Little Earthquakes

( 242 )

Overview

Jennifer Weiner's richest, wittiest, most true-to-life novel yet tells the story of three very different women as they navigate one of life's most wonderful and perilous transitions: the journay of new motherhood.
Becky is a plump, sexy chef who has a wonderfull husband and baby girl, a restaurant that received a citywide acclaim — and the mother-in-law from hell. Kelly is an event planner who's struggling to balance her work and motherhood while dealing with unemployed husband ...

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Little Earthquakes: A Novel

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Overview

Jennifer Weiner's richest, wittiest, most true-to-life novel yet tells the story of three very different women as they navigate one of life's most wonderful and perilous transitions: the journay of new motherhood.
Becky is a plump, sexy chef who has a wonderfull husband and baby girl, a restaurant that received a citywide acclaim — and the mother-in-law from hell. Kelly is an event planner who's struggling to balance her work and motherhood while dealing with unemployed husband who seems content to channel-surf for eight hours a day. Ayinde's basketball superstar husband breaks her trust at her most vulnerable moment, putting their new family even more in the public eye. Then, there's Lia, a Philadelphia native who has left her Hollywood career behind, along with her husband, and a tragic secret to start her life all over again.
From prenatal yoga to postbirth sex, Little Earthquakes is a frank, funny, fiercely perceptive take on the comedies and tragedies of love and marriage.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Three Philadelphia women meet at a pregnancy yoga class. Each has a problem: Becky is strapped with an overbearing, disapproving mother-in-law; Ayinde learns that her basketball star husband is guilty of adultery; and Kelly must cope with her corporate husband's job crisis. Added to this fictional stew is the plight of actress Lia, who has returned home to Philly in the wake of her infant baby's death.
From the Publisher
"Hilarious, heartbreaking and insightful."
Miami Herald

"Immensely readable.... Weiner's gift lies in her ability to create characters who both amuse us and make us care."
The Washington Post

"Weiner, a wonderful natural writer and storyteller, renders her characters and their...lives in details that resonate as the real deal."
Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Lively, witty, and often touching.... Weiner's snappy dialogue and captivating characters make Little Earthquakes endlessly appealing."
People

Deborah Sussman Susser
And yet after I'd finished Little Earthquakes, I found myself missing the characters. Theirs is a world where young mothers invite strange women in distress into their homes, serve them tea and sympathy and tell them, in essence, "You go, girlfriend." It may not be realistic as literary worlds go, but it is reassuring in its warmth and predictability. And judging by the success of chick lit generally and Weiner's books specifically, a lot of us out there are willing -- even eager -- to suspend our disbelief long enough to enter it.
— The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Novels that shift among multiple points of view, such as this one, are often read by multiple narrators, or at least one very skilled actor. Weiner is, unfortunately, no actor, and her reading, while serviceable, doesn't do the book justice. Though her voice is pleasantly pitched, she largely eschews character voices, which is a shame since her four primary characters-sensible, sarcastic Rebecca Rothstein Rabinowitz; Uber-organized Kelly Day; beautiful but lonely Ayinde Towne; and brokenhearted actress Lia Frederick-are so distinctly different. The story focuses on the tremors, both big and small, that shake up each woman's life. Rebecca, the quartet's down-to-earth center, has more trouble managing her demanding, self-absorbed mother-in-law than her newborn, but meeting Lia, who's recently lost her infant son, puts things into perspective for her. Ayinde, meanwhile, must deal with her cheating pro-basketball player husband, and Kelly is forced to come to terms with the fact that the reality of being married and having a baby is much harder than she ever dreamed. This is a poignant, thoughtful look at marriage and new motherhood, but it would have been better served by a more skilled narrator. Simultaneous release with the Atria hardcover (Forecasts, Sept. 13). (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Four young women who seem to have little in common get to know each other in the late stages of first pregnancy and childbirth. At a time when each thinks she should be happy and fulfilled, there is the overpowering sense of fragile weariness that comes with a new baby. One of the women is married to a basketball star who shows up in the delivery room smelling of another woman's perfume; another has a steady, ambitious husband who loses his job and becomes a long-term couch potato. In the development of the individual stories, understanding, forgiveness, and maturity begin to emerge. The voices of the women drive the narrative, and the author, who also reads the story, gives each person a distinct and appealing personality. Female listeners will relate to the universality of the friendship and warmth among these characters; recommended for all popular listening collections.-Barbara Valle, El Paso P.L., TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Weiner (Good in Bed, 2001; In Her Shoes, 2002) follows four Philadelphia women as they face the challenges, from trivial to profound, of new motherhood, becoming friends in the process. Becky, Kelly, and Ayinde meet at a pregnancy yoga class. At the same time, Lia, an actress who has returned home to Philly to come to grips with her baby's death, begins following Becky around and leaving her baby gifts (Weiner overlooks the stalker-creepiness of this behavior) until she joins the friendship circle as a kind of emotional counterweight to keep the others' problems in perspective. In Weiner's symmetry, each woman starts out with an issue and each faces a challenge. Lia's challenge is obviously her loss; her underlying issue is her mother's emotional coldness. Becky's issue is weight. A restaurant owner married to a nice Jewish doctor, Becky's challenge is her obnoxious, overbearing mother-in-law. Overachieving Kelly's issue is the poverty she has overcome. An event planner who has orchestrated her life for maximum security, Kelly is thrown a curve when her husband gets laid off from his corporate job and becomes a couch potato. For Ayinde, beautiful and from a privileged background as the daughter of an actor and a model, being biracial has been a lifelong struggle. Now her basketball star husband is slapped with a paternity suit by another woman. But love conquers all. Becky's husband miraculously grows a spine and quits being a mama's boy. Kelly and her husband learn to communicate and support each other in following their real professional dreams. Ayinde's husband proves he is a devoted father, and his former paramour visits Ayinde to assure her how much he really loves Ayinde. Lia findspeace with her loss, realizes that her mother has always loved her, and reunites with her husband. After her realistic examination of new motherhood and marital strain, Weiner pulls her punches with a too-neat ending. Film rights optioned to Universal Pictures for Stacey Sher and Michael Shamberg at Double Feature; author tour. Film agent: Jake Weiner/BenderSpink; literary agent: Joanna Pulcini
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743470100
  • Publisher: Washington Square Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 122,921
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer Weiner

Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eleven books, which have spent a combined five years on the bestseller list, with over 15 million copies in print in thirty-six countries. Her iconic debut Good in Bed is now in its fifty-ninth printing. In Her Shoes was turned into a major motion picture starring Cameron Diaz, Toni Collette, and Shirley MacLaine. Her newest novel, All Fall Down, has become one of the best-reviewed novels of the year, hailed as “compulsively readable” by The New York Times Book Review. A graduate of Princeton University, she lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com.

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    1. Hometown:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 28, 1970
    2. Place of Birth:
      De Ridder, Louisiana
    1. Education:
      B.A., Princeton University, 1991
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One: Lia

I watched her for three days, sitting by myself in the park underneath an elm tree, beside an empty fountain with a series of uneaten sandwiches in my lap and my purse at my side.

Purse. It's not a purse, really. Before, I had purses -- a fake Prada bag, a real Chanel baguette Sam had bought me for my birthday. What I have now is a gigantic, pink, floral-printed Vera Bradley bag big enough to hold a human head. If this bag were a person, it would be somebody's dowdy, gray-haired great-aunt, smelling of mothballs and butterscotch candies and insisting on pinching your cheeks. It's horrific. But nobody notices it any more than they notice me.

Once upon a time, I might have taken steps to assure that I'd be invisible: a pulled-down baseball cap or a hooded sweatshirt to help me dodge the questions that always began Hey, aren't you? and always ended with a name that wasn't mine. No, wait, don't tell me. Didn't I see you in something? Don't I know who you are?

Now, nobody stares, and nobody asks, and nobody spares me so much as a second glance. I might as well be a piece of furniture. Last week a squirrel ran over my foot.

But that's okay. That's good. I'm not here to be seen; I'm here to watch. Usually it's three o'clock or so when she shows up. I set aside my sandwich and hold the bag tightly against me like a pillow or a pet, and I stare. At first I couldn't really tell anything, but yesterday she stopped halfway past my fountain and stretched with her hands pressing the small of her back. I did that, I thought, feeling my throat close. I did that, too.

I used to love this park. Growing up in Northeast Philadelphia, my father would take me into town three times each year. We'd go to the zoo in the summer, to the flower show each spring, and to Wanamaker's for the Christmas light show in December. He'd buy me a treat -- a hot chocolate, a strawberry ice cream cone -- and we'd sit on a bench, and my father would make up stories about the people walking by. A teenager with a backpack was a rock star in disguise; a blue-haired lady in an ankle-length fur coat was carrying secrets for the Russians. When I was on the plane, somewhere over Virginia, I thought about this park, and the taste of strawberries and chocolate, and my father's arm around me. I thought I'd feel safe here. I was wrong. Every time I blinked, every time I breathed, I could feel the ground beneath me wobble and slide sideways. I could feel things starting to break.

It had been this way since it happened. Nothing could make me feel safe. Not my husband, Sam, holding me, not the sad-eyed, sweet-voiced therapist he'd found, the one who'd told me, "Nothing but time will really help, and you just have to get through one day at a time."

That's what we'd been doing. Getting through the days. Eating food without tasting it, throwing out the Styrofoam containers. Brushing our teeth and making the bed. On a Wednesday afternoon, three weeks after it happened, Sam had suggested a movie. He'd laid out clothes for me to wear -- lime-green linen capris that I still couldn't quite zip, an ivory silk blouse with pink-ribbon embroidery, a pair of pink slides. When I'd picked up the diaper bag by the door, Sam had looked at me strangely, but he hadn't said anything. I'd been carrying it instead of a purse before, and I'd kept right on carrying it after, like a teddy bear or a well-loved blanket, like something I loved that I couldn't bring myself to let go.

I was fine getting into the car. Fine as we pulled into the parking garage and Sam held the door for me and walked me into the red-velvet lobby that smelled like popcorn and fake butter....

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Introduction

Questions and Topics for Discussion

1) All four of the women who star in Little Earthquakes have complicated relationships with their mothers or mothers-in law. Think about how these relationships affect them and the bonds they develop with their babies. For instance, how do Ayinde's childhood memories and the current dynamics between her and her mother affect the relationship she develops with Julian? Ayinde clearly wants to raise her child differently than her parents raised her, but she also shows she wants to live up to her mother's expectations by taking Baby Success! seriously. How do you think this blend of motivations will affect Julian?

2) In Little Earthquakes, Ayinde, Kelly, and Becky each take a different approach to raising their baby. Ayinde tries Baby Success!; Kelly starts with a type A approach, keeping track of every little detail on spreadsheets and making sure Oliver has the perfect clothes and toys; and Becky goes for a more laid back, all-natural strategy. How do their approaches work out for them? Does any one approach seem to work out better than the others?

3) In the midst of their personal troubles, Becky's friends sometimes have a hard time remembering the ways in which they are fortunate. Kelly, in particular, tends to be scornful when people call her "lucky." But towards the end of the novel, Becky says, "If there was one lesson she'd learned from new motherhood, and from her friends, it was that any bit of good fortune had to be counted as lucky?and that there was always, always someone worse off than you" (398). How does motherhood help put things in perspective for Becky? What does she learn from herfriends, and what can we learn by comparing the experiences of each of the four women?

4) Kelly puts a lot of pressure on herself and on Steven to maintain the kind of life she couldn't have growing up. The schedule she tries to maintain is difficult, but it's not that different from the "double shift" of work and chores that many women take on when they have kids. Still, as the article in Power magazine read, "if Kelly O'Hara Day, with her smarts and her savvy and her Ivy League degree, can't successfully integrate a career and a family, it doesn't suggest that things for other working mothers are much different — or that thirty some years after the feminists waged a so-called revolution, the workplace is likely to become a kinder, gentler place for the women who will follow in her footsteps" (441). Do you think Kelly mismanaged her life, or do you think the choices available to working women, are, as the reporter wrote, likely to put any woman in a tough spot? Can women today really have it all, or do they need to choose between having a family and having a career?

5) Both Ayinde and Kelly consider divorce at some point. When Ayinde considers leaving Richard, she thinks of the chapter on divorce in Baby Success!: "Marriage on the rocks? Keep your eyes on the prize. Remember what really matters. Remember who comes first?.Babies do better with mommy and daddy both under the same roof" (298-9). Is this good advice? Were you surprised that Ayinde patched things up with Richard? Do you think either Ayinde or Kelly should have followed through with a divorce?

6) When Lia flees to Philadelphia, she leaves her husband behind, even though they love each other very much. She says, "Every time he looked at me, he'd see what we had lost; every time I looked at him, I'd see the same thing. I couldn't stay. I couldn't stay and hurt him anymore" (5). Why does Lia assume that her presence is hurting her husband? Where does her sense of culpability and guilt come from, and how do they complicate her grief? Why does she finally reach out to Sam?

7) After Ayinde learns what's causing Julian's heart murmur, she thinks, "A hole in his heart. It was almost poetic. She'd been walking around for weeks feeling like someone had torn a hole in her own" (354). How does Julian's malady reflect the injury that Ayinde has sustained on an emotional level, and what do his prospects for health and well-being imply about hers and the well-being of her friends, who have each had their own struggles?

8) Kelly's mother, Paula, tries to convince her daughter that covetousness is a sin. She says, "You should be concerned with the state of your soul, not the state of your bank account" (48). Considering the kind of life Kelly had at home, it's not surprising that she doesn't take her mother's advice to heart. Should she have taken her more seriously? Why does Kelly strive so hard to find the perfect accessories? Is she truly covetous? Is she looking for security? Does she wish to appear affluent? Does she appreciate nice things aesthetically? Whatever her motivation is, do you think she will ever be satisfied by the acquisition of objects?

9) Like all of the other characters, Ayinde's life changes dramatically when she has Julian. However, unlike Becky and Kelly, she also finds that she can no longer continue her career, due to her new husband's celebrity. How does Ayinde's sense of self change after she marries and has her baby? Do you think she makes choices for Julian and for herself that she would not have made if she could work? How is her relationship with her husband and baby affected by her decision not to pursue her career?

10) Becky has struggled with body image throughout her life, but her pregnancy seems to draw her attention to her weight more than usual. She had hoped that pregnancy would allow her to relax a little, but instead she finds herself playing "pregnant or just fat?" How does this disappointment and Becky's struggle with body image affect her experience with pregnancy?

11) Similarly, the characters experience numerous aspects of pregnancy and childbirth that they didn't really expect, or with which they were disappointed. Together, they discuss things that surprised them like the unpleasant physical side affects of pregnancy and baby farts, and more serious unexpected problems like Lia's trouble getting Caleb to sleep. Why do you think the characters, many of whom read books like What to Expect When You're Expecting or took classes in childbirth and baby care, found themselves confused and surprised so often? How did their expectations of motherhood conflict with reality? Where do you think their expectations came from?

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

Questions and Topics for Discussion

1) All four of the women who star in Little Earthquakes have complicated relationships with their mothers or mothers-in law. Think about how these relationships affect them and the bonds they develop with their babies. For instance, how do Ayinde's childhood memories and the current dynamics between her and her mother affect the relationship she develops with Julian? Ayinde clearly wants to raise her child differently than her parents raised her, but she also shows she wants to live up to her mother's expectations by taking Baby Success! seriously. How do you think this blend of motivations will affect Julian?

2) In Little Earthquakes, Ayinde, Kelly, and Becky each take a different approach to raising their baby. Ayinde tries Baby Success!; Kelly starts with a type A approach, keeping track of every little detail on spreadsheets and making sure Oliver has the perfect clothes and toys; and Becky goes for a more laid back, all-natural strategy. How do their approaches work out for them? Does any one approach seem to work out better than the others?

3) In the midst of their personal troubles, Becky's friends sometimes have a hard time remembering the ways in which they are fortunate. Kelly, in particular, tends to be scornful when people call her "lucky." But towards the end of the novel, Becky says, "If there was one lesson she'd learned from new motherhood, and from her friends, it was that any bit of good fortune had to be counted as lucky—and that there was always, always someone worse off than you" (398). How does motherhood help put things in perspective for Becky? What does she learn from her friends, and what can we learn by comparing the experiences of each of the four women?

4) Kelly puts a lot of pressure on herself and on Steven to maintain the kind of life she couldn't have growing up. The schedule she tries to maintain is difficult, but it's not that different from the "double shift" of work and chores that many women take on when they have kids. Still, as the article in Power magazine read, "if Kelly O'Hara Day, with her smarts and her savvy and her Ivy League degree, can't successfully integrate a career and a family, it doesn't suggest that things for other working mothers are much different — or that thirty some years after the feminists waged a so-called revolution, the workplace is likely to become a kinder, gentler place for the women who will follow in her footsteps" (441). Do you think Kelly mismanaged her life, or do you think the choices available to working women, are, as the reporter wrote, likely to put any woman in a tough spot? Can women today really have it all, or do they need to choose between having a family and having a career?

5) Both Ayinde and Kelly consider divorce at some point. When Ayinde considers leaving Richard, she thinks of the chapter on divorce in Baby Success!: "Marriage on the rocks? Keep your eyes on the prize. Remember what really matters. Remember who comes first—.Babies do better with mommy and daddy both under the same roof" (298-9). Is this good advice? Were you surprised that Ayinde patched things up with Richard? Do you think either Ayinde or Kelly should have followed through with a divorce?

6) When Lia flees to Philadelphia, she leaves her husband behind, even though they love each other very much. She says, "Every time he looked at me, he'd see what we had lost; every time I looked at him, I'd see the same thing. I couldn't stay. I couldn't stay and hurt him anymore" (5). Why does Lia assume that her presence is hurting her husband? Where does her sense of culpability and guilt come from, and how do they complicate her grief? Why does she finally reach out to Sam?

7) After Ayinde learns what's causing Julian's heart murmur, she thinks, "A hole in his heart. It was almost poetic. She'd been walking around for weeks feeling like someone had torn a hole in her own" (354). How does Julian's malady reflect the injury that Ayinde has sustained on an emotional level, and what do his prospects for health and well-being imply about hers and the well-being of her friends, who have each had their own struggles?

8) Kelly's mother, Paula, tries to convince her daughter that covetousness is a sin. She says, "You should be concerned with the state of your soul, not the state of your bank account" (48). Considering the kind of life Kelly had at home, it's not surprising that she doesn't take her mother's advice to heart. Should she have taken her more seriously? Why does Kelly strive so hard to find the perfect accessories? Is she truly covetous? Is she looking for security? Does she wish to appear affluent? Does she appreciate nice things aesthetically? Whatever her motivation is, do you think she will ever be satisfied by the acquisition of objects?

9) Like all of the other characters, Ayinde's life changes dramatically when she has Julian. However, unlike Becky and Kelly, she also finds that she can no longer continue her career, due to her new husband's celebrity. How does Ayinde's sense of self change after she marries and has her baby? Do you think she makes choices for Julian and for herself that she would not have made if she could work? How is her relationship with her husband and baby affected by her decision not to pursue her career?

10) Becky has struggled with body image throughout her life, but her pregnancy seems to draw her attention to her weight more than usual. She had hoped that pregnancy would allow her to relax a little, but instead she finds herself playing "pregnant or just fat?" How does this disappointment and Becky's struggle with body image affect her experience with pregnancy?

11) Similarly, the characters experience numerous aspects of pregnancy and childbirth that they didn't really expect, or with which they were disappointed. Together, they discuss things that surprised them like the unpleasant physical side affects of pregnancy and baby farts, and more serious unexpected problems like Lia's trouble getting Caleb to sleep. Why do you think the characters, many of whom read books like What to Expect When You're Expecting or took classes in childbirth and baby care, found themselves confused and surprised so often? How did their expectations of motherhood conflict with reality? Where do you think their expectations came from?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 242 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(123)

4 Star

(69)

3 Star

(30)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 243 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Outstanding

    Lia thought she had it all with Sam, but tragedy has sent her fleeing Hollywood and him. Popular Chef Becky loves her husband Andrew, but detests her interfering nasty mother-in-law. Kelly works hard so that she and her spouse can live a better life than she did as a kid, but her husband Steve lost his job and seems not to care about anything even her. Reporter Ayinde is married to a basketball superstar Richard who she though was faithful to her, but now knows he is just like every other jock, using the wrong head to break his vows................................ Lia meets the other three women, who already are friends and pregnant. She joins their circle as she sees sisters with spousal troubles. Can this quartet provide the safety net and support that each one desperately needs at a critical time in their prospective lives?......................... LITTLE EARTHQUAKES is a strong insightful character study that runs along four subplots that rotate between the women, but intersects as each tries to be there for the others. The story line hooks family drama readers from the start as the tales seem real, touching, and somewhat amusing though serious. The key cast comes across as friends and neighbors helping one another cope. Jennifer Weiner furbishes a deep look at varying relationships, the good, the bad, and the ugly............................. Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    Love

    Have read more than twice. Love all of the characters and can relate to them all in different ways. Read before having a child and twice since my son was born, it's amazing how much you can see yourself a young mother in these characters!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2012

    Smashing!

    The interwoven lives of the characters kept me interested to the end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    Loved it!

    Read it, youll love it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2012

    Love it!

    Love it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2012

    Down to earth and real

    I read this book for a book club not thinking I would like it all that much. But the characters are so in depth and real that I found myself wanting to hear more about them. It's well written and a very real look at all kinds of motherhood.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    A great read

    An honest story of motherhood, friends and realtionships with the thin line of balancing it all. A nice quick read.

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  • Posted March 24, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent book!

    Great book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    Entertaining but predictable

    Fun, light, entertaining but predictable. Very unbelievable friendships though. We could only wish it was that easy to make such close friends. And a basketball wife without an entourage and help....please!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    Great!

    A very entertaining and emotional read, especially if you're a mom. I couldn't put it down and i felt like the characters were so real. Great book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    Amazing book by an amazing author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2011

    Really enjoyed it

    I like this author-not exactly a book that will make you think but it is a nice escape. And sometimes, that is just what you need.

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  • Posted October 9, 2011

    Fabulous

    It took me a while to get into this book but it is wonderful

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  • Posted September 10, 2011

    Decent

    Its a little slow to start, doesn't really get good until about the middle. Still worth reading. Good book overall.

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  • Posted September 6, 2011

    Good, if slightly predictable

    Love this author for times when i need a break from my mysteries or anything "heavy". The book is a well written story about the trials and tribulations of an unlikely group of friends who are new mothers. Probably a more engaging read for mothers of small children.

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  • Posted July 15, 2011

    Will make you laugh and cry!!!

    I love this book!

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  • Posted July 3, 2011

    Loved it!

    This was a really good book. I found myself not wanting to put it down, and wanted more even when I was done.

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  • Posted December 15, 2010

    Good Read

    The book wasn't at all what I expected; however, I couldn't put it down. I read this book after reading Good In Bed (my first read by Jennifer Weiner) and I liked that book a little more.

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  • Posted August 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great Read

    This is the first book I read from this author and it was a great one. This book chronicles the lives of four women and how becoming pregnant and having babies changed or challenged their marriages. This is a must read for any married couple contempting childhood.

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  • Posted May 17, 2010

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    I Also Recommend:

    Jennifer Weiner does it again!

    I think that this is Jennifer Weiner's best book yet. Her wittiness really shines as her story makes you laugh, cry and relive the joys and pains of parenthood.

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