Little Pink Slips
  • Little Pink Slips
  • Little Pink Slips

Little Pink Slips

3.9 13
by Sally Koslow
     
 

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'This year's The Devil Wears Prada' (New York Post) from a former magazine publishing insider.

Inspired by her own experiences behind the scenes, Sally Koslow wryly pokes at corporate greed, celeb worship, and the search for Mr. Right? (People)

At 37, Magnolia Gold (nee Maggie Goldfarb of Fargo, North Dakota) is the youngest editor-inchief

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Overview

'This year's The Devil Wears Prada' (New York Post) from a former magazine publishing insider.

Inspired by her own experiences behind the scenes, Sally Koslow wryly pokes at corporate greed, celeb worship, and the search for Mr. Right? (People)

At 37, Magnolia Gold (nee Maggie Goldfarb of Fargo, North Dakota) is the youngest editor-inchief ever to wield a red pen at Lady magazine. And with her loyal staff, parties, and Manolos, she no longer feels out of place.

Enter Bebe Blake, loudmouth television personality and Fashion Don't. To Magnolia's horror, her boss has not only given her job to Bebe, he's also turning Lady into Bebe. And Magnolia will be relegated to a roach-infested back office. Now she'll just have to watch as her beloved mag turns rag. With Bebe all over the cover. In bike shorts?

Editorial Reviews

Booklist
A dishy and delightful insider's view of the elite in magazine publishing, a subject Koslow is more than qualified to spoof.
New York Times
Lively.
Entertainment Weekly
Dead-on.
Stephanie Klein
Whip-smart, scandalous, and chic. (Stephanie Klein, author of Moose)
Publishers Weekly
Former McCall's editor-in-chief Koslow features in her mellow roman ^ clef Magnolia Gold, who gets booted out of her magazine kingdom, but lands on stilettos that "you could almost mistake for Manolos." Magnolia, editor-in-chief of Lady magazine, has her dream job, a Cartier watch and a fab New York apartment, but Lady's publisher and parent company president cozy up to gauche celebrity Bebe Blake and decide-against Magnolia's warnings that Bebe will alienate the mag's "red state Republican" readership-to turn Lady into Bebe and demote Magnolia to "corporate editor," a bogus position that's soon eliminated. (Bebe may remind readers of Rosie O'Donnell, who assumed Koslow's duties at McCall's once it was relaunched as Rosie.) As Bebe ravages the magazine, a down-and-out Magnolia orchestrates her return while she and best friend Abbey run through their share of nonstarter men. Abbey finds Mr. Right, and just as things are looking their bleakest for romantically and professionally flailing Magnolia, lightning strikes twice. Koslow's take on behind-the-scenes maneuvering will keep readers turning the pages of her debut, but her soft-focus on glossy magazine publishing (the same mani-pedis, shopping diversions and expensive meals circuit that have been catalogued elsewhere) feels reserved: the villains aren't especially vile, and the goodies are very goodly-call it a red state The Devil Wears Prada. (Apr.) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal

Koslow, former editor in chief of McCall's, writes a fictionalized account of the magazine's takeover by Rosie O'Donnell. In 2001, McCall'sbecame Rosie, which folded after 18 months amid high drama. The publisher and O'Donnell sued each other, though the judge eventually tossed out both suits. In this thinly veiled roman à clef, Maggie Goldfarb is poised to revamp the nation's oldest women's magazine, Lady. However, her dream job turns into a nightmare when the publishers decide to bring on bawdy celeb Bebe Blake, who quickly sends the magazine to ruin with her temper, bossiness, and lack of publishing know-how. What's more, back stabbing and gossip thwart Maggie's success at every turn. Too many oddly inserted characters and a bland romantic subplot make the story clunky and detract from an otherwise interesting peek at the magazine publishing world. But this is sure to generate massive publicity, and fans of Lauren Weisberger's The Devil Wears Pradawill snatch it up, so public libraries will want to purchase accordingly. [See Prepub Alert, LJ12/06.]
—Rebecca Vnuk

Kirkus Reviews
Dedicated editor-in-chief's brilliant career goes into a tailspin after a flamboyant celebrity takes over her magazine, a plot that mirrors the litigious saga of Rosie (i.e., O'Donnell) magazine, to which former McCall's editor Koslow bore witness. Magnolia Gold might have been born Maggie Goldfarb in Fargo, N.D., but years in the magazine industry have polished her into an elegant Manhattanite who welcomes every day as chief tastemaker for Lady magazine. Sure, the somewhat staid women's title could use a redesign, and that is exactly what Magnolia has planned when the word comes down from corporate that her beloved Lady is being transformed into Bebe, after popular, opinionated talk-show host Bebe Blake. Never mind that plus-sized, foulmouthed Bebe knows nothing about magazines, her addition is assumed to be an opportunity for the company to "mint money" and Magnolia is summarily demoted to a smaller office where she is called upon to execute Bebe's vision, even if that includes an NRA-friendly cover shot that alienates the readership. The capricious Bebe is an unprofessional nightmare who shows up drunk to her own launch party and at one point tries to seduce a young male intern, but she is also capable of big-hearted surprise gestures, such as when she "gives" British actor Hugh Grant to Magnolia for her birthday. And as difficult as Magnolia's position is, it is her oily CEO Jock Flanagan who really gives her trouble-ultimately firing her after she rejects his adulterous advances. Our unemployed heroine is then left to ponder her future as she fights for money owed her by her former corporate overlords, while simultaneously navigating her way through the tricky waters of dating.Perched on the sidelines, she then has a perfect view of the bittersweet dissolution of Lady/Bebe, and is forced to choose between the lesser of two evils when both Jock and Bebe call on her to testify in competing lawsuits against each other. Koslow's zippy prose ably captures the manic intensity and not-always-glamorous world of New York magazines-even if classy Magnolia and her so-so love life are a bit of a snooze. Far more intriguing is the flawed maverick Bebe. Breezy glimpse into the behind-the-scenes shenanigans of modern celebrity culture and the women's-magazine business.
From the Publisher
"Merlington is a seasoned narrator who expertly providescharacters with individual voices.... Merlington's ability to reflect the humorous moments adds to listener enjoyment." —Booklist

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399154157
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
04/12/2007
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Merlington is a seasoned narrator who expertly providescharacters with individual voices.... Merlington's ability to reflect the humorous moments adds to listener enjoyment." —-Booklist

Meet the Author

Sally Koslow, who was born and raised in Fargo, North Dakota, is the former editor in chief of McCall’s magazine. Married and the mother of two sons, she lives in New York City. Little Pink Slips is her first novel.

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Little Pink Slips 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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MELKI More than 1 year ago
Sally Koslow, the author and former editor-in-chief of McCall's, is no Helen Gurley Brown. Her fictional persona, Magnolia Goldfarb, is as vapid as her dying magazine was at the end. For a book, Pink Slips, is rather mediocre, but if you read it as you would watch a silly chick flick, it might be passable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LPG More than 1 year ago
This book was so well written, I couldn't put it down. I finished the book in a matter of days and I usually get bored after the first couple of chapters. Little Pink Slips should def. be put on the top of your list. Get it now, you won't be sorry. If you liked Devil Wears Prada, you will love this book even more. I plan on reading it again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. It was fun and frothy - perfect reading in the summer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Former McCall's editor has written a novel that is as annoying as it is amusing. I should put this novel in my 'guilty pleasures' list. It's an engrossing and juicy story about a women's magazine. The first part of the book is simply fascinating but the last part becomes too syrupy and the heroine, from being sympathetic becomes right down insufferable. Sally Koslow's alter ego, Magnolia Gold, is too irresistible, too wonderful, too everything and with that she loses her previous charm. Still, it is one good fun reading. Like most women's mags, it is amusing and annoying in equal parts.
Guest More than 1 year ago
one of my new favorite novels, little pink slips was such an enjoyable read i never wanted it to end!
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was like listening in to a funny conversation about the magazine industry. Fast paced, funny and absorbing. Much better than TV.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ladies, you will rue the moment you are forced to put this gem down, as I did when I had to go pick up my kids from school! I was completely enthralled from the first page behind-the-scenes look at a NYC Chanel sample sale, devoured the details about life in the magazine world, and more tellingly fell immediately in love with the quirky, slightly neurotic, totally likeable, done-wrong-by Magnolia. LPS is so much more than a voyeristic look into the shambles of a once strong magazine (think McCall's) after a loud-mouth celebrity (you know who) and the magazine's publishers decided to re-vamp the beloved mag in the image of said celeb. Sure, it's fun to wonder about which details in the book came from Koslow's experience as the wrongly ousted editor in the McCall's/Rosie debacle but what's more fun is becoming completely enraptured in this story's characters and their confidently shaky walks through the world of magazine publishing and relationships, of the friend and spouse kind, that will leave you with a new favortie author to add to your list. Koslow's writing style is like chick lit having gone to an esteemed Ivy league school - her wit is charming, her prose simply perfect, all making for a biting, totally engrossing read. This one will be on the best-seller lists and will leave you wanting to know when Koslow's next novel will hit the stands!