Little Madhouse On The Prairie

( 39 )

Overview

"Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is Marion Witte's compelling chronicle of growing up as an abused child on a North Dakota farm in the 1950s.

Her story begins, however, two generations earlier, when her immigrant grandparents struggled to eke out a living on the unforgiving Mid-western plains. With clear-eyed compassion, Witte chronicles lives of unimaginable difficulty. Too often, frustration and hopelessness erupted in alcoholism and violence.

Little Marion had an older ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $5.50   
  • New (1) from $105.00   
  • Used (8) from $5.50   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$105.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(177)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

"Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is Marion Witte's compelling chronicle of growing up as an abused child on a North Dakota farm in the 1950s.

Her story begins, however, two generations earlier, when her immigrant grandparents struggled to eke out a living on the unforgiving Mid-western plains. With clear-eyed compassion, Witte chronicles lives of unimaginable difficulty. Too often, frustration and hopelessness erupted in alcoholism and violence.

Little Marion had an older brother and younger sister but she was the preferred target of her mother's wrath. The beatings, punishments and neglect were all but ignored by her family, leading her to believe she must certainly have earned her mother's fury in some unfathomable way.

Only after making friends with a schoolmate who invited her into her own warm and supportive home did young Marion begin to sense that a different and better way of life existed outside the Witte family farm. Marion soon realizes that academic success is her ticket to freedom; she works hard to put herself through college in three years and score one career achievement after another.

But not even career triumphs, a wonderful husband and a beloved child are not enough to quell the internal demons that prevent her from living a truly authentic life. To heal herself and make peace with her harrowing past, she embarks on a solo journey that embraces many different modalities of therapy - from traditional to spiritual.

Although it takes many years, Witte finally reconciles with the wounded child inside and begins to surround herself with the love she that was so painfully denied. From this place of hard-earned harmony, Marion Witte has dedicated herself to work tirelessly for the right of children to be free of emotional and physical abuse. In 2005, she founded the Angel Heart Foundation, whose vision is "All Children Deserve A Safe and Just World."

By shedding light on the cultural roots of her own abuse, Witte sets the stage for a way out of the cycle of violence of all children. "Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is an impassioned plea for action to extend human rights to the planet's youngest citizens. Her memoir also offers ways one can heal from the wounds of abuse.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Reviews
AN INSIGHTFUL LOOK AT THE DARK SIDE OF RURAL LIFE

Life on the farm is not always the serene and happy picture it was on television. "Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is the memoir of Marion Witte, telling her own story of growing up in a small farm house, where she faced abuse from her mother on a regular basis, and which took her years to recover from. Stating how she overcame her own traumatic childhood, and with plenty of wisdom for those now facing the same, "Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is an insightful look at the dark side of rural life.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780982225424
  • Publisher: Angel Heart Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/20/2010
  • Pages: 226
  • Product dimensions: 0.52 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 6.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Marion Witte is the author of “Little Madhouse House on the Prairie,” a memoir that chronicles her abuse as a child, as well as the healing process that finally brought her peace as an adult. She is the founder and director of the Angel Heart Foundation, which is dedicated to advocacy for children’s rights.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt – “The Cellar”

As I grew older, sometimes my mother would engage my brother in carrying out my punishment. An offense worthy of a serious reprimand, such as “sassing back,” would have harsh repercussions, one of them being locked in the cellar. I would obey my mother’s command to walk into the pantry and wait while my brother opened the cellar door so that I could descend the stairs. I do not remember being upset with my brother for his involvement. I told myself that he was only following orders and he would not harm me on his own. Soon enough I would find out that I was wrong about that.

The pantry was adjacent to the kitchen. Flour, sugar and canned goods lined the wooden shelves, along with purchases from the Watkins Company. The traveling salesman, whom we children fondly called the “Watkins Man,” would stop at the farm monthly, selling the seasonings, spices, baking goods and fruit punch mix he carried in his truck.

The cellar door was in the floor of the pantry. It was about three feet by six feet, and one side of it was hinged to the floor. My mother or brother opened it by pulling up on a large metal ring on the door, then waited while I carefully descended the ladder-like stairs that led from the pantry into the darkness of the cellar.

The cellar was basically a dirt dug-out that provided a cold storage area for canned goods and potatoes. There were no windows. A single light bulb hung from the ceiling and its pull chain dangled from the fixture. It was impossible for a small child like me to reach the chain, so when I was in the cellar, it was absolutely dark. No light seeped in around the edges of the overhead door. It was stark, abject darkness. My brother, or sometimes my younger sister, was given the job of standing on the cellar door so I could not open it from underneath. It would have made no difference if it had not been sealed in this manner; my terror was enough to make me a prisoner. I was five years old when my mother first made me go down to the cellar. Even as I write this, the hairs on the back of my neck rise in a replay of that terror.

In the darkness and silence, I heard the scratching and scurrying of the mice and rats that infested the cellar. At times, I thought I saw their eyes staring at me. Sitting on one of the rungs of the ladder, I would pull my legs up to my chest as tightly as I could. I thought if I didn’t breathe maybe those little demons would not hear me, and they would not bite at my toes. I became an expert at not breathing.

The first time I remember experiencing what I have come to think of as “leaving my body” was in the cellar. I can best describe this as a disassociation of thoughts and emotions from the experience. I was fully awake and aware of what was happening, yet it was as though I was an observer of the event instead of the one experiencing it. My physical senses seemed to be dulled, and although I could still see and hear, I had little feeling or emotion about what was occurring. This technique, which I believe my mind developed as a survival tool, was out of my control. It would automatically take over at times when I experienced extreme pain, terror, or danger. When I “returned” from one of these episodes, I would often still be experiencing the physical pain but have no conscious recollection of any feelings that were associated with the event. As I later came to understand, the emotional aspect of the memory had been deeply buried in my unconscious, where it affected my behavior and my deepest feelings about myself in the most insidious and harmful ways.

When I was in the cellar, and still in my body, I sat on the stairs and had many thoughts about myself. “I was bad.” “I was unworthy.” “I was unlovable.” I never saw my brother or sister being put in the cellar, so I thought there must be something terribly wrong with me. I thought these thoughts, sitting in the dark on the wooden stairs, and I held on to these ideas, even though they were untrue, throughout many of my adult years. The cellar abuse stopped when I was eight, but I continued to abuse myself with my cellar thinking for years to come. The cellar became a perfect representation of the isolation and abandonment I felt as a small child. And having continually experienced this as a youngster, it became very natural for me to find situations and environments that recreated these experiences well into my adult life.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 39 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(38)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Amazing Journey to Recovery from abuse

    This is the story of Marion the child who grew up in a farmhouse in North Dakota; it was far from a happy home. It is also about Marion the grown-up dealing with the after-affects of being abused. What sets this book apart from other books about abuse is it doesn't detail all the abuse she suffered, yes she tells us about some of it, but it is more about her journey to recovery.

    This book touched me in so many ways one, because it is set in my home state of North Dakota the farmhouse she describes is so much like the one my grandparents had although luckily for me our farmhouse was full of love.

    The journey to self-awareness Marion goes on is powerful and heart wrenching, the pain she suffered at the hands of her mother, brother and alcoholic emotionally absent father follow her through everything she does even when she doesn't realize it. As we go on this journey with her, to psychotherapy, hypnotherapy and even a shaman to help her deal with the demons left inside by years of physical and emotional abuse. We finally meet the amazing woman Marion becomes, because of what she has gone through. We see a woman who has come to self-realization, healing and forgiveness and came out of it a better person.


    If you were touched by the books Child Called It or The Glass Castle this is a must read.

    5 Stars

    Full Disclosure- I won this book through Goodreads Giveaway

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 28, 2011

    Transferred Review to New Edition

    Transferred Review to New Edition

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 28, 2011

    Posted Review on Newer Edition

    A Review is posted on the newer edition.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)