Little Farmer Joe

Little Farmer Joe

by Ian Whybrow, Christian Birmingham
     
 

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When Joe stays with Aunt Bee and Uncle Will on their farm, he's more than a little afraid of all the different animals and the new and unfamiliar scene. "I'm not scared!" he asserts with all the bravado he can muster. Then, one moonlit night, Uncle Will needs his help to deliver a lamb, and Joe learns to overcome his fears. By the time Mom and Dad come to get him,

Overview


When Joe stays with Aunt Bee and Uncle Will on their farm, he's more than a little afraid of all the different animals and the new and unfamiliar scene. "I'm not scared!" he asserts with all the bravado he can muster. Then, one moonlit night, Uncle Will needs his help to deliver a lamb, and Joe learns to overcome his fears. By the time Mom and Dad come to get him, Joe is proud to show off his new baby lamb-and his newfound confidence! Children will identify and sympathize with Joe in this warm and tender portrayal of a small boy's first experience of spending time away from his parents.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
When little Joe arrives at his aunt and uncle's farm he tries his hardest to be brave, but it's all new to him and just a little scary. The first full day on the farm brings Joe face to face with all sorts of creatures that a city kid like him knows nothing about. All the while telling himself he's not afraid, Joe shies away from every farm animal he comes across. Late that night, Joe hears a commotion out in the barn and soon finds himself overcoming his fears in the least imaginable place. By the time Joe's parents arrive the next day, Little Farmer Joe has rightfully earned his new nickname and has taken charge of the barnyard. This tender tale is simply and sweetly told. Pastel chalk drawings fill the pages with farmyard scenes that are equally realistic and dream-like. 2001, Kingfisher, $16.95. Ages 3 to 6. Reviewer:Trina Heidt
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Everything is strange on his uncle and aunt's farm where Joe must stay for the weekend while his parents visit his grandmother in the hospital. The preschooler is understandably fearful, but he tries his best to be brave. The first day brings a barrage of new and scary situations: cows with big horns, a curious dog, noisy geese, muddy pigs, and a clumsy sheep that knocks him over. The plot moves gracefully into a realistic situation when Joe offers comfort to an animal more frightened than he: "`Don't be scared, sheep,' he whispered," and things begin to turn around for this child. In clear prose, Whybrow develops this simple story with insight, honesty, and warm humor. Birmingham's high-quality, chalk-pastel illustrations fill the large pages with color and detail. The pictures capture emotions well, helping children identify with Joe's situation. By story's end, his reassurance to his mother, nervous about feeding the new lamb, may bring a smile to an anxious child: "Don't be scared. Just reach out and talk to him-he won't hurt you." A sweet, gentle story to share with children on laps or in storytimes.-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780753455937
Publisher:
Kingfisher
Publication date:
03/20/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
1.11(w) x 1.11(h) x 1.11(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Christian Birmingham is an acknowledged star of children's book illustration. Christian collaborated with Ian Whybrow on Kingfisher's acclaimed A Baby for Grace. He has been nominated for the prestigious Mother Goose Award and has been described in Britan's Guardian newspaper as "a modern-day Degas."

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