Little Green (Easy Rawlins Series #11)

( 41 )

Overview

When Walter Mosley burst onto the literary scene in 1990 with his first Easy Rawlins mystery, Devil in a Blue Dress—a combustible mixture of Raymond Chandler and Richard Wright—he captured the attention of hundreds of thousands of readers (including future president Bill Clinton). Eleven books later, Easy Rawlins is one of the few private eyes in contemporary crime fiction who can be called iconic and immortal. In the incendiary and fast-paced Little Green, he returns from the brink of death to investigate the ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (56) from $1.99   
  • New (18) from $14.44   
  • Used (38) from $1.99   
Little Green (Easy Rawlins Series #11)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

When Walter Mosley burst onto the literary scene in 1990 with his first Easy Rawlins mystery, Devil in a Blue Dress—a combustible mixture of Raymond Chandler and Richard Wright—he captured the attention of hundreds of thousands of readers (including future president Bill Clinton). Eleven books later, Easy Rawlins is one of the few private eyes in contemporary crime fiction who can be called iconic and immortal. In the incendiary and fast-paced Little Green, he returns from the brink of death to investigate the dark side of L.A.’s 1960s hippie haven, the Sunset Strip.

We last saw Easy in 2007’s Blonde Faith, fighting for his life after his car plunges over a cliff. True to form, the tough WWII veteran survives, and soon his murderous sidekick Mouse has him back cruising the mean streets of L.A., in all their psychedelic 1967 glory, to look for a young black man, Evander “Little Green” Noon, who disappeared during an acid trip. Fueled by an elixir called Gator’s Blood, brewed by the conjure woman Mama Jo, Easy experiences a physical, spiritual, and emotional resurrection, but peace and love soon give way to murder and mayhem. Written with Mosley’s signature grit and panache, this engrossing and atmospheric mystery is not only a trip back in time, it is also a tough-minded exploration of good and evil, and of the power of guilt and redemption. Once again, Easy asserts his reign over the City of (Fallen) Angels.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Easy Rawlins was supposed to be dead. When last seen, he was rolling off a cliff in Blonde Faith, DUI and apparently headed for the morgue. Instead, he's Resurrection Rawlins, nursed back to health by the ministrations of "Mouse" and Mama Jo. His recovery mercifully sets up readers for some prime time urban sleuthing about a nonstop partier who vanishes into the darkness. A mystery writer so good that he transcends genre.

Publishers Weekly
In 2007’s Blonde Faith, set in 1967, Easy Rawlins drove drunkenly off a cliff in what his creator indicated was likely his last appearance. Now, after two months of sliding in and out of consciousness, Easy begins the long journey back to the living, in Mosley’s superb 12th mystery featuring his iconic sleuth. Saved by Ray “Mouse” Alexander and the ministrations of Mama Jo, Easy is asked by Mouse to find Evander “Little Green” Noon, who went clubbing on the Sunset Strip and disappeared. Weakened but determined to keep moving, Easy is buoyed by Mama Jo’s potent brew she calls “Gator’s Blood” and the support of numerous friends, including Martin Martins and Jackson Blue. Things are changing in L.A., and Easy finds hope in the hippie culture. In the course of his search for Little Green, Easy earns an astonished accolade from Blue, who says he never thought he’d see the day “when Raymond Alexander had to tell Easy Rawlins to hold back.” If there were an Edgar for best comeback player, Easy Rawlins would be a shoo-in. 8-city author tour. Agent: Gloria Loomis, Watkins Loomis Agency. (May)
From the Publisher

Advance Praise for LITTLE GREEN:

“In 2007’s Blonde Faith, set in 1967, Easy Rawlins drove drunkenly off a cliff in what his creator indicated was likely his last appearance. Now, after two months of sliding in and out of consciousness, Easy begins the long journey back to the living, in Mosley’s superb 12th mystery featuring his iconic sleuth…. If there were an Edgar for best comeback player, Easy Rawlins would be a shoo-in.”
Publishers Weekly (starred) 

"Mosley fans were pining for the resurrection of Rawlins.  Their dreams have come true.... Mosley returns here to doing what he does best: setting the pain and pleasure of individual lives, lived mostly in L.A.'s black community, within an instantly recognizable historical moment and allowing the two to feed off one another.... [A] major event for crime-fiction fans." 
—Bill Ott, Booklist

Library Journal
Evander “Little Green” Noon has gone missing, and Easy Rawlins is pulled into the mystery by sidekick Raymond “Mouse” Alexander. The African American PI, who knows the Los Angeles streets, is the go-to guy to find Evander, but a violent car accident leaves him incapacitated. Local shaman Mama Jo hands Easy a weird concoction called Gator’s Blood that provides miraculous strength. Easy then calls on his acute street smarts and embarks on his mission to find Evander. Following the 1967 Watts riots, the City of Angels is flush with hippies and racial tension, making it a challenge for Easy to get straight answers. He learns that finding a lost person is just the beginning of a complicated puzzle that will challenge his deep sense of loyalty.

Verdict Mosley’s latest addition to this series (after Blonde Faith) is a must-have for hard-boiled mystery fans as Easy and Mouse give the late Robert B. Parker’s Spenser and Hawk a run for their money. Street lit staples of betrayal, drug use, and abusive cops are part of this taut tale that rises above other mysteries through its strong African American protagonist. I want Easy Rawlins watching my back. [An eight-city tour.]—Rollie Welch, Cleveland P.L.
(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Reviews
The 1967 Watts riots seem to have slowed down time for Easy Rawlins, who returns only a few weeks after his apparent death at the end of Blonde Faith (2007). That climactic car crash didn't kill Easy, but it left him weak as a kitten and prone to disturbing dreams of past and future. Only repeated drafts of Gator's Blood, the home brew cooked up by healer Mama Jo, allow Easy to escape the ministrations of martinet nurse Antigone Fowler and take to the streets again. As usual, his mission is straightforward--to find Evander Noon, whose mother, Timbale, is a friend of Easy's dangerous best bud Mouse Alexander--but his path is winding. His information takes him to Lula Success' brothel, where Evander dallied before leaving in the company of Maurice Potter. Coco, a prostitute born Helen Ray, leads Easy to Evander, who's been kidnapped by three gangsters and tied to a tree, and the pair, acting swiftly, free Evander and bring him home to his mother. But the conflicts that made those thugs snatch Evander obviously haven't been resolved by his rescue. In order to protect the wayward young man, Easy will have to find the links between insurance giant Proxy Nine, oil company TexOk, and the likes of sneak thief Charles Rumor and all-around nasty operator Haman Rose. Mosley is much more interested in bringing these characters and the social forces they represent to life than in connecting the dots. The result works better as anthropology than mystery, with barely a teaspoon of plot to a monstrous deal of aphorism Whether it's the lingering effects of his near-fatal accident or the infusions of Gator's Blood, Easy sounds less like Watts' signature private eye than one of the visionaries from Mosley's Crosstown to Oblivion novellas (Stepping Stone/The Love Machine, 2013, etc.).
From the Publisher
“Mosley writes like a slumming angel, and his evocation of mid-century L.A. is worth savoring.” —The Detroit News

“Faster, smarter and more gutsy than any of its predecessors. . . .  Mosley writes mysteries, but they’re also literary jewels and priceless social history.” —The Globe and Mail (Canada)

“Mosley is never better than when he’s got a juicy cut of history to chew on, and the hippie counterculture of the late ’60s perfectly feeds his style.” —The New York Times Book Review
 
 “Mosley’s project, like James Ellroy’s, like Chester Himes’s, has always been to use the genre to explore history and racial politics. He’s a thinker and a polemicist and not just a mystery guy.” —Los Angeles Times

“Rawlins himself is at the heart of the series’ appeal: a well-read auto-didact and man of action, father of found children and spouse to no one who sometimes sees his double life, divided between the land of law and the underworld.” —The Wall Street Journal

“The Easy Rawlins novels. . . .  have never been mere whodunits. Taken together, they are nothing less than a history of race relations in post-World War II Los Angeles. Little Green more than lives up to the high standard the author has set.” —Associated Press

“The mix of hardboiled detective narrative and social philosophizing on African American life . . . [is what] makes Easy such an enduring figure and his comeback so welcome.” —The Houston Chronicle

“[A] major event for crime-fiction fans. . . . Mosley returns here to doing what he does best: setting the pain and pleasure of individual lives, lived mostly in L.A.’s black community, within an instantly recognizable historical moment and allowing the two to feed off one another.” —Booklist

“Superb. . . .  If there were an Edgar for best comeback player, Easy Rawlins would be a shoo-in.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

 “Rawlins, Mouse, and the world they live in have as many sharp, hard surfaces as ground obsidian. But Mosley gives them an additional facet. Whereas the traditional hard-boiled detective is a lonely, solitary figure, Rawlins is surrounded by a family of his own making, an adopted, makeshift, multi-ethnic family that reflects and prefigures the realities of modern America.” —Tulsa World

 “Mosley is a master of historical setting and atmosphere, and he does a dazzling job of capturing the 1960s vibe of the Strip, from the free-spirited innocence of the flower children to the sinister glint of those who prey upon them.” —Tampa Bay Times

“[In Easy,] Mosley has created a flesh-and-blood man who transcends the page and walks forever in our imaginations.” —Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“A powerful writer, with such well-honed prose and so strong a sense of place that his books are always entertaining.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Unraveling the puzzles . . . is almost as enjoyable as marveling at the author’s nimble mind, and discovering, yet again, that the prolific Mosley has many more tales to tell.” —The Boston Globe

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385535984
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/14/2013
  • Series: Easy Rawlins Series , #11
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 950,399
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

WALTER MOSLEY is the author of more than forty books, including eleven previous Easy Rawlins mysteries, the first of which, Devil in a Blue Dress, was made into an acclaimed film starring Denzel Washington. Always Outnumbered was an HBO film starring Laurence Fishburne, adapted from Mosley’s first Socrates Fortlow novel. A native of Los Angeles and a graduate of Goddard College, he holds an MFA from CCNY and lives in Brooklyn, New York. He is the winner of numerous awards, including an O. Henry Award, a Grammy, and PEN America’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Biography

When President Bill Clinton announced that Walter Mosley was one of his favorite writers, Black Betty (1994), Mosley's third detective novel featuring African American P.I. Easy Rawlins, soared up the bestseller lists. It's little wonder Clinton is a fan: Mosley's writing, an edgy, atmospheric blend of literary and pulp fiction, is like nobody else's. Some of his books are detective fiction, some are sci-fi, and all defy easy categorization.

Mosley was born in Los Angeles, traveled east to college, and found his way into writing fiction by way of working as a computer programmer, caterer, and potter. His first Easy Rawlins book, Gone Fishin' didn't find a publisher, but the next, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990) most certainly did -- and the world was introduced to a startlingly different P.I.

Part of the success of the Easy Rawlins series is Mosley's gift for character development. Easy, who stumbles into detective work after being laid off by the aircraft industry, ages in real time in the novels, marries, and experiences believable financial troubles and successes. In addition, Mosley's ability to evoke atmosphere -- the dangers and complexities of life in the toughest neighborhoods of Los Angeles -- truly shines. His treatment of historic detail (the Rawlins books take place in Los Angeles from the 1940s to the mid-1960s) is impeccable, his dialogue fine-tuned and dead-on.

In 2002, Mosley introduced a new series featuring Fearless Jones, an Army vet with a rigid moral compass, and his friend, a used-bookstore owner named Paris Minton. The series is set in the black neighborhoods of 1950s L.A. and captures the racial climate of the times. Mosley himself summed up the first book, 2002's Fearless Jones, as "comic noir with a fringe of social realism."

Despite the success of his bestselling crime series, Mosley is a writer who resolutely resists pigeonholing. He regularly pens literary fiction, short stories, essays, and sci-fi novels, and he has made bold forays into erotica, YA fiction, and political polemic. "I didn't start off being a mystery writer," he said in an interview with NPR. "There's many things that I am." Fans of this talented, genre-bending author could not agree more!

Good To Know

Mosley won a Grammy award in 2002 in the category of "Best Album Notes" for Richard Pryor.... And It's Deep, Too! The Complete Warner Bros. Recordings (1968-1992).

Mosley is an avid potter in his spare time.

In our 2004 interview, Mosley reveals:

"I was a computer programmer for 15 years before publishing my first book. I am an avid collector of comic books. And I believe that war is rarely the answer, especially not for its innocent victims."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 12, 1952
    2. Place of Birth:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Education:
      B.A., Johnson State College
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

1

I came half-awake, dead and dreaming. My eyes were open but I couldn’t focus on anything because I was still falling, as if the nightmare had followed me from sleep into the waking world. I didn’t know where I was or where I’d come from. But the bed under me was turning and falling and I, I was sure, had perished. This sensation was so real, so palpable that I closed my eyes and moaned. The movement of the bed then took on a temporal quality; instead of falling I had become unmoored in time: traveling backward and then forward through a life that was mine and yet, at the same time, foreign to me.

I watched my mother dying in the bedroom of our shanty house in New Iberia, Louisiana. She was laid up in a feather bed, a big woman who was trying to catch her breath but couldn’t inhale right. It sounded like she was drowning. She was so pretty, I thought. I had once loved her but could no longer raise this feeling in my heart. I might have even smiled as she shuddered under the labor of simple breathing.

Then I tumbled into a boxcar peopled by brooding and silent black men. They stared at the boy and he saw from their point of view a scared eight-year-old orphan child looking for companionship in those angry, bloodshot eyes. I was no longer that kid but had become those men who couldn’t care about another defenseless child orphaned and destined, probably, to die. I saw myself and wondered, almost idly, if that young son would live to the end of the line.

I was surprised to see that he had made it to Fifth Ward, Houston, Texas. Stealing oranges, skulking in back-alley corners, asking everyone he met if they knew a name—Martin. “My grandfather,” he said. He’d learned to speak up and stand straight. He already carried scars that would follow him through life but he found his grandfather: a hard man who allowed him to sleep on the outside front porch at night.

Time picked up speed after that. In an instant the boy, Ezekiel, was a young man, a fool who signed up for the army, for the war. He passed through North Africa, then Italy and France. He fought men and killed them out of reflex and fear. He liberated a concentration camp, a killer opening the gates for the dead and the dying and those left with the image of death permanently imprinted on their souls.

I was dying, no, had died.

Returning to Houston, the man, no longer weak or afraid, found that most of his friends in that part of town were deceased. Renfro had been slaughtered by a jealous woman named Theresa who in turn died from alcohol poisoning. Martin killed a white man and then shot himself in the burning shack where the boy had slept on the porch. Minna Rogers, Delphine Montesque, Michael Michaels, Big Boy Sanders, and dozens of others, all died while the boy-turned-man had survived the greatest war in history.

“Easy?”

There was a flood rising in the room that was swathed in darkness. My right ankle was shackled to the floor next to the bed, and the water was already up to my ears. I pulled against the chain but all that did was cause me pain. My ankle hurt like a motherfucker and the chain would not give. I tried to rise, hoping that I could float to the extent of the bond, that maybe I could keep my nose above water, but I knew somehow that my luck had run out, that Death had come in on me while I was distracted by the mountains of evil I had lived through. Just the fact that I could survive such terror made me guilty, and now he was coming up through the floorboards like he did for my mother.

Death. I had followed him through all the years of my life as he dropped bodies in my path as little reminders to me and others that the end of the road was no bed of roses, no kingdom come. It felt as if my whole life was an obstacle course, a slogging journey trying to catch up with Death, trying to get a good look at his face. . . .

“Easy.”

And then, up ahead, on my journey through a past life that no longer belonged to me, I saw his back; the Reaper was right there in front of me, carelessly firing a pistol into the night. I could reach out and touch his shoulder. When I did this he grunted and turned and I realized that I knew this being, this deadly force that had dogged me from the earliest moments of my life.

He was well dressed for any occasion or epoch. Smiling with a gold tooth that had a diamond embedded in it, he was a colored man, not black but light-skinned and light-eyed. A brother who had littered the road I traveled with so many dead that even he had lost count.

“Easy.”

His lips didn’t move but I recognized my name, my true name, not the one my dead father gave me. Raymond Alexander, known as Mouse to his victims and friends alike, smiled at me and I shivered in pleasure and fear.

“Ray,” I said, and his smile slowly diminished.

He stared at me and shook his head. I almost cried but then I remembered who I was and what I’d been through.

“No, man,” I said. “You can’t dismiss me like some schoolkid. You can’t turn your back on me after all these years.”

He smiled again, and even though I was dead I felt elation. This emotion was followed by the sense of falling again. There was a broad ocean rippling gently under a partial moon and the execution of a perfect accelerating arc of plummeting downward. A shackle was affixed painfully to my right ankle but, impossibly, Mouse was still standing there in front of me, his expression daring me to do something about the fix I was in.

“You expect me to fly, motherfucker?” I yelled.

Mouse laughed without sound and nodded at me.

“Easy, wake up.”

The command was feminine, a nuisance that somehow carried weight. The panorama of my hallucinatory journey called to me. I wanted to go off with Mouse, to follow the long line of dead black folks, soldiers, and Jews. I wanted to join the people I killed and the ones I couldn’t save. I wanted to shed my scarred and pain-riddled body. One more breath seemed like too much to bear.

“Easy, it’s time for you to wake up.”

I tried to open my eyes but I was a child again, a slave to sleep, needing just two more minutes of rest. But a hand shook my shoulder and little aches came awake through my upper torso and down my spine.

It was this pain that opened my eyes.

I could see after a fashion but my vision wasn’t proper yet. I couldn’t get a bead on the room I was in, but the beautiful Asian woman sitting beside me on the bed was clear and present as a Catholic priest preparing to give last rites.

Instead of incense there was a mild floral scent of perfume.

“Lynne?” I said. My voice was hoarse and congested, cracking hard enough that I thought my throat might bleed.

“I didn’t think you were ever going to wake up, Easy,” the Chinese bit-part TV actress claimed.

“I died,” I said.

She almost responded but then moved to a chair next to the head of my bed.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 41 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    Easy Love

    I love the Easy Rawlins series. This one doesn't disappoint! It is a little different from the others but Easy is Easy. Mouse is Mouse and Mosely is Mosely. Enjoy the read. I am about to read it again.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2013

    Easy is back!

    It is so exciting to read about Easy's return to LA's scene along with his longtime friend, Mouse. I have read all of Walter Mosley's books and he scored a home run again. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys fast-paced adventure.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2013

    At least another ten or more 5 Star ratings from texters/nooker

    At least another ten or more 5 Star ratings from texters/nookers that don't mean a thing as far as book reviews go. Please go play your games elsewhere and quit ruining this book review process.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Gator¿s Blood

    “Little Green” by Walter Mosley is the 12th installment in the Easy Rawlins Mysteries. This was the first time I ever read a Walter Mosley novel, so in the beginning of this novel I soon discovered that there must have been quite a cliffhanger from the previous novel, “Blonde Faith.” Nevertheless, I was able to understand what had happened in the previous novel - that Easy was left for dead after running his car off of a cliff.

    Easy is soon found fighting for his life and is in a coma for quite some time. When Easy awakens he finds himself surrounded by family and friends. Although in a lot of pain, he realizes that his life was spared. The questions he asks himself are: why and for what reason? Mouse, his best friend and dangerous sidekick, makes a request of Easy to look into the disappearance of a young black man, Evander ‘Little Green’ Noon. Easy cannot understand what is so important that Mouse would come to him to look into the disappearance, but soon realizes that Mouse has secrets of his own and that Evander’s mother cannot stand Mouse for some inexplicable reason. The question is why? Rising from his bed shortly after coming out of the coma Easy searches the streets of the last known place that Evander was seen, downtown in L.A. where the hippies reside. Easy is about to discover that not only is he searching for Evander but others are too. Why? Will he find him before the ones out to harm him do?

    “Little Green” by Walter Mosley is a very good read. I cannot believe that I have never read anything of his prior to this. After reading the 12th installment in this series I plan to go back and read the series from the very beginning. I have questions about some of his family and other characters. I would like to see how they came to be part of Rawlins’ adopted family. The overall story is interesting because it is a mystery that is set during 1967. Mr. Mosley does a great job in his descriptive narrative of what the streets looked like and the characters during this time frame. It is a very good story and I look forward to picking up more books by Mr. Mosley in the near future.

    Reviewed by: Leona

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2013

    Easy is back!

    The story was exciting and suspenseful. The gradual increase of Easy's prowess was realistic. Although Mosley increased the level of vocabulary, I was able to complete the novel in two days.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 7, 2013

    A great addition to what has become a classic series

    This was like a reunion with long lost friends. It has all the magic of every book in this series: a great plot, wonderful larger than life characters and some Easy social commentary thrown in. I also appreciated more the deft way in which Mosley creates a story with mythic qualities without disturbing the gritty feel of modern life. Easy always has a grateful friend more than willing to help him overcome any obstacle or foe, even death. It has all the magic of King Arthur, The Magic Flute or Harry Potter without our ever feeling we have left our own world. My only complaint is that it ended too soon.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Apparently, the author got tired of Easy Rawlins six years ago,

    Apparently, the author got tired of Easy Rawlins six years ago, and had him drive over a cliff on the Pacific Coast Highway in what was either a possible suicide attempt or an accident. But like Conan Doyle, he could not resist bringing him back to life in this fascinating novel, leaving it to Mouse to find Easy and then struggle to carry him up a mountain and to a bed in which Easy lay in a semi-coma for months. When, finally, Easy wakens, still weak, Mouse asks him to help find Evander, whom he calls Little Green, the 19-year-old son of an acquaintance.

    It seems that Evander went up to the Sunset Strip, where he met a “hippie” girl, ingested LSD and ended up in possession of more than a quarter of a million dollars belonging to a gangster. Weak but fortified by a voodoo elixir, Easy finds the boy and then embarks on a beguiling journey to learn just what happened while Evander was in a drug-induced fog and to whom the money belonged, and then eliminate the dangers to the boy.

    Walter Mosley’s Easy Rawlins mysteries are in a class by themselves, featuring a black PI who is a survivor of the Battle of the Bulge and other World War II battles, in ‘60’s LA just after the Watts riots when the area is rampant with mistrust and prejudice against the minority blacks, irreverent, well-read, and the father of ‘found’ children, one of whom who lives both inside as well as outside the law. It’s wonderful to have him back after a too-long hiatus, and the novel is recommended.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    Great Read!

    The story moved quickly and held my attention. Did not want to put the book down. Each character is painted with such precision that the reader actually can see and hear them.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2013

    I enjoyed this book! I ready for the next Easy Rawlins #13 is su

    I enjoyed this book! I ready for the next Easy Rawlins #13 is sure to be a charm.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    I was very upset with Mr. Mosley when Easy Rawlins went off the

    I was very upset with Mr. Mosley when Easy Rawlins went off the cliff in 2007, but my old friend is back. Reading this book was like
    catching up with friends from the 'old neighborhood' Thank you for saving Easy Rawlins!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2013

    The best thing about these mysteries is that the city of Los Ang

    The best thing about these mysteries is that the city of Los Angeles and the era that they take place in are each characters just as important as Easy and Mouse. Even though Little Green picks up only a short time after the last book, Blonde Faith, ended, it's clear that the times are changing fast.




    Recovering from driving off a cliff, Easy agrees to help his friend Mouse find a missing young man, "Little Green", who has disappeared after a bad drug trip. Easy really should be recuperating, but with help from a strange potion made by Mama Jo, he hits the streets to work on his latest case. In classic noir mystery style, nothing fazes Easy Rawlins. Whether maneuvering through the hippie masses on Sunset Strip, sleeping in a makeshift drug commune set up in an upscale mansion, or helping a friend with a corporate espionage case, he takes it all in stride, in pain, and doped up on that potion. Meanwhile, we, the reader, are on the edge of our seats with worry.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 22, 2013

    If your a fan it is a must read.

    I love Walter Mosley! His writing always makes think of film noir. I have read pretty much the whole series. I have read his other work. He can be pretty graphic at times but that makes his voice very real.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 8, 2013

    Highly Recommend

    I knew it, I knew it, I knew Walter Mosley was not going to kill off his most famous character, Easy Rawlins, I also knew Mouse was going to be instrumental in finding & saving Easy, I am so glad Easy and Mouse are back. Way to go Mr. Mosley. And Thanks.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    I pre-ordered the hardcover  of the awaited Little Green in hope

    I pre-ordered the hardcover  of the awaited Little Green in hopes of getting one with the author's signature.  Alas, no such luck.  But my disappointment was short lived.  This book grabbed me from the beginning.  What an inventive way to"revive" a supposedly dead character!  I really enjoy the reactions to the changes of the early '60s where even a white man might  be a black man's ally.  I haven't finished the book yet.  I am savoring it, trying to make it last a bit longer--  even though the wonderful writing tempts me to devour it.  A longtime fan of Mr. Mosely's work, M

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Easy and Mouse, my favorite twosome. As usual the two find lots

    Easy and Mouse, my favorite twosome. As usual the two find lots of trouble and deal with it their way. I love that the characters are getting older and Walter Mosley notes that LA is changing. Keep up the good work Walter Mosley, keep giving us the Easy/Mouse combo.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    I love the Easy Rawlins series. I was crushed when Easy drove o

    I love the Easy Rawlins series. I was crushed when Easy drove over that cliff in the last book and was so excited to see that Mr. Mosely brought my dear friend back to life. The book was very good. While Easy searched the streets for the missing boy, he also wrestled with being dead and realized that as tough as he is, love was the only thing that took him over that cliff. It was great catching up with the other characters, Mouse, Feather, Jesus, Ma Jo and the others. Excellently written, Mr. Mosely makes you feel like you are living in the book, it was such a smooth read. I really enjoyed it. Can't wait for the next book in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2014

    I enjoyed the story very much and am looking forward to the next

    I enjoyed the story very much and am looking forward to the next book. The narrators of the book really bring the story to life and I enjoy listening to the cd as I am commuting or travelling down the highway. I have been a long time fan.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    Little Green = BIG

    He's alive, he's alive!!! Easy is NOT dead. At first that was hard to believe and wrap my mind around, but Mr. Mosley set everything straight with rehashes of what happened after that terrible accident and made me really accept that Easy is living.
    This was a good read. I enjoyed the mystery the chases the fights the characters from the past (that are still dead but gave much clarity to the story at hand). Youngsters in love. Easy still in love with Bonnie Shay. Family love. Mystery-Love-Chases-Shootings-Deaths-Revenge-Closure, this book had everything!!!

    SDCexy

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    Bios

    Bios

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    Ash

    Brittny you there

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)