The Little Prince

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Overview




After being stranded in a desert after a crash, a pilot comes in contact with a captivating little prince who recounts his journey from planet to planet and his search for what is most important in life.
 
For over sixty-five years Antoine de Saint-Exupery's classic, The Little Prince, has captured readers' hearts. The whimsical story with a fairy tale feel has sold over 3 million copies in all formats. This ...
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2000 cd-rom Near fine condition with case CD-rom, featuring Kenneth Brannagh as narrator. Unscratched CD-ROM.

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Overview




After being stranded in a desert after a crash, a pilot comes in contact with a captivating little prince who recounts his journey from planet to planet and his search for what is most important in life.
 
For over sixty-five years Antoine de Saint-Exupery's classic, The Little Prince, has captured readers' hearts. The whimsical story with a fairy tale feel has sold over 3 million copies in all formats. This exciting pop-up edition includes the complete original text accompanied by Saint-Exupery's beautiful illustrations brought to life through paper engineering. Perfect for longtime fans and those meeting the little prince for the first time! 

An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Fans of that stellar Little Prince can celebrate his 60th anniversary with a stunning gift edition! A must-have for any collector, this edition comes with a satin ribbon bookmark and presentation page, all enclosed in a cloth slipcase with gold stamping. The starry prince has delighted readers for six decades, but he's never looked better.
Publishers Weekly
This unabridged edition of the classic story about the prince from a tiny planet “hardly bigger than a house” integrates the original illustrations into pop-ups, wheels, and flaps. The text is gracefully balanced against the interactive elements as the Prince shares his story: flaps reveal images like the drawing of a sheep that the narrator makes for him, and delicate pop-ups feature characters he's met, like the clownlike lamp lighter. The pleasing visual effects are subtle, but add an appropriate sense of magic. Ages 9–12. (Oct.)
Publishers Weekly
Many old friends revisit readers in handsome new volumes. Always welcome is that charming visitor from another planet, Antoine de Saint-Exupery's The Little Prince. A 60th-anniversary gift edition features a cloth slipcase, a satin ribbon bookmark and a bookplate. The fable remains as lyrically haunting as ever in Richard Howard's new (2000) translation. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Young Osment (The Sixth Sense; Pay It Forward) again proves his mettle as an actor, giving voice to the Little Prince in this crisp, full-cast production of the literary classic. He approaches the role with a gentleness and sensitivity that touches the heart and never sounds maudlin. As the pilot whose plane has crashed in the Sahara, Gere plays it low-key, creating a perfect partner for Osment's interplanetary-traveling, wise-beyond-his-years prince. Gere expresses just the right mix of amusement and bewilderment as the prince interrupts the pilot's efforts to repair his plane with a request that he draw a sheep. The adept performances capture the timeless nature of Saint-Exup ry's fable about how a child sees the important things in life much more clearly than many adults do. All ages. (Dec.) FYI: Last year marked the 100th anniversary of Saint-Exup ry's birth. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Those of us concerned with quality preschool literature long for the demise of inappropriate books repackaged into board books. With the publication of four slip-cased board books based on the classic allegory The Little Prince (Friends of the Little Prince, Counting With the Little Prince, A Day With the Little Prince, and I Am the Little Prince/Je Suis Le Petit Prince), one hopes the end is near. On the surface, I Am the Little Prince seems to employ good board book design elements: brief text printed on nursery-pastel backgrounds, watercolor illustrations on contrasting white backgrounds. So far so good. Closer examination reveals that some of the art retains it original clarity while others parts are poorly reproduced. Besides murky illustrations, the bilingual text and art don't always work together. On one page the text reads: "I live on a small planet./J'habite sur petite planete." The accompanying illustration shows the Little Prince standing on his lumpy planet, sweeping out the fenced-in volcano. The text makes no mention of the Little Prince's actions. Children sharing this book would wonder, "What is he doing?" For this age group, illustrations should amplify the story, not go off in another direction. This is what happens when books for older children are reformatted into board books with no regard to the needs and interests of toddlers. 2003, Harcourt Red Wagon, Ages 1 to 3.
— Candice Ransom
Children's Literature - Eleanor Heldrich
The author and illustrator of this famous mid-twentieth century allegory was a World War II French airplane pilot who was shot down and killed within a year of the book's publication. This handsome edition of a much-loved book that has, since its publication in 1943, been translated into eighty different languages and read in more than 180 countries has been given added stature by the quality of this new version. The French designers have used heavy, uncoated (not shiny) paper for a book that is about 8" by 12" by 2," and printed on white, red, black, and yellow sheets. All of the illustrations which are copies of Sainte-Exupery's original drawings for the first edition have been done in ink and water colors and have been engineered to become enchanting pop-ups! The fable is told in the first person by a narrator/pilot who, after a crash landing in the Sahara Dessert, meets the Little Prince who is from another much smaller planet. As the two become friends the little prince describes his travels among other planets he has visited and the people he has met who lived there. Not surprisingly, as the story was written during war time, the qualities displayed by the occupants of the other planets include vanity, greed, power, and blindly following directions. The time covered by the book is only eight days, which is how long it takes the pilot to repair his plane, but it is enough time for the pilot to come to care deeply for the little prince. This is an outstanding book for an adolescent to take into adulthood, for an adult who knew it and loved it, or for anyone who has never known it. Reviewer: Eleanor Heldrich
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-Actors Richard Gere and Haley Joel Osment read Antoine de Saint-Exupery's book with the assistance of several other actors and actresses. A pilot stranded in the desert awakens one morning to see, standing before him, a most extraordinary little fellow, who teaches him the secret of what is really important in life. Gere reads the part of the Pilot, and Osment takes the part of the Little Prince. The reading by all the participants is accomplished with great skill and feeling. Piano and strings provide very lovely background music composed by Alexandre Stankevicius. This abridged recording of the classic book should be welcome in most library collections.-Beverly Bixler, San Antonio Public Library, TX Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From The Critics
Richard Gere is the principle narrator in this superbly produced CD format version of Antoine de SaintEXupery's classic children's story The Little Prince. This fifty minute production is a technically flawless audio version of a pilot stranded in the desert and wakening one morning to see before him a little fellow who captures the hearts and imaginations of all who read (and now hear) this remarkable modern fable. Haley Joel Osment gives voice to the Little Prince, while Marina Orsini, Adam Frost, Richard Allen, Dave Walsh, Ara Y. Kentenjian, Patrick Selitz, and Mickey Kessler lend their talents to this multicast production, with music by AleXxandre Stankevicius. The Little Prince is highly entertaining, enthusiastically recommended, and a "must" for school and community library audiobook CD collections.
Kirkus Reviews
"[E]yes are blind. You have to look with the heart," says the little prince, which makes this pop-up edition of the 1943 classic a bit of an odd duck. De Saint-Exupery's minimalist illustrations become full-color paper-engineered elements in a blown-up, two-inch-thick unabridged edition. Flaps lift, figures pop, tableaux emerge in ingenious fashion, creating a reading experience as surreal as the story. But the tension between text and image inherent in any illustrated book is exacerbated to the nth degree here, as the beguiling doodads beckon readers to race through the pages, leaving the story they're meant to illustrate behind. The contemplative fable is turned into a mere excuse for paper whimsy, the fun of making the prince turn to meet the fox overriding the wonder of the interaction. Too cool for its own good. (Pop-up/fiction. 10 & up)
From the Publisher
"Delineated with a delicate touch, the paper engineering adds a new dimension to this wistful fairy tale without overpowering it, enhancing the story’s subtleties and echoing its sense of wonder."—School Library Journal

"This lovely edition boasts the complete original text and illustrations that are also a delight for the eyes."—Entertainment Weekly
 
"While a pop-up edition of de Saint-Exupery's enduring tale may initially seem like a gimmick, the resulting volume is a beautiful piece of bookmaking that actually extends the classic story ... this unabridged volume offers a creative, accessible entree to the timeless story."—Booklist
 
"The pleasing visual effects are subtle, but add an appropriate sense of magic."—Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
It has been years since I read this classic book, and it was nice to revisit the story of the stranded pilot and the little boy who falls to earth and befriends him. This edition is sleeker in appearance than earlier editions, with a metallic black cover and a picture of the Little Prince in silhouette holding onto a flock of birds. The translation was done by Richard Howard for a 2000 edition, and there have been no additional changes. The story is told in a straightforward manner, rather than the more flowery 1953 text. The primary additions to the book are the cover art and an introduction by Gregory Maguire (Wicked) that reflects on his feelings about being asked to write the introduction. As a great fan of Maguire, I would gladly read his laundry lists for entertainment. There is a short biography of Saint-Exupery appended to the text, and a good list of discussion questions. It would appear that the main reason for the new edition is to align the book with Common Core curriculum goals. A set of essay questions is included at a RL 7.5 to RL 8.4 level, but the questions sound like "Blue Book" essays for a college freshman English class. Taken on its own, this book remains, as always, a lovely allegory for childhood innocence and maturation-caused changes in our perception of simple pleasures such as seeing the stars or nurturing a flower. The illustrations are reproductions of the original Saint-Exupery watercolors in all of their simplicity and innocence. This is a necessary purchase only for schools that need to meet Common Core standards, or those who somehow find themselves without another version. Reviewer: Lois Rubin Gross
School Library Journal
Gr 4 Up—Saint-Exupéry's little prince, interplanetary traveler and ingenuous seeker of that which is most important in life, returns in an elegant pop-up edition with unabridged text. The original artwork has been repositioned and redesigned to incorporate movable sculptures, turning wheels, and other visual effects. Almost every spread features an illustration, each carefully placed to add to the story's pacing and augment its impact. For example, readers' first glimpse of the little prince's tiny planet is dramatically presented via an illustration that spins upright as the page is turned. The boy's recounting of his relationship with his beloved yet vexing flower is made more immediate through a series of sequenced flaps, each harboring a tiny pop-up image. A towering 3-D depiction of the protagonist posed atop a mountain peak underscores his sense of loneliness. Delineated with a delicate touch, the paper engineering adds a new dimension to this wistful fairy tale without overpowering it, enhancing the story's subtleties and echoing its sense of wonder.—Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal
The Barnes & Noble Review

On my first trip to France, in my early twenties, I found myself overcome with nostalgia upon the discovery of a fountain pen embossed with a golden-haired, moon-eyed child in slouchy bell- bottom trousers and a dashing aviator ascot. My companion at the time, a native Manhattanite who'd had Tin Tin in the nursery and trips to Paris since elementary school, found my discovery about as riveting as an Eiffel Tower keychain. To me, as well as many other suburban-born American would-be Francophiles, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's Le Petit Prince was my first French chapter book, encountered as a teenager around the same time as cigarettes, crêpe pans, Camus's The Stranger (alas, in English), and Killing an Arab, the Cure's unfortunately named yet mostly accurate existentialist homage. To him, and any actual French person, the lovestruck space child is embroidered into the fabric of French childhood kitsch every bit as firmly as Mickey Mouse is to American children: as thoroughly Gallic in its philosophical posturing as the Disney empire is indebted to American capitalism, Le Petit Prince (or The Little Prince, as it's known to Anglophone readers) is an international blockbuster, each of its watercolor illustrations — the prince, his home on Asteroid B-612, his friend the fox, his troublesome love, the rose — replicated on generations of coffee mugs, sheet sets, plush toys, wristwatches, music boxes, and bath towels with matching robe.

The seventieth anniversary of the American publication has brought that kitsch Stateside. One can buy a Limited Edition gift set, with a hardcover copy of the book and a CD of the audiobook read by the actor Viggo Mortensen. Moleskine, in keeping with their well-known fetish for all things that might possibly invoke midcentury writers in Parisian cafés, offers a Le Petit Prince Limited Edition Day Planner, available in two sizes and two colors, dark gold and Prussian blue, and a gift box with notebooks, postcards, and stickers suitable for decoration (for nostalgia- comparison purposes, other pop cultural artifacts deemed worthy for embossing on Limited Edition Moleskine sets include Pac Man, Star Wars, Peanuts, and audiocassette tapes). There is an iPhone app and a something called the Little Prince 4D ride, the details of which I can't quite parse from the publicity video, but apparently it may be enjoyed at a French theme park (not necessarily so) near you.

All of which seems much merchandising about nothing when one considers that, while the exact boundaries that defines those singled out for the prince's disdain can be murky, the vulgar villains of the novella — those who seek to own the stars, or judge the beauty of a house not by the doves on its roof or the geraniums in its windows but by its price tag — may all be fairly accurately described as capitalists, or, in Exupéry's terms, "grown- ups."

Those looking to explain the enduring appeal of a story about a pilot transformed by a wise child he encounters while marooned for eight days in the desert might hazard a few guesses: There is the midcentury romantic appeal of air travel (Beryl Markham's midcentury aviation memoir West of the Night was also reissued this year). Exupéry himself was a globe-trotting aviator who was once stranded for four days in the Sahara Desert, and mysteriously disappeared and was presumed dead at age forty- four after flying a mission south of Marseille in 1944. The prince's story borrows well-worn tropes from Christian parables: Besides the desert-exile motif, there is a garden filled with good seeds and bad seeds, which must be sorted and separated from one another; a flower of a female persuasion, which may or may not cause the prince to fall from innocence; and a snake. At the end of his time in the desert, the prince volunteers for his own death then, Christ- like, is risen. Gregory Maguire, the author of Wicked, explains in his introduction to the seventieth anniversary edition, that once, after first knocking back a few glasses of rosé he asked a native Frenchman to explain the novel's "starry magic." The Frenchman reacted with a Gallic shrug and the non-explanation," 'It is full of truth.' He would not elaborate," writes Maguire. "He is French."

Fables, allegories, fairy tales, and world religions all take their beauty from the promise that universal truths lie in simply told stories. But the most plainly spoken belief to come from Exupéry's novel is also its most dismal: he glorifies childhood innocence and pays the cost with a radical distrust of adulthood. Human maturity, if Exupéry is to be believed, is the process by which an entire race of creatures is transformed from golden-haired children tilling their soil, guarding their flowers, and waiting for sunsets (the latter a sure sign of beautiful dreamers when used by S. E. Hinton in to describe greasers in Oklahoma in The Outsiders two decades later) into a race comprising solely accountants who would turn the very stars into notes on a ledger.

The dividing line between these two separate species is illustrated in a drawing that opens the novel: Children, he says, will know that it is a drawing of a boa constrictor who has swallowed an elephant. Grown-ups, he says, will see only a hat. Grown-ups are people who understand only "serious," subjects such as "geography, history, grammar and arithmetic," and to whom one may only speak of "reasonable things" such as "bridge and golf and politics and neckties" (as possible evidence that the grown-ups have since won, one may purchase a Le Petit Prince necktie in red, navy, or forest green silk from the official online boutique).

This elephant in the, ah, hat is the theme of the novel: the stark line that divides literature and math, art and science, body and soul, things that can be measured and things that must be imagined. The elephant is metaphor, the building block of art, and to speak of it to the grown-ups is, to invoke Mayakovsky (reprised by Billy Bragg), like "talking to the taxman about poetry." (The exact opposite of Exupéry's pastoral innocence may well be another midcentury children's book for grown-ups, or "precocious adults," written by an American woman. In Kay Thompson's arch, hilarious Eloise, the joy and humor come directly out of seeing a six-year-old girl engage with all the worldly pleasures of urban adulthood — charge cards, room service, boxing matches, mother's feathered mules — at her disposal).

This horror of the adult world seems cruel when inflicted upon children and teens just at the verge of crossing its threshold (not to mention generations of practicing artists, who, in Exupéry's terms, encounter the dubious choice between remaining a lifelong child or switching to the MBA track). Like many others who romanticize the purity of childhood, the boundary for Exupéry seems to be adolescence.

His "grown-ups," especially in midcentury terms, seem to be of a single gender as well: The grown-up is the person who pays the bills, the put-upon patriarch who labors without any particular love to support a family to whom he feels little more than obligated. One wonders if it is unkind to point out that this preoccupation with materialism was required more of the French petite bourgeoisie, whereas those of Exupéry 's aristocratic class tended to be encouraged to pursue more enlightened pursuits. Those inclined towards psychoanalysis — another popular midcentury pastime — might also point out that while Exupéry, the child, was raised to believe in his enlightened future, Exupéry, the young adult, discovered that his family's status was more material in name than in fortune, and thus was strongly encouraged to rustle up a few beans of his own to count.

There is no doubt whatsoever that love for a young lady is the thorn in our little prince's side. He is driven off his home planet when made half mad over the love of a flower, a rose described as vain, weak, emotionally manipulative, "contradictory," and given to "silly pretensions," and who often coughs to hide her lies. "You must never listen to flowers," confides the prince. "You must look at them and smell them."

This unflattering portrayal of romantic love seems even less appealing when one considers that the prince's rose is widely considered to be a stand-in for Exupéry 's wife, Consuelo Sunsin, a tempestuous beauty from El Salvador (like the prince's planet, home to three volcanoes), whom he often left alone during his travels, while he engaged in frequent adultery — the sin so singular to adulthood it shares its name. Consuelo was no shy flower herself, but the portrait she created of their marriage in her posthumous memoir The Tale of the Rose: The Love Story Behind the Little Prince, published days before the centennial celebration of Exupéry 's birth in 2000, was damning enough to put quite a damper on the festivities.

Despite the devout love it has inspired in generations of impressionable teenagers about to cross over into courtships of their own, Le Petit Prince is not a particularly convincing love story. It is better at describing the platonic friendship between equals that sustain men wandering away from their women: the prince and the fox; the pilot and the prince. The prince protects his rose, shields her behind glass, but never understands her. When he returns to his planet, the totem he brings back to commemorate his travels — the sheep in the box — may or may not kill her. Even the book itself was never dedicated to the rose. Instead, it was dedicated to Exupéry 's friend, the art critic and anarchist Leon Werth. Even that veered too close to the grown-ups for the prince of boyhood, so it was revised: "To Leon Werth, when he was a little boy." But those of us who are not — or have never been — little boys can still buy our place at the table. The Little Prince T-shirt for Grown-ups, in black and Prussian blue, is available now at the online boutique for men up to XL. Women, too.

Amy Benfer has worked as an editor and staff writer at Salon, Legal Affairs, and Paper magazine. Her reviews and features on books have appeared in Salon, The San Francisco Chronicle Book Review, The Believer, Kirkus Reviews, and The New York Times Book Review.

Reviewer: Amy Benfer

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783931372897
  • Publisher: Tivola Electronic Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/1/2000
  • Edition description: CD-ROM
  • Age range: 12 - 16 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.27 (w) x 9.19 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPÉRY, the "Winged Poet," was born in Lyon, France, in 1900. A pilot at twenty-six, he was a pioneer of commercial aviation and flew in the Spanish Civil War and World War II. His writings include The Little Prince , Wind, Sand and Stars , Night Flight , Southern Mail , and Airman's Odyssey . In 1944, while flying a reconnaissance mission for his French air squadron, he disappeared over the Mediterranean.

Richard Howard is the author of eleven books of poetry, including Untitled Subjects , which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1970, and Trappings . He is the translator of more than 150 works from the French and lives in New York City.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 241 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(176)

4 Star

(30)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(13)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 241 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 11, 2009

    I Adore the Book, Don't Like This Translation

    The Little Prince is a wonderful classic about life, love, making friends, falling in love, finding what is important in life, and saying goodbye. Saint-Exupery's tale is absolutely charming and full of wisdom.

    I bought this as a gift for a friend who was losing a dear pet. I still gave it to her, but I was disappointed by this translation.

    Unfortunately, the translation by Richard Howard lacks some of the heart of the tale, especially in many key places. For example, the phrase "L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux." is translated "Anything essential is invisible to the eyes." instead of "What is essential is invisible to the eyes." or "The essential part is invisible to the eyes."

    I much prefer the translation by Katherine Woods.

    20 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 18, 2009

    For Children of all ages

    I read this book once a year and give it as a gift even more often. It remindes me of what is really important in life. Life's lessons are there to take when you are ready. You must look for boa constrictors!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    In case you have forgotten what is really important.

    My first encounter with "The Little Prince" was having it read to me in kindergarten, over half a century ago. I received my first copy over twenty years later, from "the second great love of my life", to thank me for opening her heart.

    The tenets set forward by Antoine de Saint-Exupery stayed with me and helped strengthen and nurture relationships over the decades. I reminded my friend of her gift and its lessons several years ago as she was dying of cancer.

    Then, just a few weeks ago, a new friend found herself in the same position: A former lover, who remained a close friend for decades, was dying of cancer. So I sent her a copy of this book to help bring her some clarity.

    Perhaps it is true that everything you ever really needed to know you learned in kindergarten, which is why this so-called "children's book" is worth revisiting at any point in your life.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Hurray to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry!

    Another French classic I like along with the Count of Monte Cristo. The Little Prince is for all ages and a great book to read for children. It shows a lot of lesson and that is why I recommend this to all people who is fond of reading French Literature.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2013

    The Little Prince should be on every library shelf in the world!

    The Little Prince should be on every library shelf in the world! The ideas presented are guidelines to how to live a beautiful life! The lessons and story are for children and adults of all ages.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Cant get the book!!

    I got the sample but it was only the first picture and quote, so I went back and bought the book. However when I open the book it is still just the sample! I bought it and can't even read it :(

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2013

    I'm unhappy with the limited compatibility. I would've preferred

    I'm unhappy with the limited compatibility. I would've preferred a well formated epub like the way it is in the retail versions in Italian, French & German.
    Admittedly, I am not completely opposed the a PDF version all together, but the lack of an epub version is rather disappointing. If you're looking for a good ebook do not buy this. Anyone considering buying this version shouldn't and should buy a softcover version instead, as there is no real difference.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 17, 2012

    NOT FOR NOOK HD (no PagePerfect, i.e. graphically enhanced, book

    NOT FOR NOOK HD (no PagePerfect, i.e. graphically enhanced, books are).  
    They don't tell you this when you purchase a NOOK HD - which is the updated version of the Nook Color.

    The newest reader gets fewer compatible books, and none with enhanced graphics!  Nice.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    The best Book ever!

    This book gives you a reason to smile!!!!!!!!!!!! I love this book, some children may not understand it, but the illustrations will delight all!!!!!!!!! I recomend!!!!!! By it NOW!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2009

    THTE LITTLE PRINCE

    My 11year old and I read this book and we found very interesting and adventures. He even wrote a project on this book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Book That's Refreshing to Read

    This book is great for young people and adults in a fantasy story of a young boy on an incredible journey. But along the way it is constantly looking at beliefs and lessons. It is written in a very entertaining way and puts different things to think about right in front of the reader. Just a terrific way to spend and afternoon.

    Liz Cosline - Author/Life Ownership Coach
    SongofOneUnexpectedLife-S.O.U.L.
    http://songofoneunexpectedlife.info

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    My Favourite Book Forever and Ever...

    I really really really love this book. I would recommend it to anyone, of any age, from any background. I make a point of reading it at least once a year, plus again any time I have a major life event. This is written for the child in all of us, but adults--although not grown-ups (you'll know the difference after reading the book)--will appreciate it more and more through life. It is a gentle reminder of proper priorities--what's really important in life. It is so simple and lovely but also deeply philosophical. I prefer the translation by Kathrine Wood, but it's out of print. This newer translation is pretty good though. Read it. I know you'll love it. Oh, and point of interest: the author was a pilot. I like thinking he's the pilot in the story and the little prince is real.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2012

    Awesome!

    I read this in my French 3 class in school (in the french version) and I LOVED it! You can read it over and over again and never get bored of it. I love this book soooo much! Merci, mlle. Lanphere! :D

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    My Favourite Book Forever and Ever...

    I really really really love this book. I would recommend it to anyone, of any age, from any background. I make a point of reading it at least once a year, plus again any time I have a major life event. This is written for the child in all of us, but adults--although not grown-ups (you'll know the difference after reading the book)--will appreciate it more and more through life. It is a gentle reminder of proper priorities--what's really important in life. It is so simple and lovely but also deeply philosophical. I prefer the translation by Kathrine Wood, but it's out of print. This newer translation is pretty good though. Read it. I know you'll love it. Oh, and point of interest: the author was a pilot. I like thinking he's the pilot in the story and the little prince is real.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2008

    the 'little' prince

    As others must have said before me, this may be a little book, but the message is huge! I cannot believe that it took me this long to read this lovely tale. I was moved and read it twice in one night. Fantastic for all ages!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2007

    A Most Remembered Story

    A friend told me about this book over 25 years ago. She had a copy for me to read and she told me 'you must read this book - it tells about what is important in life.' I was sure she was mistaken - it looked just like any children's book. I read it and was taught so much about life that I have never forgotten. It is one of my most-remembered and most-cherished stories.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2000

    Purely Amazing

    I read this book first in its original French version and was lost in the beauty of it all. Then, reading the English translation, I was even more appreciative of the story. From every facet, the language, the illustration, the characters, I was amazed. This is a tremendous book to read because it subliminally enlightens the mind.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2000

    Is the best bokk i've ever read

    The little prince is the best book i've ever read. Is even better than other classics as 'El Quijote de la Manch', 'romeo & Juliet', etc. I consider it good because of its simplicity and message that it gives you. I recomend it to childs, teens and adults

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2000

    THIS IS THE BAD VERSION - DON'T BUY IT

    'The Little Prince' is the greatest piece of literature ever written, both in the original French version and the flawless English translation by Katherine Woods. This 'new' translation is just pitiful. It contorts some of the most touching moments in the novel and defiles Exupery's exquisite poignancy. I'm only giving it three stars because the subject material is basically intact. Anyway, don't buy this new version, buy the one by Katharine Woods! You'll love it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2000

    The Little Prince

    My all time favorite book. I absolutely LOVE it!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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