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Little Bot and Sparrow
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Little Bot and Sparrow

4.0 1
by Jake Parker
 

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A story of friendship that can inspire anyone, even robots, to dream . . .

When Little Bot is thrown out with the garbage, he finds himself in a strange new world. Fortunately, Sparrow is there to take him under her wing. Together, they explore the forest, share adventures, and learn what it means to be forever friends.

This sweet and lasting

Overview

A story of friendship that can inspire anyone, even robots, to dream . . .

When Little Bot is thrown out with the garbage, he finds himself in a strange new world. Fortunately, Sparrow is there to take him under her wing. Together, they explore the forest, share adventures, and learn what it means to be forever friends.

This sweet and lasting tale by Jake Parker beautifully captures the happiness and love that can come from making your first true friend—and the courage it takes when it’s time to say goodbye.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 06/13/2016
“One day Little Bot wasn’t needed anymore. He was thrown out with the garbage.” That’s all Parker (The Little Snowplow) has to say about his droid’s backstory as he shows Little Bot tumbling through the air and landing unceremoniously on Earth, suggesting extraterrestrial origins. A bird named Sparrow spots the robot, whose face is an oversize monitor with doll-like features, and decides he “needed to be taken under her wing”; she schools him in the joys and pitfalls of life on Earth (Little Bot learns the hard way that “robots shouldn’t fly”). Parker chronicles the relationship between quirky master and student with velvety textures and idyllic settings that make the incongruous robot even more adorable. Then winter comes and Sparrow must leave. Little Bot doesn’t try to stop her or extract any promises of returning or lasting friendship; their time together has been enough. It’s a moment of profundity and emotional ambiguity that may surprise and even sadden readers, but the discussions this story will spark should prove as rewarding as the happiest of endings. Ages 3–6. Agent: Judith Hansen, Hansen Literary. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

“Parker’s gorgeous art captures the beauty of spring and the melancholy of winter, and he’s able to evoke a wealth of feeling in his miniature subjects . . . Readers might be reminded of Charlotte’s Web.” —USA Today

“Parker tells his story with humor and tenderness . . . Dreaming keeps memories alive for a very special robot in this sweet, quiet tale.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Parker chronicles the relationship between quirky master and student with velvety textures and idyllic settings that make the incongruous robot even more adorable . . . The discussions this story will spark should prove as rewarding as the happiest of endings.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A gently thoughtful picture book that got me just a little choked up . . . Parker's illustrations are absolutely gorgeous, with a soft edge that echoes the story.” —Books 4 Your Kids Blog

“A sweet, sweet story of friendship and dreams, and the powerful connection between the two . . . The spare but lovely narrative [is] made all the more sweet by Parker's adorable illustrations.” —Happily Ever Elephants

School Library Journal
10/01/2016
PreS-Gr 2—When a motherly Sparrow sees a discarded Robot, a friendship begins. In the spring, Sparrow teaches Robot how to have fun outside. In the summer, she shows him how to be curious (but safe). And before she has to fly south in the fall, she teaches him how to live without her. The warm illustrations capture the beauty of the changing seasons, during the day and the night, and the power of friendship. At the end of the tale, Robot is seen doing two things he thought impossible—dreaming and flying—all made possible because of Sparrow. The differences between a metallic robot and a feathery sparrow show friendships can happen between any two individuals. VERDICT A sweet additional purchase for friendship storytimes.—Tanya Boudreau, Cold Lake Public Library, Alta., Canada
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2016-06-01
A mechanical-avian friendship is an endearing one.When a robot is tossed into the garbage, he finds himself in a strange new environment in the outside world. Birds perch on him, and Little Bot greets them. Never having been greeted by a robot before, the birds fly off, except for one named Sparrow. She is observant and sees that Little Bot needs help figuring out nature, plants, and animals. And a good guide she is, warning him to avoid bees that sting and bears that are big. Little Bot is also a good observer and learner. When he asks his bird friend about sleeping and dreaming, Little Bot decides that dreams are "best left for the birds." Unfortunately for their friendship, the seasons are changing and winter is coming; Sparrow will fly away and leave Little Bot alone. He is pensive, but he has learned how to do something new to him that is wonderful and that will delight readers. Parker tells his story with humor and tenderness, while his digital illustrations warmly portray a small mechanical object and even smaller bird in the forest. The contrast in size between Little Bot and his new world is never scary but rather dreamy and poetic. Softly hued colors follow seasonal changes beautifully. Dreaming keeps memories alive for a very special robot in this sweet, quiet tale. (Picture book. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781626723672
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
09/27/2016
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
127,863
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Jake Parker is an illustrator and cartoonist whose picture books include The Girl Who Wouldn't Brush Her Hair, The Tooth Fairy Wars, The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man, and the #1 New York Times bestseller The Little Snowplow. He also created the Missile Mouse graphic novels, published by Scholastic. He lives in Utah with his wife and their five children.

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Little Bot and Sparrow 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MissPrint 10 months ago
When Little Bot is thrown out with the trash, he discovers a strange new world ready to explore. Sparrow soon takes Little Bot under her wing and teaches him important lessons including why robots should not fly. When the snow begins to fall, both Little Bot and Sparrow know that it's time for Sparrow to move on with the other birds. But even when Sparrow is gone Little Bot knows he has found his first friend. Thanks to Sparrow, Little Bot also has his first dream in Little Bot and Sparrow (2016) by Jake Parker. Everything about this book is thoughtfully assembled from the case covers (featuring schematic sketches of Bot and Sparrow) to the endpapers and the story itself. Parker's artwork is subtle and finely detailed while also being quite evocative of the mood. Whimsical, full-color illustrations and finely detailed backgrounds help to ground Little Bot and Sparrow, both sweetly drawn, in their surroundings. The text hits the perfect balance length-wise for younger readers. This picture book would be great to include in a themed story time for unlikely friends or robots (or both!). Little Bot and Sparrow is a charming story about discovering the big world and making friends complete with an open-ended and hopeful finish that hints at things to come for Little Bot. Possible Pairings: Little Eliot, Big City by Mike Curato; Clink by Kelly DiPucchio, illustrated by Matthew Myers; Boy + Bot by Ame Dyckman, illustrated by Dan Yaccarino