement of the intrinsic performances (energy, power) 244

7.3.New formats of batteries 252

7.4.Conclusion 255

Chapter 8. Lithium-Metal Polymer Batteries 257

8.1.Principle of operation 258

8.2.Manufacturing process 260

8.3.Main characteristics 261

Chapter 9.Lithium-Sulfur Batteries 263

9.1.Introduction 263

9.2.The element Sulfur 264

9.3.Principle of operation 264

9.4.Discharge curve 269

9.5.Advantages to Li-S 270

9.6.Limitations and disadvantages of a Li-S battery 271

9.7.Conclusion 285

Chapter 10.Lithium-Air Batteries 287

10.1.Introduction 287

10.2.Operational principle 289

10.3.Electrolytes 295

10.4.Main limitations 297

10.5.Main actors 304

10.6.Conclusion 306

10.7.Appendix: calculation of theoretical gravimetric energy densities 307

Chapter 11.Lithium Resources 309

11.1.State of the art in terms of availability of lithium resources 310

11.2.Comparison of resources with the needs of the electrical industry 312

11.3.State of the art of extraction techniques and known production reserves 315

11.4.Nature and geological origin of all potential lithium resources 318

11.5.Global geographic distribution of raw lithium resources 320

11.6.Evolution of the cost of lithium 323

11.7.Summary 325

PART 3.OTHER TYPES OF BATTERIES 327

Chapter 12.Other Types of Batteries 329

12.1.Introduction 329

12.2.Sodium–Sulfur technology 330

12.3.Nickel chloride batteries 335

12.4.Conclusions about high-temperature batteries 340

12.5.Redox flow systems 340

Conclusion 351

Index 353

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)