Little Madhouse on the Prairie: A True-Life Story of Overcoming Abuse and Healing the Spirit

( 42 )

Overview

Marion Witte was raised in a little house on the prairie, but her childhood was

nothing like the idyllic version of childhood made famous by Laura Ingalls.

Witte's story has its roots in immigrant grandparents who struggle to make

a living on the harsh Midwestern plains. ...

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Little Madhouse on the Prairie: A True-Life Story of Overcoming Abuse and Healing the Spirit

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Overview

Marion Witte was raised in a little house on the prairie, but her childhood was

nothing like the idyllic version of childhood made famous by Laura Ingalls.

Witte's story has its roots in immigrant grandparents who struggle to make

a living on the harsh Midwestern plains. Unbelievable hardship, alcoholism,

abuse and abandonment were the norm during her youth. Witte endured

punishments that had devastating emotional effects. She was often locked in

a dark, dirty cellar with the rats and mice, terrifed and too little to turn on

the light bulb that hung high above her.

As Witte retells the circumstances of her youth, it becomes clear that this

book is much more than a compelling story of childhood mistreatment. The

crux of her story maintains that once abuse stops, the psychological damage

lingers. Even as Witte graduated from college, became a CPA, and had her

own family, she knew that there were wounds to be healed. Witte takes the

reader on the journey she pursued to heal from the past, and the pitfalls and

successes of that process. Her honest and compassionate portrayal draws the

reader into an analysis of negative adult behaviors and why we may behave

in an emotionally immature manner. This is a book that connects the dots

between our childhood experiences, our current adult behavior and the way

we parent.

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Editorial Reviews

INDEPENDENT PUBLISHER MAGAZINE
Growing up as a farmer’s daughter on the prairie, surrounded by lush green fields, should have been idyllic. Instead, generations of family dysfunction and fear created a nightmarish childhood of abuse and abandonment that took Marion a lifetime to overcome. Here is her life story, told with soul-baring detail, about the journey from anger and shame, to awareness and acceptance, and eventually -- forgiveness. This heartfelt tale of recovery is told with a loving spirit that proves to the reader that yes, there is always hope, and always a pathway back to grace. Jim Barnes, Editor
Midwest Book Reviews
AN INSIGHTFUL LOOK AT THE DARK SIDE OF RURAL LIFE

Life on the farm is not always the serene and happy picture it was on television. "Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is the memoir of Marion Witte, telling her own story of growing up in a small farm house, where she faced abuse from her mother on a regular basis, and which took her years to recover from. Stating how she overcame her own traumatic childhood, and with plenty of wisdom for those now facing the same, "Little Madhouse on the Prairie" is an insightful look at the dark side of rural life.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780982225431
  • Publisher: Wise Owl Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,043,344
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Marion Witte is a writer, speaker, entrepreneur and child advocate. She established the Angel Heart Foundation, a non-profit organization that promotes personal healing as a primary step in abuse prevention. By telling her own story, she hopes to open readers’ eyes to the serious and long-term damage caused by all forms for childhood mistreatment. She argues that only through awareness, education and healing can society prevent such future violence. The author's website is marionwitte.com
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Read an Excerpt

"The Cellar"

As I grew older, sometimes my mother would engage my brother in carrying out my punishment. An offense worthy of a serious reprimand, such as "sassing back," would have harsh repercussions, one of them being locked in the cellar. I would obey my mother’s command to walk into the pantry and wait while my brother opened the cellar door so that I could descend the stairs. I do not remember being upset with my brother for his involvement. I told myself that he was only following orders and he would not harm me on his own. Soon enough I would find out that I was wrong about that.

The pantry was adjacent to the kitchen. Flour, sugar and canned goods lined the wooden shelves, along with purchases from the Watkins Company. The traveling salesman, whom we children fondly called the "Watkins Man," would stop at the farm monthly, selling the seasonings, spices, baking goods and fruit punch mix he carried in his truck.

The cellar door was in the floor of the pantry. It was about three feet by six feet, and one side of it was hinged to the floor. My mother or brother opened it by pulling up on a large metal ring on the door, then waited while I carefully descended the ladder-like stairs that led from the pantry into the darkness of the cellar.

The cellar was basically a dirt dug-out that provided a cold storage area for canned goods and potatoes. There were no windows. A single light bulb hung from the ceiling and its pull chain dangled from the fixture. It was impossible for a small child like me to reach the chain, so when I was in the cellar, it was absolutely dark. No light seeped in around the edges of the overhead door. It was stark, abject darkness. My brother, or sometimes my younger sister, was given the job of standing on the cellar door so I could not open it from underneath. It would have made no difference if it had not been sealed in this manner; my terror was enough to make me a prisoner. I was five years old when my mother first made me go down to the cellar. Even as I write this, the hairs on the back of my neck rise in a replay of that terror.

In the darkness and silence, I heard the scratching and scurrying of the mice and rats that infested the cellar. At times, I thought I saw their eyes staring at me. Sitting on one of the rungs of the ladder, I would pull my legs up to my chest as tightly as I could. I thought if I didn’t breathe maybe those little demons would not hear me, and they would not bite at my toes. I became an expert at not breathing.

The first time I remember experiencing what I have come to think of as "leaving my body" was in the cellar. I can best describe this as a disassociation of thoughts and emotions from the experience. I was fully awake and aware of what was happening, yet it was as though I was an observer of the event instead of the one experiencing it. My physical senses seemed to be dulled, and although I could still see and hear, I had little feeling or emotion about what was occurring. This technique, which I believe my mind developed as a survival tool, was out of my control. It would automatically take over at times when I experienced extreme pain, terror, or danger. When I "returned" from one of these episodes, I would often still be experiencing the physical pain but have no conscious recollection of any feelings that were associated with the event. As I later came to understand, the emotional aspect of the memory had been deeply buried in my unconscious, where it affected my behavior and my deepest feelings about myself in the most insidious and harmful ways.

When I was in the cellar, and still in my body, I sat on the stairs and had many thoughts about myself. "I was bad." "I was unworthy." "I was unlovable." I never saw my brother or sister being put in the cellar, so I thought there must be something terribly wrong with me. I thought these thoughts, sitting in the dark on the wooden stairs, and I held on to these ideas, even though they were untrue, throughout many of my adult years. The cellar abuse stopped when I was eight, but I continued to abuse myself with my cellar thinking for years to come. The cellar was a perfect representation of the isolation and abandonment I felt as a small child. And having continually experienced this as a youngster, it became very natural for me to find situations and environments that recreated these experiences well into my adult life.

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Reading Group Guide

Book Club Discussion Topics

1. "Little Madhouse on the Prairie" begins by tracing the author’s family back several generations. What cultural conditions described in the book may have led to child abuse? How has parenting changed over the last several generations—or has it?

2. Did you feel sympathy for the Witte family’s hardships? What is the author’s attitude toward her ancestors? Why do you think the author wants readers to know about her grandparents’ lives?

3. As a culture we tend to romanticize farm life. What is the author’s attitude toward life on her family’s farm? Does she describe any positive aspects of being left to roam around the farm unsupervised?

4. The author vividly recounts the moment when she realized that keeping a spotless house was more important to her mother than treating her daughter with love. Do mothers today ever feel pressured to put housekeeping over the needs of their family?

5. Was the author’s brother to blame for his mistreatment of his sister? At what point did her brother shift from protector to tormentor? Do all families have a member who seems to get more than their share of abuse? 6. The author describes how television shows of the 1950s gave her a window onto a very different kind of family life than the one she knew. Discuss what she saw and whether or not you think television might play a similar role in the life of abused children today.

7. Why did no teacher, friend or family member step in to halt the abuse of the author? Were they unable to see the signs or was it completely hidden from view? What is our role in society when we see child abuse? Do we have an obligation to step forward? 8. What finally caused the author to confront her mother and say, more or less, enough is enough? Why doesn’t this bring about the end of the author’s misery?

9. To what does the author attribute her drive for perfection and achievement in college? Did it bring her happiness? 10. Were you surprised by the author’s relationship to alcohol? What in her history led her to take a pledge of sobriety? 11. The author’s in-laws provided loving parental role models. She tells a touching story of how her own daughter’s smudgy fingerprints were left on her mother-in-law’s sliding glass doors for weeks as a precious reminder of the little girl. How does the way in which we were parented influence our own parenting? Can we ever completely reject the voices and values that are drilled into us as children? Have you ever heard yourself say something to your children that was exactly what your mother would have said?

12. The author leaves her seemingly wonderful husband to embark on a journey to heal herself. How did you feel about this unorthodox choice? Respect? Censure? Have you ever had to make a similar choice?

13. Of the many paths the author traveled to heal from abuse, which seemed to have worked the best? Why?

14. As the healing process begins to give the author perspective on her life, do her attitudes towards her mother, father and brother change? Discuss the role that forgiveness plays in her struggle to be whole.

15. The author confronts a woman who is abusing her child at a department store. What action do you think the author hopes people will take as the result of reading "Little Madhouse on the Prairie"? What would you do if you saw a child being abused in public?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 42 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    POWERFUL AND HEART WRENCHING

    This is the story of Marion the child who grew up in a farmhouse in North Dakota. It was far from a happy home. It is also about Marion the grown-up dealing with the after-effects of being abused. What sets this book apart from other books about abuse is it doesn't detail all the abuse she suffered. Yes, she tells us about some of it, but it is more about her journey to recovery.
    This book touched me in so many ways because it is set in my home state of North Dakota. The farmhouse she describes is so much like the one my grandparents had, although luckily for me our farmhouse was full of love.
    The journey to self-awareness Marion goes on is powerful and heart wrenching. The pain she suffered at the hands of her mother, brother and alcoholic emotionally absent father follow her through everything she does even when she doesn't realize it. We go on this journey with her, to psychotherapy, hypnotherapy and even a shaman to help her deal with the demons left inside by years of physical and emotional abuse. We finally meet the amazing woman Marion becomes, because of what she has gone through. We see a woman who has come to self-realization, healing and forgiveness and came out of it a better person.
    If you were touched by the books A Child Called It or The Glass Castle, this is a must read.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2011

    A BOOK THAT ENGENDERS HOPE

    In Little Madhouse on the Prairie, Marion describes the abuse she suffered as a child and the actions she took to recover from the abuse. As a therapist, I am struck with her progression from being a victim to personal empowerment. That came with the commitment to heal herself, not merely to survive the abuse, but to thrive. Her journey through various modes of healing will be valuable to others who have not yet made this journey. In the final section, Lessons I have Learned, the reader will gain an understanding of how childhood abuse can affect one's behavior in the present. The book engenders hope because Ms. Witte shows that it is not the abuse itself, but rather her responses to the abuse, that creates the person one becomes. Nan Gold, M.A., MFT Past President of the Southern California Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    AN INSPIRATIONAL AND SPIRITUAL READ

    I loved this book! I think I may just start rereading it all over again from the beginning, this time with a highlighter in hand. There were so many poignant pearls of wisdom, garnered from a childhood of abuse as Marion Witte morphed into this amazing adult willing to forgive those who treated her unkindly. So much to be learned from her examples of forgiveness and the peace it brought to her in her life. This book opened my eyes up to events which I hadn't remembered in years. That could actually have not been a good thing except she gave me the tools so that I can investigate, accept, forgive and get on with my life. I still have a lot of work to do but I have direction now. I was fortunate enough to actually meet Marion at an event at which time she remarked "there are no coincidences" as she shared a copy of her book with me. Man, was she ever right. I would highly recommend this book to my friends and family and look forward to reading her next book, too. Two thumbs up. :-)

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    AN ABSOLUTE MUST READ!

    It is such a brave thing to uncover such a taboo topic such as child abuse and speak for so many individuals who are still suffering and lost in their past.

    This book is really for anyone and everyone. It may appear at first to be written for the child abused audience, but it is absolutely for everybody because child abuse is more prevalent than many believe. 1 in 4 individuals have, are, or are going to be abused. The book is well written due to the fact that it is a simple biography on one individual's life that many people can identify with.

    She believes that we cannot begin to heal our wounds until we admit we are wounded. It sounds so simple, but is often so difficult for so many individuals to do. She believes that no matter what type of abuse that a person has been through healing and recovery is possible. She also feels that forgiving the unforgivable in order to heal the heart and spirit is a must. Releasing the past pain came after she forgave her abusers for abusing her, and forgiving her father for not being there for her and neglecting her. The most important lesson she learned is to forgive. This book leaves you feeling hopeful and inspired.

    I am the President of the ADS Peer Leadership Club at Oxnard College and enrolled in the Addiction Disorder Studies Program. The program educates and trains students to become a counselor in the field of mental health, addiction, and so on. We learn a lot about child abuse and in my opinion it is something I run into more often then none, while working in the field of counseling. I met Ms. Witte after she came to our class as a guest speaker to talk about her journey and her book. We then had Ms.Witte come back to be guest speaker again for a Domestic Violence Awareness event to speak to future counseling students. She was a true success...and they loved her book and her presentation. I recommned this book personally and professionally. You should purchase this book for you and those you love.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 17, 2011

    GOOD READ FOR A BOOK CLUB

    I am a member of a small book club in Los Angeles. Each of our members takes a turn picking out the next book we will read. Some pick current best-sellers, some pick old classics, and some relatively unknown books.
    A friend recommended Little Madhouse on the Prairie as my selection, and I picked it for several reasons:
    -We had just finished a book by a big name author, and I wanted to compare that type of read to a book by a new author
    -The subject material of the book was intriguing to me
    -The book contained a Book Club Discussion section which was very helpful
    I must say I was shocked as I read this book, perhaps due to the sheltered childhood I had. I come from a very loving home, so the idea that a child could be treated the way it is portrayed in the book was very foreign to me. It was not the easiest material to absorb, but I am glad I stuck with it. For one thing, I feel so fortunate to have been raised in the environment I was. The "problems" in my childhood seem very unimportant when I now understand what other children have to endure. I also realize now that I probably have friends in my life who have had difficult childhoods, but who don't talk about it because of the guilt and shame. I think reading this book has opened my eyes, and made me a more aware and compassionate person.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 27, 2011

    Could Not Put It Down

    I must admit I had this book for about two weeks before I actually picked it up and read it. When I finally started the book, I couldn't put it down. At times it brought tears to my eyes. I felt like I was there with you. I could relate to much of it. The emotional abuse, the family looking good on the outside to others, the brother who tormented you, babysitting, staying busy so you wouldn't have to go home, your friend Beverly, and your dad was my dad. When you talked about the families on TV...that hit home. I used to think that those kind of families were only on TV. I used to watch the Cosby Show and wish I was in that family. Reading your book and hearing what you have to say has opened my eyes. It gave me a little more understanding of myself. I removed the blinders and am much more aware of what is going on around me. I admire your open mindedness, to whatever works (hypnosis) for the healing process. I am one who wants to save the world but like you say, "one person at a time." Thank you Marion for being you and helping me to be a better me. You are an inspiration and I hope to follow your lead.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 18, 2011

    HONEST, SIMPLE AND STRAIGHTFORWARD

    A simply straightforward story of a real woman's life, written with a kind of honesty that is enchanting and brave. It's the real life of one valiant woman, yet on a deeper level it is the story of so many women, and one of archetypal proportion. Ms. Witte is a kind of Pied Piper for women and children, so many of whom have suffered and stayed silent, entreating us to come forward into the light and follow her example. This is the kind of book that comes back to you over and over long after you've read the last page and closed the book. Hurray, Marion, for your honesty and for the road you've traveled. Hurray for you, and hurray for us, your fans and readers, who feel your experience deeply. Your suffering, hard work, joy, dedication and bravery feeds the souls of all who read your words. This world is a richer place because Marion Witte has had the courage to step forward and share her story with the rest of us.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 25, 2011

    Helped Me Understand What Others Go Through

    I am not a victim of abuse so I did not expect this book to impact me so greatly, but boy was I wrong. This is a moving story about an amazing woman whose inner strength is an example to all of us. It helped me to understand other people and to help those in my family who have suffered their own traumas. Thanks to Witte's willingness to share her story, other people have hope of healing as well. I recommend this to any person no matter what your own life experiences have been.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 25, 2011

    A Provocative Read

    To be of real interest, every character you meet, either in life or in a book, must be vulnerable, resilient and, finally, able to endure and survive. Ms. Witte, in her memoir of childhood abuse, reveals all of these qualities and takes us with her on a triumphant voyage. That she felt she had to do it alone is a poignant reminder of her innate strength. Little Madhouse on the Prairie is a provocative read for anyone who is involved in childhood abuse, either as a secret perpetror or victim. Witte showed that a person does not need to stay in either role forever, and that a little child can lead parents away from the trap of imitating their own abusive parents. As in most of life, forgiveness is the key to survival. As Witte learns to forgive, her chances of recovery grow steadily. Reading this book can teach one much about forgiveness. Rev. Dr. Addyse Palagyi

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 25, 2011

    I Was Drawn Into This Book

    It took a lot of courage for me to pick up the book and begin to read "Little Madhouse on the Prairie." I was afraid I would have nightmares, or it would feel like getting a tooth drilled without Novocain. I thought the subject of child abuse would be too painful. Yet I was surprised to find myself drawn into the scenes in the book with a fascination and interest in exploring just how resilient the spirit can be. I was inspired to know that one can survive that much distress and come out fighting for life, saying "no, you cannot treat me like that anymore," and with a belief that a child could grow up with the ambition and drive to create a better life. It is inspiring that we as human beings can go thru this much horror and be able to heal to the point of wanting to give something back. It is a sacrifice to write, relive and share the experiences in the book. It is a gift to bring the conditions out that have usually stayed in the closet. The book is a tool to advocate for children to have the right to have a safe, sane and enriching environment in which to grow up. I am certain more children will be protected because of this book. It is a must read for anyone interested in children, healing and education.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 19, 2012

    Story Of My Life

    Thank you Marion for such a strikingly similiar story of my own. The book was so familiar that I read into the wee hours. I simply could not put it down. It seemed to peer into the fiber of my being with an understanding of my personal childhood experiences.

    The alcoholic dad, the abusive mother, family characteristics passed down through generations are very real. I can relate to the feeling of being all alone and inferior; the supressed anger emerging at inopportune times was the story of my life. Going to school embarassed of my hand-me-downs did not help matters either. The getting beat with anything that touched my mother's hand with no explanation was devastating to my childhood experiences. I can relate to practically everything written.

    The encouraging aspect of the book is the reality that there is an individual recovery process of healing from childhood trauma. It helps the reader realize how important brutal honesty is in recovery. It encourages us to face the issues head on with courage knowing that at the end of the day, we will become whole persons. This wonderful read lets the reader know that recovery, hope and love is bound together in wholeness by the all important forgiveness of self and others. I liked this book a great deal and encourage others to read it with and open mind.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 27, 2011

    The Willpower to Triumph

    Reading this book, you sense how lonely and scared Marion felt at different times in her life. Life is challenging for a child who is not shown unconditional love. Reading this book, you want to reach out and rescue her. Neglect & abuse can leave deep scars that take a long time to heal, if ever. Marion shares the abuse she was exposed to and the process in which she goes through to heal her life. Reading this book makes you realize that one does not have to remain the victim or repeat the cycle of child abuse. This book presents the power of hope and the willpower to triumph over an abusive childhood. I would definitely recommend this book to others. Thank you Marion for sharing your past & your journey of healing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 25, 2011

    Honest and Inspirational

    Honest and inspirational,"Little Madhouse on the Prairie" chronicles Marion Witte's triumph over an abusive childhood. Written in a straight-forward and engaging style, the book begins by Marion poignantly recalling the double-tragedy that took place while she was growing up. Not only did she suffer unspeakable abuse by family and friends of family, but she also suffered tragic neglect from those who knew about it and were supposed to protect her, but did nothing stop it. It is hard to imagine that a parent could do either, but Marion's story shows us that this dark cycle can be broken and a new legacy of hope can grow. In later chapters, Marion outlines the hard work she did to overcome the scars of her abuse and the important role of forgiveness. She outlines various options that an individual can take to not only survive, but to absolutely thrive as she did! This is an important book for anyone that is a parent, works with children and especially to those who share this type of unfortunate history. Thank you Marion for bravely reaching out to those who need help, as well as for such a powerful reminder on the importance to love and advocacy for all children.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2011

    A Difficult Topic Delivered with Grace

    I enjoyed this simple but very profound read. It engaged me to the point that I finished it in one day. This book delivers a message of hope that is appropriate for so many people, for if we thought about it, we all know someone who has been subjected to some form of mistreatment. The author presents enough background information about her childhood to set the stage for the remainder of the story, without telling us everything that happened. This approach makes the story very readable, without leaving one in total shock or a state of sadness. After portraying her childhood experiences, the book changes tone as the reader is carried on a journey of recovery and hope. For me, I have a new appreciation for what some children go through, and a deeper level of compassion.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2012

    The true life story of Marion Elizabeth Witte, Little Madhouse o

    The true life story of Marion Elizabeth Witte, Little Madhouse on the Prairie is an incredibly informative and eye opening book. In this book, Marion Witte writes openly and truthfully about her abuse-ridden childhood. Her story about unbelievable trials and circumstances is so personal and contains such raw and real emotions that it is impossible to not be moved by it. Reading this book has really opened my eyes to what the life of one who is abused is like. Things that I would have never imagined or expected to happen to a child happened to her. Witte shares openly about the abandonment, neglect, hurt, and physical and emotional abuse she has experienced throughout her life. Her story draws you intimately into her personal account and thoughts in a way that allows you to see through her eyes as child, teenager, and adult. Her account continues from childhood to adulthood, and allows one to see the severe repercussions of abuse that follows one for the rest of their lives. While reading this book, you will ache when she aches and feel the hurt that she feels. You will find yourself getting angry when she does, and rooting for her when she overcomes huge obstacles. This story does not only tell about the battle, but it draws you into it and makes you eager to fight alongside of her against the monstrosity of child abuse. I highly recommend this book to read. I am thankful that Witte wrote this book and bared herself so honestly. This book was necessary for me to read in order to understand the nature and magnitude if child abuse. Now I feel better equipped to understand the large amount of people who have been affected by it, and more eager to help end it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 24, 2012

    TOUCHED ME TO THE CORE Reading Little Madhouse on the Prarie was

    TOUCHED ME TO THE CORE
    Reading Little Madhouse on the Prarie was like taking a journey through my own life. There were pieces that were a bit different than my own life and yet I felt connected, so connected in fact that I felt the need to contact the author directly and convey the message to her. Her book gave me ideas on how I might move forward in healing my own traumas and bring light and love to the parts inside that have been hurting for many years. For the first time in a long time I feel as though I have the opportunity to feel whole again. If Marion can do it, so can I!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 12, 2012

    This was an amazing, and very inspirational book. Marion did a f

    This was an amazing, and very inspirational book. Marion did a fabulous job at telling her story through her emotions as a child. It is easy to read, but very hard to put down. It keeps you captivated, hanging on every word. Every one has some sort of abuse as a child, weather is neglect, verbal, emotional, physical, or sexual abuse.

    I love how Marion is living proof, and shows it in her book, that the cycle of abuse can be broken in families. Also that no matter what your journey growing up takes you through - how you deal with it determines what kind of life you will have and what kind of person you will become.

    She is an amazing, strong, and generous person. I am so thankful she wrote her story for the world to read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 10, 2012

    I loved reading this book. I didn't want to put it down. But if

    I loved reading this book. I didn't want to put it down. But if I had to put it down I was excited to pick it back up to get the stories of her childhood. I think child abuse was so much easier to get away with then because it wasn't paid attention to as so much as it is now. Reading this book had me remembering my childhood and how I can relate to alot of things you experienced. I learned to love my child more and more as he grows up, and try to pay attention to all the little things that are going on, because they are little to us but big to them. I don't want to give my child any reason to have a disturbed life in his future, especially in relationships. If I had to rate this book from 1 -10. My rating would be a 9. I hope others have an opportunity to read this book.

    Thankyou,
    Malia M. Arkangel

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    I really don't like to read but after reading this book I sense how lonely and scared Marion felt at different times in her life . Life is scary for who is not shown unconditional love in her life. In giving voice to her wounded inner child, Witte's gift is also giving voice to the wounded. She is a true healer that she makes the tough choice to stop the habit of looking for a quick-fix and take up this journey that the healing process often demands. She does not find healing too easy, but does give hope and inspiration , as she guides her readers through this sad story to a place of self-discovery, transforming her hardship into resource. Witte's work, which demonstrates raw pain abuse causes is a soulful offering to the individual and desire to make peace and open to loving kindness within ourselves and others.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2012

    It's hard to say that you enjoy a book that deals with serious t

    It's hard to say that you enjoy a book that deals with serious topics such as child abuse. But, I definately had a soft spot for this engaging read. You can't help but think back to your childhood while reading the account of her own. This book deals with subject matter that touches every human emotion and takes you all the way through the darkness to the authors ultimate redemption and forgiveness. Forgiveness not only of those responsible for her abuse but for herself as well. The truths she shares so openly give insight into a world of both dread and fear in navigating her own childhood as well as her experience as a mother herself. An excellent read for both those who have suffered abuse and seek the road to recovery and those who wish to understand the nature of abuse from someone who has been there and made it through. I Highly recommend picking up this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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