Little Pig Joins the Band [With Audio CD]

Little Pig Joins the Band [With Audio CD]

by David Hyde Costello, Emily Eiden
     
 

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Little Pig has trouble keeping up with his older—and bigger—brothers and sisters. When Grandpa gets out his old marching band instruments for the pigs, Little Pig is too little for the trumpet, trombone, and the drums. And the tuba? Forget about it. Little Pig soon realizes, though, that this disorganized marching band could use a leader—and he is

Overview

Little Pig has trouble keeping up with his older—and bigger—brothers and sisters. When Grandpa gets out his old marching band instruments for the pigs, Little Pig is too little for the trumpet, trombone, and the drums. And the tuba? Forget about it. Little Pig soon realizes, though, that this disorganized marching band could use a leader—and he is the perfect little pig for the job.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Pre-S-Gr 2—David Hyde Costello's humorous story (Charlesbridge, 2011) about Little Pig who is too small to play any of the marching band instruments stored in a box at Grandpa's house. Whenever Little Pig asks his siblings a question, it is comically misheard. For example, when he asks if there are any piccolos, the response is "There's a jar in the fridge behind the olives." Finally, Little Pig realizes that the rag-tag group needs a little organization, so he finds a whistle and gets them lined up and marching in step. Costello's clever asides come to life via Emily Eiden's terrific narration. The "Little Pig March," composed by Rory Young and Arnie Cardillo, is wonderful and all the music and sound effects add to the meaning and enjoyment of the text. Costello's illustrations are spot-on! Pair this with Mary Raynor's Garth Pig Steals the Show (Dutton, 1993), A Pig Parade Is a Terrible Idea (S & S, 2010) by Michael Ian Black, and the DVD version of the tale (SLJ, Sept. 2012) from Nutmeg Media. This delightful production will be enjoyed by students and teachers and might even inspire them to organize a class parade.—Lonna Pierce, MacArthur Elementary School, Binghamton, NY
Publishers Weekly
"Sometimes Little Pig didn't like being little, or even being called Little Pig," writes Costello, as his diminutive hero, taking up what readers can assume is his usual position at the distant end of a family procession, vainly attempts to remind his oblivious relations: "My name is Jacob!" Things only get worse when the family puts together an impromptu band from Grandpa's collection of instruments: when Little Pig asks whether there's something smaller to play, like a piccolo, an elder cheerfully remarks, "There's a jar in the fridge, behind the olives." But the ensemble gives Little Pig his opening when they prove utterly unable to coordinate their movements: seeing them colliding and collapsed in a pig pile on the floor, Little Pig "knew what the problem was—the band needed a leader!" Costello (I Can Help) isn't pioneering new ground with this story of how a family's littlest member asserts his competence, but the combination of lovely and understated text, sly watercolors, and a protagonist who knows in his heart that he's right make the premise feel fresh and funny. Ages 4�7. (July)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Little Pig does not enjoy being called "Little Pig" instead of his real name, Jacob. When his older brothers and sisters take out Grandpa's old band instruments, Little Pig is very disappointed to be too small to play any of them. As each sibling takes an instrument and begins to march, however, he notes their disorganization. He decides they need a leader. With an ear and double-page-splitting "TWEET" in a red blast of color from a whistle, Little Pig, now in drum major's hat with baton, gets everyone organized. As they thank him, finally calling him Jacob, he decides that "Little Pig" will do. Ink and watercolors are used to visualize this very appealing hero of the light-hearted tale. The anthropomorphic pigs all ignore one another and give comic responses when Little Pig asks for a small instrument. Words hang in the air without speech balloons in amusing asides. The subtle drawing suits the narrative. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews

Costello's winsome tale explores the travails of being the youngest and the littlest.

When Little Pig, a.k.a. Jacob, and his brothers and sisters visit their grandpa, they break out his old marching-band instruments. Little Pig, to his dismay, discovers he's just too little to play the drum or trumpet, let alone the trombone or tuba. When his siblings can't get their playing or marching act together—hey presto!—a drum major is born, small of stature but packing a big whistle. Much of the book's amiability derives from the artwork, sure-handed watercolors that are active but not busy, with (most of) the pigs having a merry old time trooping about, tooting and pounding away, collapsing in a heap. Yet the words add a considerable measure to the pleasure. Costello has built a story under the arching narrative, a body of asides that add color commentary: "Do we have any piccolos?" asks Little Pig. "There's a jar in the fridge, behind the olives," replies his distracted sister. "A kazoo?" "Gesundheit." And when Little Pig does succeed—wielding his baton, he is now Jacob in his siblings' eyes—he takes it with humility: "You can call me Little Pig."

Humor lifts the story from a simple tale of woe to transcendence.(Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781430111399
Publisher:
Live Oak Media (NY)
Publication date:
06/28/2012
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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