Little Miss Liberty

Little Miss Liberty

3.3 17
by Chris Robertson
     
 

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A story of lighthearted account of how Statue of Liberty came to New York. An enjoyable romp?and perfect read-aloud?it will entertain even the squirmiest listener and yet in its own quiet way remind us why Lady Liberty is both unique and important.  See more details below

Overview

A story of lighthearted account of how Statue of Liberty came to New York. An enjoyable romp?and perfect read-aloud?it will entertain even the squirmiest listener and yet in its own quiet way remind us why Lady Liberty is both unique and important.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Robertson enters the children's book arena with a lighthearted tribute to the Statue of Liberty on the 120th anniversary of her inauguration on the 4th of July. Little Miss Liberty-depicted in blackline cartoon and painted with her usual patina throughout-is born on a July morning in Paris. Robertson depicts her as a toddler reaching for the cookie jar, with pacifier in mouth, mimicking the real statue's pose. The heroine rapidly outpaces her peers and eventually her parents in the size department. Cheery cartoons accompany an ambling narrative that aims to humorously explain the statue's appearance (e.g., "Her parents had a hard time finding clothes that would fit her. Finally, they gave up and wrapped her in a queen-size bed sheet"). The story also sets out to describe the statue's symbolic role. When she started school, "Little Miss Liberty was a friend to all... to those who felt different or misunderstood, lonely or sad." After outgrowing her home, she journeys around the world (lit torch in hand) and finally settles in New York harbor. Most watercolor vignettes are dominated by a single hue, allowing the green Miss Liberty to be the focal point of each scene. Many of the comic nuances and symbolism may be missed by those not familiar with the statue or U.S. history. But more sophisticated readers will likely appreciate this whimsical account of how the statue came to America. Ages 4-up. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-In this vapid tale, the Statue of Liberty is personified as an infant born in Paris, whose "coloring was a little on the green side." She matures and learns rapidly and is "especially kind to those who felt different or misunderstood, lonely or sad." The child soon outgrows her surroundings and travels to distant lands until she finds the perfect spot in New York harbor where she "stands with pride, continuing to grow taller and smarter-every day." The watercolor-and-ink cartoon illustrations feature a palette of greens, from the watery-looking endpapers, to Little Miss Liberty, to the washes on several of the vignettes. Depictions of the Eiffel Tower and New York's Chrysler building as well as building blocks on the cover usher in the metaphor carried throughout the story: freedom is a concept that grows with learning and understanding and spreads throughout the world. However, the youngsters for whom the story is intended will probably not be able to see beyond the literal tale of a baby who turns into a statue; conveniently finds "a pedestal of perfect size, color, and proportion"; and remains there "with pride." Exercise your freedom to pass on this story that will likely confuse more than enlighten its readers. Youngsters would learn far more by reading Allan Drummond's Liberty! (Farrar, 2002).-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community College, CT Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781619890336
Publisher:
Castaway Books
Publication date:
04/27/2012
Sold by:
Sachmanya
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
727,598
File size:
9 MB
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Chris Robertson is a writer, illustrator, and animation storyboard artist living in California, with his wife, Stephanie, and their two sons, Carter and Benton. Chris first attended school at Lassen Elementary in the San Fernando Valley, where he was introduced to Curious George, Madeline, and Harry the Dirty Dog by the Bookmobile. Chris could tell, even at an early age, that children's books were going to be an important part of his life. This is his first children's book.

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Little Miss Liberty 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Parent-Teacher More than 1 year ago
Fun, engaging and educational tale about Statue of Liberty that both adults and kids would equally enjoy. Great illustrations!
DirtbagDoug More than 1 year ago
I use this book even in my classroom of fourth graders to get them interested in American history. I highly highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was cleverly written but the ending felt a little too abrupt. Still a pretty good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
2nd graders enjoy!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Little Miss Liberty evokes a sweet sense of innocence. The illustrations are absolutely charming with just the right amount of humor!Little Miss Liberty is sure to be an instant classic!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is really a lovely and charming book with sweet and wonderful illustrations. Its perfect to read to children in the classroom and before bed!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is incedible! What a wonderful story and such lovely illustrations too. My little girl thought it was so cute, she insists we read it every night.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But very little to do with American history! Im glad it was free, so I don't feel bad deleting it!
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crew4reading More than 1 year ago
I did not want to give this a 1-star rating because the author was creative in telling the story and the book had nice illustrations. I just did not care for the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Did not like