Little Lion

Overview


One day, Dad comes home with a lion. “Brought you a dog,” says Dad. Mum and the children don't believe him, but they call it Dog, let it sleep in the dog basket, and keep quiet about their strange, noisy pet. But Big Jonno, the school bully, is curious, and tries to make life tough, until one day, the worst thing happens — the Lion escapes and finds Big Jonno.

This delightfully surreal story by a multi-award-winning author and talented illustrator — in which a bully ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $6.05   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview


One day, Dad comes home with a lion. “Brought you a dog,” says Dad. Mum and the children don't believe him, but they call it Dog, let it sleep in the dog basket, and keep quiet about their strange, noisy pet. But Big Jonno, the school bully, is curious, and tries to make life tough, until one day, the worst thing happens — the Lion escapes and finds Big Jonno.

This delightfully surreal story by a multi-award-winning author and talented illustrator — in which a bully gets his just deserts — will keep young readers guessing all the way through!

The inspiration for this story came from the Bleek-Lloyd collection of stories written down by the linguists Wilhelm Bleek, his daughter Jemima and his sister-in-law Lucy Lloyd when they were recording the language and stories of the |Xam* people of the Northern Cape in South Africa.
The original story doesn’t have a middle or an end, but it has a very funny beginning when a man brings a lion home and tells his wife it’s a dog.
* The | represents a ‘click’ sound.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The lion lived in the garden most of the time . . .
but at night it slept in a basket in the kitchen, a dog basket.
At night, when we couldn't sleep, we could hear it roaring.
'That's not roaring,' said Dad. 'That's snoring.'"
— from the book
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
When Dad comes home one day with a lion that he insists is a dog, Mum says the family should just go along with it. Our young narrator and his brother find it hard to sleep when the lion roars, but Dad says it's just snoring. After a while, they all get used to having the lion around. But the boys try to keep the unusual pet a secret. Unfortunately Big Jonno, the local bully, finds out and teases them. One day the lion gets out of the house. Searching for it, the boys discover it on top of a terrified Jonno. They wait a bit before calling it off, enjoying their triumph. "Then we took our dog home." They smile as they figure Jonno will not bother them again. The jacket illustration of a smiling lion and a dish labeled "DOG," suggest the dilemma inside. The many pictures of the objects related to a dog's life add to the mix-up. The ink and watercolor scenes are naturalistic but rendered with comic intent. The story is based on a South African folk tale, but the illustrations suggest a contemporary suburban South African community with kids in school uniforms. The most fun comes as the growing lion tries to play the role of family dog. The front end pages are filled with doggy items, while on the back pages, the lion gazes fondly at a lamppost on a moonlit night. A note discusses the original folk tale. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847801890
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln Children's Books
  • Publication date: 7/24/2012
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 3 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.90 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Lesley Beake is a multi-award-winning writer for children and young adults. Her international awards include, for Song of Be, a Children's Book of Note and the Best Book for Young Adults by the ALA. Outside South Africa her books have been published in ten countries. Her first book for Frances Lincoln was the highly-acclaimed picture book Home Now, illustrated by Karin Littlewood. She lives in Simon's Town, near Cape Town, South Africa.
Erika Pal was born in Budapest, Hungary. She came to England and took a BA in Animation and Illustration at Kingston University. Since then she has worked as a bookseller, assistant animator, potter, actress, babysitter, chef and libretto translator. Twice highly commended for the Macmillan Prize, she designed the winning logo for the Big Picture campaign and is a member of the East London Printmakers. Her first book for Frances Lincoln was Azad's Camel, followed by I See the Moon. She lives in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, U.K.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)