The Little Moon Princess

The Little Moon Princess

3.5 2
by YJ Lee
     
 

Way up in the sky, a little girl sits by herself in a field filled with sparkling jewels. She is the Little Moon Princess. When one day a sparrow comes to visit, she confides in him that even though she's a princess, she still gets scared of the dark. With the help of her new friend, will the Little Moon Princess find a way to light up the sky so she's no longer

Overview

Way up in the sky, a little girl sits by herself in a field filled with sparkling jewels. She is the Little Moon Princess. When one day a sparrow comes to visit, she confides in him that even though she's a princess, she still gets scared of the dark. With the help of her new friend, will the Little Moon Princess find a way to light up the sky so she's no longer afraid?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Long ago, a tiny sparrow came across a little princess living on her moon surrounded by a garden of jewels. The princess was happy in her home, but she saw that beyond her moon there was only inky darkness and she was afraid. "The darkness is so wide and I am so very small," she lamented. The sparrow suggested they spread her jewels throughout the sky to create some light. He took some of the jewels in his beak and placed them in the sky, the princess took a deep breath and blew some into the blackness, and others were scattered in the draft created by her billowing cape. The sparrow carried the princess' brightest jewel the greatest distance from her moon, and the stardust that trailed behind him as he returned formed the Milky Way. With even the darkest corner of the sky sparkling with light, the little princess was no longer afraid. Perfection pervades this appealing creation myth from each carefully chosen word to the watercolors swirling between light and dark. The bright yellow of the princess' moon gives way to the menacing and desolate blackness of the sky beyond which in turn becomes a midnight blue with tiny pinpricks of light when the jewels are scattered. What could have been saccharine and sentimental is saved by the beauty and simplicity of Ms. Lee's language and impressive watercolors. A fine debut. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—An original story of how the stars came to be in the sky. Little Moon Princess lives alone on a moon amid a field of jeweled flowers surrounded by a vast darkness. A sparrow stops by and comments on the loveliness of her home. Little Moon Princess agrees and says she is happy but it frightens her that she cannot see beyond it. The sparrow suggests spreading her jewels in the sky in order to light up the darkness and together they do just that. The result is a beautiful night sky. Lee's stunning use of watercolor and ink creates the illusion of light, and her art offers readers a breathtaking view of the night sky. A lovely read-aloud at storytime.—C. J. Connor, Campbell County Public Library, Cold Spring, KY
Publishers Weekly
Lee's debut, a creation story about the Milky Way, escapes the ponderousness of many invented myths, and her artwork contributes a glowing, lighter-than-air quality to the pages. The surface of the princess's moon is covered with flowers, a multicolored jewel at the center of each one. When she confesses that she's afraid of the dark, a visiting sparrow asks, “Why don't we spread your jewels throughout the sky so they shine in the darkness? Then you will never be afraid again.” This potentially treacly suggestion is tempered by the dark gray mist surrounding the moon, in which toothy creatures seem to lurk, making the princess's fear easy to understand. The princess and sparrow struggle to distribute the jewels properly; when tossing them by hand and blowing them into place fail to do the job, the princess scatters them with her cape. After the sparrow delivers one final jewel, “the brightest star of all,” the two cuddle under a quilt of star-studded night. It's a fruitful combination of ordinary bedtime elements and interplanetary sweep, and a fine first effort. Ages 4–8. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Literary fairytales often lack the vigor and authenticity of traditional folktales. There is no hint that this gentle tale was inspired by an ethnic folktale; rather, it evokes faint echoes of Saint-Exupery's Little Prince and whispers of fairytales from Andersen and Wilde. A charming little princess lives alone on the Moon with no visible means of support, surrounded by flowers, each set with sparkling jewels. One day a sparrow flies in from somewhere; the princess confides that the darkness of space (there are as yet no stars) frightens her, so the sparrow suggests they pick the jewels and scatter them in the sky for light. The rest of the story is devoted to their efforts to spread the stars throughout the universe: a jewel from her crown becomes the "brightest star of all" (though it is not the Sun), while the sparrow trails stardust to form the Milky Way—the happy princess is no longer afraid. At the end, the tale reveals itself as a pourquoi story: "remember the little moon princess who gave up her jewels so the night sky could sparkle and shine." Lee's transparent double-page spreads of stars, clouds, and skies both muted and bright are very lovely. (She is a graduate of the Parsons School and New York's School of Visual Arts.) This delicate story with its sense of the vastness of space will probably be appreciated most by a thoughtful child in the warmth and closeness of an adult lap. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
Kirkus Reviews
Long ago, there was a little princess who lived on a moon filled with sparkling jewels. Her moon shines brightly against the dark sky, because this is a time before there were stars. The princess likes her jewels very much, but the blackness that surrounds the moon scares her. One day, a visiting sparrow suggests that she spread her jewels far into the sky so that they brighten the darkness. After valiantly trying, and failing, to toss and blow the baubles of light into the distance, she takes off her cape and waves it through the air. The jewels begin to scatter. For one last dark, empty spot, the little princess takes her favorite jewel from her crown and the sparrow drops it into place. Lee's carefully chosen text and hushed tone set the foundation for this Little Prince-flavored spin on a familiar creation myth, but the luminous illustrations make it soar. The darkness howls with shadows of hidden monsters, while the light swirls through it, filling the pages with glowing pinpricks. A more-than-respectable picture-book debut. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061547362
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/30/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

YJ Lee is a talented young artist whose areas of expertise are drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpting. She received her BFA from Parsons the New School for Design and her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. This is her first picture book for children.

YJ Lee is a talented young artist whose areas of expertise are drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpting. She received her BFA from Parsons the New School for Design and her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. This is her first picture book for children.

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Little Moon Princess 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
melclem More than 1 year ago
This books was so tender and beautiful and my 3yr old loved it. The pictures are like lovely watercolors on the pages and the overall story is one of sharing. This is a great read for your little ones!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago