Little Horse

( 2 )

Overview

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Author Biography: Betsy Byars is the author of many award-winning and popular books for children, including The Seven Treasure Haunts and Tornado. Ms. Byars was awarded the Newbery Medal for The Summer of the Swans. She and her husband live in South Carolina.

David McPhail is the author and illustrator of many books for children, including

the popular Pig Pig stories. He lives with his family in ...

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Overview

]>

Author Biography: Betsy Byars is the author of many award-winning and popular books for children, including The Seven Treasure Haunts and Tornado. Ms. Byars was awarded the Newbery Medal for The Summer of the Swans. She and her husband live in South Carolina.

David McPhail is the author and illustrator of many books for children, including

the popular Pig Pig stories. He lives with his family in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Little Horse falls into the stream and is swept away into a dangerous adventure and a new life.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Little Horse lives in a valley with other little horses. One day Little Horse falls into the river and is swept away from his home. He struggles onto an island, but a hawk frightens him back into the water. On land again, Little Horse wanders through an amazing colorful forest, finally falling asleep between the roots of a gigantic tree. He is picked up by a human. His new home is a miniature stall in the little boy's room. Though Little Horse is safe, he dreams of the valley where he was born, leaving the door open for a sequel. In her chapter book fantasy, Byars provides more complex sentence structure than usually found in easy readers. David McPhail's soft pencil drawings are confusing, however. The first illustration shows a tiny horse standing beside reeds. But the hills in the background are out of proportion. Other drawings suggest Little Horse is bigger as well. It isn't until the illustration of the hawk chasing Little Horse that the reader realizes Little Horse is very small. 2002, Henry Holt,
— Candice Ransom
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-This book seems at first to be a realistic wild horse story but it soon bridges into light fantasy. Little Horse falls into a river and is carried away from his homeland. After narrowly surviving a tumble down a waterfall and evading capture by a bird of prey, he comes to a land where flowers are as tall as trees. It is here that he-and readers-realize that he is tiny-about the size of a squirrel. His relative size presents new problems as he is chased by a dog and feels the ground shake at a man's approach. However, the man proves to be gentle and caring. He takes the animal home and gives him to a boy who provides food and an appropriately sized shelter. Little Horse falls asleep dreaming of returning to his homeland. Young horse lovers will delight in the idea of a real horse they could hold in their hands and will enjoy the small creature's adventures. The simple, sometimes-repetitive sentence structure is similar to that in easy-readers but the format is a more standard paragraph form and the print size is smaller than most. Though Little Horse's adventures are sometimes terrifying, McPhail's soft, almost fuzzy-lined black-and-white illustrations lend a comforting air of reassurance even at the scariest moments. These pictures also add to Little Horse's character and charm. While there is not much depth to this story, it will provide sweet feed for young equine enthusiasts just venturing into chapter books.-Louise L. Sherman, formerly at Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A satisfying horse story with a new twist. Little Horse lives in a remote valley with his family and other horses. One day, he strays from the protection of his family, takes a drink from the river, and is carried far away from his safe valley. Disaster after disaster meets Little Horse, but he relies upon luck and his wits to survive. The story's surprising twist comes when the reader realizes that Little Horse really is little. Little enough for the flowers to look like trees. Little enough for a hawk to try to pick him up. This unexpected detail separates Little Horse from many beginning chapter books. When Little Horse meets humans for the first time, he is terrified by their size and then comforted by their care. McPhail's (Mud Is Cake, below, etc.) warm pencil illustrations add excitement and understanding to each page. McPhail can make Little Horse look lonely or terrified or comforted. Though the word choice, fast pace, and predictable adventures are perfect for the child who is ready to move beyond easy reading books, the story line provides fantastical and philosophical questions often lacking in books for children of this age. (Fiction. 6-10)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805098709
  • Publisher: St. Martins Press-3pl
  • Publication date: 4/28/2002
  • Pages: 62
  • Sales rank: 1,002,712
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Betsy Byars is the author of many award-winning and popular books for children, including The Seven Treasure Haunts and Tornado. Ms. Byars was awarded the Newbery Medal for The Summer of the Swans. She and her husband live in South Carolina.

David McPhail is the author and illustrator of many books for children, including the popular Pig Pig stories. He lives with his family in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 2, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    quasi fantasy book for beginning readers

    When I first read Little Horse on His Own, which I reviewed previously, I did not know that it was a sequel until I did some research for writing the review. While in the library not long ago, I found the original. Like its sequel, Little Horse is an early chapter book and tells the story of how Little Horse, who lives in a valley with other little horses, accidentally falls into a stream that carries him away from his home. He first lands on an island where a giant hawk swoops down on him. Heading back into the water, he reaches land again and finds himself in a forest, but instead of the little trees with which he is familiar in his home valley, it is a forest of colorful flowers. Frightened by a dog, he tries to flee but is picked up by a hand which tucks him inside the dark, warm pocket of a pair of overalls and takes him to a farm where there are other horses, but they are giants compared to him. His new home is a toy stall in a little boy's room. However, he is already dreaming about his journey back to his home. This is obviously a quasi-fantasy book, but small children, who have to live in a society where so much is made for larger adults, should be able to identify with Little Horse's predicament of finding himeself in a world where everything is huge.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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