The Story of Little Black Sambo: With Twenty-Seven Illustrations

The Story of Little Black Sambo: With Twenty-Seven Illustrations

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by Helen Bannerman
     
 

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First published in London in 1899, this classic tale by Helen Bannerman tells the story of a little boy named Sambo who encounters four hunger tigers, outwits them, and turns them into butter, before returning safely home to eat a 169 pancakes for his supper.

Overview

First published in London in 1899, this classic tale by Helen Bannerman tells the story of a little boy named Sambo who encounters four hunger tigers, outwits them, and turns them into butter, before returning safely home to eat a 169 pancakes for his supper.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557094148
Publisher:
Applewood Books
Publication date:
04/28/1996
Series:
Wee Books for Wee Folk Series
Edition description:
REISSUE
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
214,315
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 5.38(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

HELEN BRODIE BANNERMAN (1862-1946) was born in Scotland. The daughter of a chaplain, she lived for over thirty years in India. She married a doctor in the Indian Medical Service and they had two daughters. THE STORY OF LITTLE BLACK SAMBO was written by Mrs. Bannerman to amuse her young girls during a long train journey and first published in 1899.

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Little Black Sambo 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
mtra11 More than 1 year ago
So glad to see I was able to purchase this book !!! It was a favorite of mine from my childhood. I hope more children will be able to read and enjoy this lovely story. I know that I enjoyed reading it again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was my favorite book as a child. The book I had was lost probably through moving, and then eventually banned from the bookshelves. I have searched off-and-on through my life for this book for my children (now grown with children of their own), to no avail. I now have the book again, thanks to a dear friend who sent it to me yesterday.I read the book last night and I cannot tell you how wonderful I felt reading this book again after so many years. I will be purchasing this book for my baby granddaughter for one of her Christmas gifts this year. The story about the little boy and the tigers is an exceptional story, and I thank everyone who was involved in bringing this book back.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I was small, my Aunt Alice used to read to me. I always had a very healthy appetite, and would munch while listening to story books. The Story of Little Black Sambo always stimulated my desire to eat a stack of pancakes with lots of oozing butter and Log Cabin syrup which came in a special tin back in the early 50's.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Favorite book from my childhood. Loved little boy getting best of greedy tigers by quick thinking. Never felt it was racist or demeaning as today's "politically correct" climate tries to make out it is.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this story. When I was little I ate at Sambo Restaurant, always pancakes. The pictures were from the story. On my Nook app letters and pictures are not complete. However in IBook they are beautiful and complete. Hope it gets fixed on the Nook. Thank you for the Happy Memories!
SunshineNC More than 1 year ago
An uplifting story from my childhood came to life on my Nook. Also a share book - my family enjoyed this very much!
Fran76MI More than 1 year ago
The pictures were all black & white; appeared to have been scanned and copied from an old version of the book; Black Sambo, Black Mumbo, and Black Jumbo were all drawn to look like pre-Civil War African-Americans instead of the Asian Indians which they were supposed to be. Only the storyline was the same as the book I remember from my childhood.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this story! My Grandpa used to tell me this story whenever I would spend the night at his house with fun voices and all! I don't quite see how this book is racist though. Sure the title is a little "un-politically inncorrect", however it does not depict a black or African American person, it is about an Indian child.  I see nothing degrading in it at all! Nor would I about any other nationality. I think the character is smart and is trying to be safe! He was smart to hide and let the tigers be greedy and chase each other until they turned into butter! He did nothing but be giving to be safe and the tigers were represented as selfish. Hey the old saying goes, "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade" ...let's change it to "When life gives you butter, make 169 pancakes!" I just love this story...it holds a really special place in my heart. I would love to share it with my class while we study folk tales and fairy tales, but not sure if that would be considered appropriate nowadays by the title. It's the 21st century, I wish everyone could just let it go and be a part of history! I've seen worse things than that in school! 
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The original glares at his dark side.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Satisfied*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My grandmother she read this bok when she was a little girl she is 56 but she will be 57 in june and on the 26 in june
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I see this racist book is stated to be black. Sambo is an East Indian character. And, was written by someone who did not seemingly know Indians are caucasion. I am proudly half East Indian and I don't remember any of my relatives sitting about in trees eating pancakes. My memory of Indians is of a beautiful, strong, spiritual people who would not write anything but loving things about other people. But, I truly enjoyed the review which said the reviewer remembered having the story read to her or him as a child. What a wonderful story.