Little Red Riding Hood

( 2 )

Overview

In this inspired rendering of the classic Grimm Brothers folktale, five-time Caldecott Honor winning artist Jerry Pinkney introduced two favorite children's characters to a new generation: the sly, scary wolf and the sweet little girl in her famous red hood. Readers will squeal with delight all over again during that most memorable scene when Little Red Riding Hood declares, "Oh, Grandmamma, what great teeth you have!"

Pinkney's charming, masterfully-wrought illustrations—as ...

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Overview

In this inspired rendering of the classic Grimm Brothers folktale, five-time Caldecott Honor winning artist Jerry Pinkney introduced two favorite children's characters to a new generation: the sly, scary wolf and the sweet little girl in her famous red hood. Readers will squeal with delight all over again during that most memorable scene when Little Red Riding Hood declares, "Oh, Grandmamma, what great teeth you have!"

Pinkney's charming, masterfully-wrought illustrations—as warm and cozy as LIttle Red's cloak and as captivating ast he clever wold himself—are sure to lure you into the heart of this treasured tale.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Produced in the same generous format as Pinkney's (The Ugly Duckling) previous retellings of classic tales, this inviting work opens with a view of the heroine's mother posed very much like Whistler's mother, stitching a certain red cloak as a small window shows snow falling. Next she fills a basket with chicken soup and raisin muffins for ailing Grandmother and instructs her daughter, "Mind you, little miss . . . . Be certain to go straight there." As the girl sets out, the full-bleed art, rendered in Pinkney's characteristic style, reveals snowy woodlands in which animals and birds are cleverly camouflaged. The wolf, however, appears front and center. He "had a mind to eat her up at once," but the presence of woodcutters nearby deters him, and so he addresses her "in his most pleasant voice." The inclusion of various sounds-the "crunch, crunch" of the child's footsteps in the new snow, the "chop, chop" of the woodcutters' tools, and so on-augments the book's appeal as a read-aloud. The wolf, although seen repeatedly with its jaws open, sharp teeth bared, mostly cuts a comical figure, poorly disguised in Grandmother's nightgown and cap. The writing and the art are spry and satisfying, and with its blue-eyed African-American heroine, this book will be especially welcomed by families looking for traditional tales that feature a multiracial cast. Ages 3-6. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
The text of Pinkney's Little Red Riding Hood closely follows Grimm's cautionary tale; however, adults may find that Pinkney's illustrations and phrasing add an entertaining edge of sophisticated play with the conventions. The story unfolds in a winter setting, perfectly appropriate for its Northern European origin. However, the human characters are shown as racially mixed rather than blond and blue-eyed. The wolf is drawn in a way that is reminiscent of a fox, but young children often confuse these two sly villains anyway. Both illustrations and language do a curious mix of adding explanatory detail and milking the violence: kindly old grandma and sweet child are grabbed and gobbled down whole. Attracted by loud snores and dubious tracks into the house, the woodcutter is surprised by a stirring of the wolf's belly, which leads to a blow of the ax that kills the evil creature. The woodcutter then applies grandma's shears to the villain's belly, allowing Little Red Riding Hood to jump out, "bright as fresh snow." and Granny to follow, never having felt better. This version is a wonderful example of how illustrations can provide a "reading" that goes well beyond the text alone. It is likely to become a favorite for Pinkney fans.
Kirkus Reviews
A gorgeously illustrated version of the classic tale, this time with a brown-skinned protagonist. The plot's traditional, though Red takes "chicken soup and raisin muffins" to Grandmama, and the wolf tempts Red off the path not with standard wildflowers but by suggesting she "collect kindling for a fire." The setting is winter: Snow covers the ground and trees, while tiny red berries highlight evergreens. Pinkney's backgrounds (forests, snow drifts, stone walls) are dappled with light; pencil and ink lines, and watercolor and gouache paint, subtly imply the presence of elusive faces or shapes. They merit extra time for perusal but never distract from the stunning crimson of Red's cloak or the wolf's fascinatingly devious and deviant postures. When the woodcutter chops open the wolf, the viewpoint is from outside the cottage, revealing only a small shadow through the doorway. Meanwhile, a bright red bird stands in a snowy bush as a sign that Red will be fine. A beautiful new rendering. (Picture book/fairy tale. 3-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316013550
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 186,515
  • Age range: 1 - 6 Years
  • Lexile: AD840L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.87 (w) x 11.25 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

Jerry Pinkney is one of the most heralded children's book illustrators of all time. He has the rare distinction of being the recipient of five Caldecott Honors and the winner of the 2010 Caldecott medal for The Lion and the Mouse, and has since created two companion picture books: The Tortoise & the Hare and The Grasshopper & the Ants. He has won the Coretta Scott King Award five times, the Coretta Scott King Honor four times, and has been nominated for the prestigious Hans Christian Anderson Award. He was also the first children's book illustrator elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives with his wife, author Gloria Jean Pinkney, in Croton-on-Hudson, New York. The artist invites you to visit his website at jerrypinkneystudio.com.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 9, 2009

    Little Red Riding Hood

    A beautifully illustrated rendition of an old favorite. Children will continue to love the travels of Little Red Riding Hood.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    A beautifully illustrated book for a classic children's fairy tale.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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