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Little Criminals [NOOK Book]

Overview

From the author of The Midnight Choir.

Justin and Angela Kennedy are doing fine. Better than fine-they have wealth, position, love, children, and a limitless future. Into their lives comes Frankie Crowe, an ambitious criminal tired of risking his life for small change. Together with a crew of singularly dangerous men, Frankie decides that a kidnapping could be the first step toward a better life. Set in ...

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Little Criminals

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Overview

From the author of The Midnight Choir.

Justin and Angela Kennedy are doing fine. Better than fine-they have wealth, position, love, children, and a limitless future. Into their lives comes Frankie Crowe, an ambitious criminal tired of risking his life for small change. Together with a crew of singularly dangerous men, Frankie decides that a kidnapping could be the first step toward a better life. Set in modern Dublin, Little Criminals is a story that bristles with tension and expectation, a story about what happens to the fragile things-friendship, love, compassion-when all rules are broken.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The bumbling criminals in Irish journalist Kerrigan's second novel to be made available in the U.S. (after The Midnight Choir) will remind readers of the hapless losers who populate some of Elmore Leonard's books.A Smalltime Irish hoodlum Frankie Crowe plans to kidnap Justin Kennedy, a wealthy, up-and-coming Dublin entrepreneur.A But when Crowe finds out his intended victim is less flush than he'd believed, Crowe and his cohorts decide instead to abduct Kennedy's wife, Angela.A The bulk of the book centers on the attempts of Crowe's crew to collect Angela's ransom and the efforts to foil them led by Crowe's bête noir, Det. Insp. John Grace. The framing device-the recollections of an older man who's plotting revenge against Crowe for his role in an armed robbery of a pub-proves more interesting than the main action.A The author's fine ear for dialogue helps compensate for a less than compelling plot. (May)A

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Kirkus Reviews
A character-driven police procedural with an Irish twist. Originally published in the United Kingdom in 2005, before Kerrigan's American novelistic debut (The Midnight Choir, 2007), this work by the Dublin-based journalist shows his keen insight into the myriad varieties of human nature. Frankie Crowe is a career criminal who knows that it's just a matter of time until he's caught (he has been, he has served time and he's prepared to do it again), but he can't stop scheming to plot the big score that will have him "playing in a different league." To do so, he must try to enlist at least lip-service support from Dublin crime boss Jo-Jo Mackendrick, who has been Frankie's benefactor and whose life is the sort that Frankie envies. After a tip inspires a pub robbery that goes laughably awry, showing that the hotheaded Frankie lacks the cold calculation of a master criminal, he decides that a kidnapping will more than compensate for the pot of gold the pub failed to deliver. He recruits a band of accomplices who have previously dabbled with him in petty crime, some of whom have since gone straight and have various degrees of enthusiasm for the scheme and confidence in Frankie. The target: a well-to-do family who aren't what Frankie thinks they are, and who keep secrets from each other. The question then becomes how much Frankie can extort from Justin Kennedy, whose home the kidnappers invade, for the release of his wife, Angela. There are some provocative parallels between the work Justin does and Frankie's life of crime, and the novel reveals a particular empathy for Angela, who tries to trust at least one of her kidnappers and is never quite sure that she can trust her husband. The novelalso spends plenty of time inside the mind of Inspector John Grace, whose previous familiarity with Frankie might help jump-start a stalled career. The cops are no more pure than the criminals are purely corrupt, in a novel awash with moral ambiguity.
The Barnes & Noble Review
Kerrigan's prose is luxury stuff, said The New Yorker when The Midnight Choir came out last. This novel, published in the U.S. by Europa, the champion of new crime fiction from across the pond, is certainly all that. It's also a scathing look at the moral values of the New Ireland, the so-called "Celtic Tiger" whose economy is widening the gap between rich and poor in ways that the country's shameless former British landowners couldn't imagine. Frankie Crowe heads a largely inept gang of "little criminals" who try to steal, shoot, and bludgeon their way into the good life. Crowe has ambition in plenty, but he's also a bit of a nut case, and not even his sensible older cohort Martin Paxton can keep him from screwing up. Case in point: a kidnap scheme goes wildly wrong when Crowe and his boys grab the wrong man -- a lawyer who isn't doing badly but who has no way of raising the two million quid Frankie is asking for. Everything goes downhill from there, except for Kerrigan's beautiful writing, as clear and pure as spring water. "The shooting came at the end of a period -- more than a year -- in which a lot of things didn't quite work out," he tells us after a pub holdup fails because of faulty intelligence. "By now, Frankie Crowe and Martin Paxton were supposed to be on their way somewhere. Instead, they were here in a small town in County Meath, still scrounging for the rent." --Dick Adler
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781609451691
  • Publisher: Europa
  • Publication date: 3/20/2013
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 581,866
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Gene Kerrigan is a Dublin writer. He is the author of Another Country, This Great Little Nation (with Pat Brennan), Never Make a Promise You Can't Break: How to Succeed in Irish Politics, and the novel Little Criminals.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2014

    Engrossing Irish crime story

    this book is an engrossing story of a kidnapping in Dublin. It's told from the point of view of the criminals, the victim, her husband and the cops. All the characters are interesting. The story starts out slow and builds to an exciting climax.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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