Little Hoot

Little Hoot

3.6 12
by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Jen Corace
     
 

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It's not fair! All Little Owl wants is to go to bed at a reasonable hour, like his friends do. But Mama and Papa say little owls have to stay up late and play. So Little Owl spends all night jumping on his bed, playing on the jungle gym, and doing tricks on his skateboard—but he's hooting mad about it! Children who have a hard time going to bed will love this

Overview

It's not fair! All Little Owl wants is to go to bed at a reasonable hour, like his friends do. But Mama and Papa say little owls have to stay up late and play. So Little Owl spends all night jumping on his bed, playing on the jungle gym, and doing tricks on his skateboard—but he's hooting mad about it! Children who have a hard time going to bed will love this fun twist on the universal dilemma.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
KIRKUS REVIEWS, STARRED REVIEW
Another captivating, crowd-pleasing twist on a familiar domestic issue....a hoot and a half.

WRITING AND RUMINATING BLOG
You simply must read this book. MUST, do you hear me?

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Amy Krouse Rosenthal neatly appeal[s] to the sensibilities both of bedtime rebels and of their law-giving parents.

THE BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS
Kids who fight the seductive charms of straightforward bedtime books may find this reversal of the usually persuasions too funny-and convincing-to resist.

SHELF AWARENESS
Little Hoot is a hero any parent could love

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL
This fun reversal of traditional bedtime woes is sure to be enjoyed by many children.

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL/A FUSE #8 PRODUCTION BLOG, REVIEW OF THE
I have seen effective bedtime tales in my day, but few are such perfect little packages as 'Little Hoot'....It is funny. It is memorable. I say we have a winner.

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, STARRED REVIEW
This outing is not to be missed.

Carolyn Hax
Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Jen Corace's Little Hoot shares the general roots…of the Olivia and Madeline books, by drawing nutrients from the rich realities of raising those little tyrants known as children.
—The Washington Post
Daniel Handler
Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Jen Corace strike a beautiful balance between story and art in Little Pea…Rosenthal's text never gets too cute—O.K., maybe "they lived hap-pea-ly ever after" is pushing it—and Corace's illustrations similarly provide bounce and verve without rolling their way into treacle. The sequel, Little Hoot, is just the kind of follow-up one wants. The same thing only different, it gives us a family of owls whose baby does not want to stay up late. Corace's illustrations are more daring, throwing a wider color spectrum into the mix and showing a slight anime influence. The book feels familiar right away without losing its sense of surprise—such a pleasure to read that even "they owl lived happily ever after" can be forgiven. More!
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

The team that pertly turned the eat-your-vegetables dilemma upside-down with Little Peaagain puts reverse psychology to work, this time for the sake of bedtime. Like his legume counterpart, Little Owl has a great life-except for one thing: "All my other friends get to go to bed so much earlier than me! Why do I always have to stay up and play? It's not fair!" This follow-up lacks the full-strength visual quirkiness of Little Pea: the peas' stripped-down roundedness (they were essentially a family of heads) made everything they did even funnier. The considerably more anthropomorphized owl family, on the other hand, feels recognizable, which blunts the comic impact of their bizarro worldview. Even so, this outing is not to be missed. Rosenthal and Krouse plant little gags throughout-when Little Hoot is seen at school, the lesson on the chalkboard reads "who/ whom/ whose"-and they sustain the joke with such twisted-logic gems as this one from Papa Owl: "I don't give a hoot what time your friends go to bed. In this family, we stay up late." Ages 3-up. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2- Rosenthal successfully continues her twisted take on traditional childhood dilemmas that she began in Little Pea (Chronicle, 2005). Little Hoot is a happy owl except at bedtime. All of his woodland friends get to go to bed early, but he does not. "Why do I always have to stay up and play? It's not fair!" Little Hoot tries to convince his parents to let him retire early, only to be forced to play for one more hour. According to his father, he must stay up late if he wants to grow up to be a wise owl. His mother tells him, "Ten more minutes of playing, Mister. And please don't ask me again." Little Hoot flies straight to bed ignoring his parents' offers of bedtime stories and glasses of water. Detailed ink and watercolor illustrations are uncluttered and placed on plenty of white space. Text and art convey parental love, filial annoyance, and everything in between. This fun reversal of traditional bedtime woes is sure to be enjoyed by many children.-Catherine Callegari, formerly at Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH

Kirkus Reviews
Another captivating, crowd-pleasing twist on a familiar domestic issue from the creators of Little Pea (2005). Little Hoot likes school, and doesn't mind practicing pondering and staring like a good owl-but hates, hates, hates having to stay up late. All of his friends go to bed early, so why can't he? "Rules of the roost," says Papa Owl. "Stay up and play for one more hour and then you can go to sleep," says Mama Owl. "When I grow up, I'm going to let my kids go to bed as early as they want," grumbles Little Hoot, slouching off for another hour's fort-building, skateboarding and bed-jumping. Corace puts her big-headed birds in human dress and surrounds them, along with the occasional leaf-decorated bed or chair, with plenty of white space. Even very young children will respond to the outsized outrage that Little Hoot expresses in every simply drawn line and-when the long hour is up at last-the joyous release with which he bounds into bed without even waiting for a bedtime story. Parents too will find this droll switcheroo a hoot and a half. (Picture book. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811860239
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
12/20/2007
Pages:
36
Sales rank:
162,274
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 8.37(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
3 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is a Chicago-based writer. She is the author of the bestselling books I Wish You More, Duck! Rabbit!, and the beloved Little Pea and Little Oink.

Jen Corace received her BFA in illustration from the Rhode Island School of Design and has illustrated a number of children's books, including Little Pea, Little Oink, and her newest Chronicle Books title, Telephone. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

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Little Hoot 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
ConfuzzledShannon More than 1 year ago
An owl named Little Hoot wants to go to bed early but his parents say he has to stay up late and play so he may be a wise old when he is older.  Very cute story.  Although I worry reading it to a child before bed because Little Hoot can stay up late what’s to say that the child will want to stay up because of the little owl.  The artwork fits the cuteness of Little Hoot temper tantrum not wanting to stay up and be a night owl.  He looks bored as he has “fun”.
book4children More than 1 year ago
Little Hoot is a charming story that plays on the usual childhood complaint of having to go to bed early. Little Owl wants to go to sleep, but his parents insist on him staying awake all night like a proper owl. My children loved this book because it is the exact opposite of their bedtime complaints. The illustrations are simple, adorable, and beautifully designed. From the use of white space to the gentle colors used, Jen Corace creates a sweet and child like escape from the often mundane and dreaded chore of going to bed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is cleverly written. The lesson in it is adorable and children enjoy how it is the opposite of life as they know it. Little Pea by the same author is another favorite in our house.
Wayne Smith More than 1 year ago
This font is awful on screen. Makes an otherwise good book bad.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Aunt_Kim-VA More than 1 year ago
I bought this book for my nephew who was turning 5 years old. He loves listening to it over and over again and he also enjoys the illustrations. When he requests it for a bedtime story, adults and older siblings are happy because it is not too long and they find it humourous, as well. Even though this child is not uncooperative at bedtime, he still thinks it is funny that the owl in the story begs to go to bed like all his friends, while his parents want him to stay up longer. I highly recommend this book and plan to purchase others by this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seems like a baby book i like something that is a novel but the reviews seem good but it all depends on if you like a short or a long book