Little Clearing in the Woods: (Little House Series: The Caroline Years)

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Overview

Meet Caroline Quiner, the little girl who would grow up to be Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother. Caroline and her family are leaving the little town of Brookfield and moving to a new house in a clearing among the big trees of Concord, Wisconsin. As the Quiners travel through the dense forest, Caroline is excited, but she is also a little bit afraid. Will she like her new home in Concord as much as her little house in Brookfield?

Little Clearing in the Woods is the third book in The ...

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Overview

Meet Caroline Quiner, the little girl who would grow up to be Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother. Caroline and her family are leaving the little town of Brookfield and moving to a new house in a clearing among the big trees of Concord, Wisconsin. As the Quiners travel through the dense forest, Caroline is excited, but she is also a little bit afraid. Will she like her new home in Concord as much as her little house in Brookfield?

Little Clearing in the Woods is the third book in The Caroline Years, an ongoing series about another spirited girl from America's most beloved pioneer family.Caroline and her family must pack up their belongings and say good-bye to all their friends. They are leaving the little town of Brookfield and moving to a new house in the clearing among the big trees of Concord, Wisconsin. As the Quiners travel through the forest towards their new cabin, Caroline is excited, but she is also a little afraid. Will she love her new home in Concord as much as her little house in Brookfield? The adventures of the little girl who would grow up to be Ma Ingalls in the Little House books continue.

Young Caroline Quiner, who would grow up to be Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother, and her family move to a new farm near Concord, Wisconsin.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Gisela Jernigan
This third novel in the growing Little House series, "The Caroline Years," continues the story of Caroline Quiner, (Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother), as her family moves away from their home in Brookfield, Wisconsin, to a new home in a northwoods clearing. Caroline's 8th year is filled with work, challenges and fun, and as usual, the author does a good job of describing everyday and special pioneer activities, such as: a tin peddler's visit, building a pole barn and trying to salvage ruined vegetables. Black and white drawings, a Little House Family Tree and an author's note are inc1uded.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-As Little Town at the Crossroads ended, Caroline Quiner (Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother) and her family were facing a move to a new home in Concord, WI. Here, they set off for the small cabin in the woods that is barely habitable. With help from an uncle and neighbors, they fix up their new home and begin to clear the land. The undertaking is difficult, but Caroline's mother is strong and resourceful. Unfortunately, weeks of summer drought are followed by a severe rainstorm that ruins their crops. The widowed Mrs. Quiner is employed by the neighborhood rich man to provide meals for his laborers. The work is tedious and often unacknowledged, but all of the children help out. One of the workers is very kind, though, and as the story ends, he has proposed marriage to Mrs. Quiner. Fans of the two previous titles will enjoy reading about this year in her life. The tone is gentle and the scenes of pioneering hardship are balanced by scenes of good times. Through it all, the family maintains its closeness and resilience.-Susan Pine, New York Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
The family of Laura Ingalls Wilder is marketed practically to death with the appearance of another entry in the Little House/The Caroline Years series: Caroline, Laura's mother, is a child moving with her family to the Wisconsin woods. Wilkes is less concerned with characterization than in getting the family from one place to another, and settled in their new home. A description of their disastrous first crop is quickly followed by a solution to their threat of hunger. Hints of the characters' qualities peek through, as when Caroline wonders if "some new person" is "stuck inside" her increasingly fastidious sister. A flash of an argument between them brings the book temporarily to life, but it quickly settles back into a carefully planned script, charting a path from the move until the courtship of Caroline's mother, a widow. It's a genial volume, but can't hold a candle to Wilder's vividly evoked pioneer days, nor even to Roger Lea MacBride's Little House episodes about Rose Wilder (Little Farm in the Ozarks, 1994, etc.). (Fiction. 8-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060269975
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/1/1998
  • Series: Little House Series
  • Pages: 315
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.93 (w) x 8.45 (h) x 1.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Maria D. Wilkes first read the Little House books as a young girl and has been fascinated by pioneer history ever since. She did extensive research on the Quiner, Ingalls, and Wilder families, studied original sources and family letters and diaries, and worked in close consultation with several historians and the Laura Ingalls Wilder estate as she wrote the Caroline Years books. She lives in New Jersey with her husband, Peter, and her daughters, Grace and Natalie.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Good-byes

I forgot to tell Henry to take my chickens!" Caroline exclaimed. Waiting to climb into Uncle Elisha's wagon with her sisters, Martha and Eliza, she suddenly remembered her hens and whirled around to look for her brother.

"Leave Henry alone," Martha said in her most grown-up ten-year-old voice. "He's busy helping Joseph. And Charlie." Smiling happily, she tied her bonnet stringsrigs. beneath her chin and glanced quickly at the dark-haired boy helping her brothers. "Just think, we'll have two whole weeks with Charlie!" she whispered gleefully.

"I know they're busy," Caroline answered. Looking past Uncle Elisha and the team of oxen he was hitching to his wagon, she watched the flurry of activity taking place in front of the frame house. Her brothers, Joseph and Henry, and their neighbors, Benjamin Carpenter and his son, Charlie, were loading the Quiners' belongings into Mr. Carpenter's wagon. "But what if Henry forget s the hens?" Caroline asked.

"Mother told us to wait by Uncle Elisha's wagon until she comes outside," six-year-old Eliza said primly. Tucking her corncob doll inside her woolen shawl, she added, "She saidnot to bother the boys and Mr. Carpenter, or else.

Ignoring her little sister, Caroline set her schoolbooks and her rag doll, Abigail, beside a wagon wheel, then dashed the short distance across the cold, dewy grass grass to Mr. Carpenter's wagon. "Henry," she cried out breathlessly, "don't forget the hens!"

"Every one of them squawkers is packed already," Henry called out as he swung a hayfilledmattress over the side of Mr. Carpenter's wagon into his older brother's waiting arms. "In case you're wondering, Caroline, I brought the rooster along, too. Any empty space left up there, Joseph?"

Joseph surveyed the sacks, barrels, tables, and trunks piled in front of him. Two reed hampers, tightly packed with clothes, were tucked between Mother's butter churn and the three large barrels that held salt pork, flour, and corn meal. A washtub rested in the center of the wagon, cradling a collection of iron kettles and the leftover beans, peas, and potatoes from last fall's harvest. Beside the tub, four wooden chairs rested upside down on top of a square oak table. "A corner here," Joseph told Henry. "And there's some room on top of these chairs, too. What's left?"

"One crate and a small sack of flour," Henry answered, wiping his sweaty forehead with the back of his arm. "And the stove, of course."

"You didn't pile anything on the hens, did you?" Caroline asked, as she stepped up beside Henry and peered inside the wagon. "They won't like it one bit."

"If you think I want to find a gunny sack full of dead chickens when we get to Concord, you're mighty mistaken, little Brownbraid," Henry said,, rolling his eyes. "Those chickens will be the only food, we'll have to eat for weeks!"

"Don't say that!" Caroline cried. Ever since she was four years old, she had cared for the family's hens, collecting their eggs each morning, feeding them, and, cleaning out their henhouse. Each year shehad even named every one of the birds, and although she knew they weren't pets, she still hated to think about eating them. "And don't call me little Brownbraid, Henry! I'm not little, anymore.

"Eight years old doesn't make you a grown-up," Henry teased. "You have to waittill you're twelve, like. me! Now get back to Uncle Elisha's wagon, Caroline. We're 'bout ready, to go." With a teasing tug at the bottom of his sister's long brown, braid, Henry dashed back into the frame house.

"If I was a grown-up, I'd never go away." Caroline sighed as, she trudged back toward the wagon.

Six months ago, in the midst of the fall harvest, the Quiners had learned they'd have, to leave their home in Brookfield, Wisconsin. The man who owned their homestead had given it to his sister, and Mother needed to find a new place to live. A shiver darted through Caroline as she recalled Mother's reading the awful letter from Michael Woods that told them they'd have to move. It still didn't make sense to her that the little frame house she had lived in all her life could be his, when her father had built it, board by board.

In the first cold days of February, Mother and Uncle Elisha had traveled thirty miles west across a barren, frozen landscape to a little town named Concord. There Mother had purchased forty acres of land. Once the sweet sap began flowing from the maples, Mother had stopped the sewing and mending that kept her busy in the evenings and begun packing the family's belongings. Three weeks later, Uncle Elisha had arrived from Milwaukee in his empty wagon. Friends and neighbors in Brookfield had visited the frame house to say good-bye. Last night, Caroline had said her saddest farewell to her best friend, Anna.

A brisk April wind blew through Caroline's coat and brown woolen dress. She looked one more time past the garden and barn to the farthest corners of their land, where the palegreen marshes were spotted with yellow blossoms. Caroline was tempted to gather one last bouquet of the marsh marigolds, but she knew there wasn't time. So she checked off in her mind each of the favorite places she had visited: the barn, the henhouse, the garden, the old oak tree that tapped her bedroom window as she fell asleep on windy nights. Earlier this morning, Caroline had been in such a hurry, she'd hardly had a moment to, feel sad when she said good-bye to each of these places... Little Clearing in the Woods. Copyright © by Maria Wilkes. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2008

    A Loving Series

    In this book, Caroline and her family have to leave Brookfield and move to the growing town of Concord. They all come together and make their little cabin a warm cozy home. That's why I love this book. It is truely a really good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2002

    I loved this book-just one thing

    I loved this book,but when I was reading the last pages about Mr.Holbrook who wanted to marry their mother,I wanted to find out what happened.I ordered On top of concord hill at the Borders bookshop in Pasadena like three weeks ago and they promised 10 days but it hasn't come!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2002

    like anyother Caroline book you will enjoy this!

    Caroline and her family are forsed to move from their beloved home in Brookfeild to a rough old log cabin three miles from a small town called Concord. As the Quiner Family struggle to start their farm again they encouter new things to try that some are fun and some arnt. When their crop is washed away from a storm Carline and her family have to take a job so they can survive. Their job is to feed a group of rough unmannered men. And threw all this Carline recives a big suprise.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2002

    One of the best

    This book is so much like the other books in the Caroline Years.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2000

    The Caroline Years

    This book was cool.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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